Publishers Weekly August 23, 2021

Publishers Weekly magazine is the definitive professional resource covering every aspect of book publishing and book selling. Over 20,000 book and media professionals turn to Publishers Weekly each week for news and information. Publishers Weekly covers the creation, production, marketing and sale of the written word in book, audio, video and electronic formats.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
PWxyz, LLC
Fréquence:
Weekly
6,92 €(TVA Incluse)
189,44 €(TVA Incluse)
51 Numéros

dans ce numéro

1 min
the week in publishing

Terumi Echols has been appointed to the newly created role of president and publisher at Christian publisher IVP. Echols, who had been director of finance and ful-fillment operations, succeeds Jeff Crosby, who is now president and CEO of the ECPA. Thirty-nine employees at two outlets of Brooklyn’s Greenlight Bookstore and one location of Yours Truly, Brooklyn, a stationery store, have voted to join the Retail, Wholesale, and Department Store Union. Bookstore sales soared 81.1% in June over last year, finishing the first half of 2021 with a 30% increase over the first six months of 2020. Sales at the end of June were $3.67 billion. Jack Covert, founder of the business book bookseller and distributor Porchlight Book Company (originally known as 800-CEO READ), died on August 13. He was 77. Online & On-Air The Week…

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3 min
hbg stays in the hunt

At the end of 2020, the Hachette Book Group was the fourth-largest trade publisher in the country, with estimated annual sales of roughly $700 million. When the acquisition of Simon & Schuster—the third-largest trade publisher—by #1 trade publisher Penguin Random House is finally completed, HBG will move into the third spot. Last week, HBG took a major step to ensure that it will assume S&S’s position as the largest trade publisher behind PRH and HarperCollins, with its agreement to acquire Workman Publishing for $240 million. One of few remaining independent publishers of its size, Workman had sales of $134 million last year, and its addition will get HBG revenue over the $800 million level. HBG CEO Michael Pietsch noted that the Workman deal was HBG’s sixth, and largest, acquisition in eight years.…

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1 min
print unit sales dip in mid-august

Unit sales of print books declined 1.3% in the week ended Aug. 14, 2021, from the comparable week in 2020, at outlets that report to NPD BookScan. Sales of adult nonfiction had another down week, with units off 8.5% from a year ago, despite a good showing among books written from conservative perspectives. Mark Levin’s American Marxism remained #1 in the category, selling more than 58,000 copies. A new title by Tuck er Carlson, The Long Slide, was in second place on the category list, selling nearly 30,000 copies. Last year at this time, conservative favorite Sean Hannity’s Live Free or Die was #1, selling just under 108,000 copies. YA fiction sales slipped 0.4% from the week ended Aug. 15, 2020, when Stephenie Meyer’s block buster Midnight Sun sold about…

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4 min
indie publishers embrace success

Like the big trade publishers, many independent publishers had surprisingly good years in 2020. Some benefited from the explosion of interest in children’s workbooks and other educational materials as parents looked to entertain and educate their kids at home, while others had backlist titles that met the increased demand for books on gardening, cooking, home improvement, and race and social justice. Boston’s Beacon Press had an unprecedented 2020, with a slate of bestselling titles on anti-racism, led by Robin DiAngelo’s White Fragility, which sold about 867,000 print copies at outlets that report to NPD BookScan. Director Helene Atwan said sales were so high last year that she is modeling revenue in 2021 against 2019. While it’s still relatively early in the year—and revenue often dips in summer because of the press’s…

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4 min
bookselling profile: the king’s english bookshop

Thomas Wolfe famously wrote, “You can’t go back home to your family, back home to your childhood.” Unless, that is, you’re Calvin Crosby and your home is The King’s English Bookshop. A quarter-century after Crosby, 55, left his native Utah for California, he quit his job as executive director of the California Independent Booksellers Alliance and returned to become co-owner, as of July 1, of the Salt Lake City literary icon. “There was so much that still had to be done with CALIBA, but this store is so special, so much a part of me,” Crosby explained. “The opportunity could not be passed up.” Crosby, who is of Cherokee descent, recalled his first visit to The King’s English when he was a teenager. “Everybody was so nice,” he said. “Growing up…

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3 min
deals

DEAL OF THE WEEK Morrow Bets Big on an Adult Debut After a 10-house auction, Lucia Macro at William Morrow won North American rights to Emiko Jean’s adult debut, Mika in Real Life, for seven figures. Jean is the author of the YA novel Tokyo Ever After, which was a Reese’s Book Club YA Pick. The deal was brokered by Erin Harris at Folio Literary Management and Joelle Hobeika at Alloy Entertainment. Mika in Real Life follows a Japanese American woman who, Harris said, “reconnects with the daughter she placed for adoption 17 years ago and suddenly gets a second chance at motherhood, love, and the career she always wanted.” The novel also explores “larger issues of overcoming personal trauma and the model minority myth.” A number of foreign rights deals…

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