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Practical Sportsbikes

Practical Sportsbikes

December 2020

Practical Sportsbikes magazine is about buying, fixing, restoring and riding sportsbikes from the 1970s, ’80s and ’90s. Every issue of PS – the magazine home of new-wave Japanese and Italian classics – is packed with: - The most inspiring and ingenious reader restorations - The most in-depth road tests and buyers’ guides - Unmissable workshop tips and how-to features Practical Sportsbikes gets under the skin of the bikes that really matter to our readers and explains how best to maintain, rebuild and enjoy them. So if you’re in to sportsbikes from the 1970-1990s, PS is essential reading.

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Pays:
United Kingdom
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
H BAUER PUBLISHING LIMITED
Fréquence:
Monthly
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12 Numéros

dans ce numéro

1 min.
welcome

ISSUE 122 DECEMBER 2020 Technical innovation has given us some of the finest bikes ever made. From Vincent twins, through Yamaha 350LCs, to the BMW S1000RR, some manufacturers always strive to bring something new to the table, even in the face of sceptical luddites. And we would make the argument that no single manufactuter has pursued more innovation than Bimota, even if they’ve not always had the resources to really make a go of it. And nothing screams ‘Bimota!’ more than a hub-steered bike. Others came before, but Bimota persevered and put it on the road first. And they’ve stuck by the Tesi’s DCS concept since, while Yamaha dabbled, then decided to back off. Few know them better than PSPB contributor Alan Cathcart, who shares his intimate experiences of the funny frontend…

1 min.
the team

Damian Smith Art Editor Wor Damo spends much of his free time doing VERY funny things with his front-end, the dirty old twerp. damian.smith@pspb.co.uk Mark Graham Production Editor There’s nothing funny about MG. Unless you count the comedic spectacle of him grappling with any kind of electronic item, no matter how primitive or basic. mark.graham@pspb.co.uk Alan Seeley Technical Editor Just the sort of person who would buy a Bimota, but like the company itself, he’s in a constant state of disarray and still hasn’t got it sorted. alan.seeley@pspb.co.uk Gary Hurd Workshop Consultant An admirer of the SB series, but painfully aware he’d never fit one. Has yet to convince spouse Jacki to replace their Toby Jug collection with an SB2 in the front room. editorial@pspb.co.uk John McAvoy Road Tester JMac still rates the electronics-free DB8 as one of the finest-handling bikes built. Patiently…

3 min.
new fz750 book

PS reader Michael Boyle has written and released a comprehensive book on the subject of the FZ750. Our copy of Yamaha FZ750 hadn’t arrived yet so we’ll let Michael explain more: “My reason for writing the book was fairly simple. Having consumed Rupert Paul’s article in the Sept 2015 issue of PB while at the MGP, I was surprised there wasn’t a decent book about the FZ750. I mean Suzuki celebrated the GSX-R with a book by Marc Cook, so that was the task I set myself. “I would describe it as an enthusiast’s book, whereas the GSX-R book is quite corporate (it even has a Suzuki part number), Yamaha have had no input into the book. I do have to single out Ferry Brouwer who could not have been more…

3 min.
bikes reunited

Our quest to reunite (or at least reconnect via digital communication) owners and long-lost machines continues. This month chiefly features Andrew Cole, who recently matched his Z1100R with its previous owner, and he’d now like to find out the whereabouts of some of his own exes. If you’d like to try and trace one of your old bikes, we’ll need the reg number, list of any distinguishing features, and a picture: we do require the latter as proof you’ve actually owned it. We appreciate not everyone has old pics, but them’s the rules… email: editorial@pspb.co.uk 1 Andrew Cole (x3) Kawasaki Z1000A2: SRG 67S I loved this bike and bought it directly after I sold the Honda. It was fitted with cowhorn handlebars when I first got it and I swapped them for ace…

2 min.
specials we like

HONDA HAWK 700 At first glance this V-twin Honda looks much like a track-ready VTR1000 SP-1. Gawp closer, however, and you’ll see it’s actually a genius update of Honda’s late ’80s middleweight masterpiece the Hawk GT (or BROS, as it was known in Japanese grey import circles). It’s taken its builder, Matt Blashfield, to eight State Championships and one National title in the US. And as you might expect, the spec is impressive: 90bhp and 53lb.ft from 700cc with JE pistons, billet crank, titanium rods, Jeff Reel heads, valves and cams, 39mm flatslides, a machined-from- solid clutch, Technomagnesio wheels, CBR600RR front-end, MB pipes, and a custom carbon fibre tank. MARLBORO YAMAHA YZR500 REP This Italian-built RD500LC special does a great job of aping Yamaha’s 1982 Marlboro 0W54 YZR500, as raced by Graeme Crosby…

6 min.
in your shed

To: editorial@pspb.co.uk only for the time being - postal submissions won’t reach us until we’re able to return to office-based working. Sorry! Suzuki RGV250 and RGV500 Builder: Billy Schultz Owned for: VJ23 since new, 500 since 2000 So far: tweaked 250, full 500 conversion What’s next: keep them running crisply My 1997 Suzuki RGV 250 VJ23 is a factory full-power Lucky Strike, not a restricted repaint. I’ve had it since new, and all it’s needed is a set of Brian Turfrey expansion chambers, upgraded reeds, cylinder work and rejetting. I’ve had the ’91 250SP since 2000, when I started the conversion with an RG500 Gamma motor. It’s fitted with Keihin PWK carbs for better throttle response. The bodywork is Sharkskins MV race fairings. This bike is just as beautiful under the ’skins and runs and handles beautifully on…