Publishers Weekly November 24, 2021

Publishers Weekly magazine is the definitive professional resource covering every aspect of book publishing and book selling. Over 20,000 book and media professionals turn to Publishers Weekly each week for news and information. Publishers Weekly covers the creation, production, marketing and sale of the written word in book, audio, video and electronic formats.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
PWxyz, LLC
Fréquence:
Weekly
7,20 €(TVA Incluse)
197,11 €(TVA Incluse)
51 Numéros

dans ce numéro

3 min
all of our stars

Welcome to Publishers Weekly’s ninth Children’s Starred Reviews Annual! In these pages, you’ll find more than 350 reviews of books for children and teens published in 2021 that received a star from PW, indicating that they are titles of exceptional merit. We’ve arranged these reviews into five categories—Picture Books, Chapter Books, Middle Grade, Young Adult, and Comics—making it easy to find your new favorite read. Our issue also includes interviews with some of today’s top authors and illustrators, and a list of our 50 Best Books of 2021. Happy reading! ABOUT OUR COVER ARTIST RUTH CHAN Community is a recurring theme in author-illustrator Ruth Chan’s life and books, and it’s buoyed her throughout the pandemic, she says. “We all needed a bit of kindness and thoughtfulness and support.” Work is another constant.…

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2 min
pw’s best children’s books 2021

Picture Books The 1619 Project: Born on the Water. Nikole Hannah-Jones and Renée Watson, illus. by Nikkolas Smith...........................................................................................page 7 The Big Bath House. Kyo Maclear, illus. by Gracey Zhang.................................................. 9 Chez Bob. Bob Shea................................................................................................... 13 Circle Under Berry. Carter Higgins................................................................................. 14 Dad Bakes. Katie Yamasaki.......................................................................................... 14 Have You Seen Gordon? Adam Jay Epstein, illus. by Ruth Chan......................................... 21 Keeping the City Going. Brian Floca................................................................................ 27 Let Me Fix You a Plate. Elizabeth Lilly............................................................................. 28 The Longest Storm. Dan Yaccarino................................................................................. 30 Mel Fell. Corey R. Tabor................................................................................................ 32 Milo Imagines the World. Matt de la Peña, illus. by Christian Robinson............................... 33 The Night Walk. Marie Dorléans, trans. from the French by Polly Lawson............................. 36 Nina: A Story of Nina Simone. Traci N. Todd, illus. by Christian Robinson............................. 37 The People’s Painter: How Ben Shahn Fought for Justice with Art. Cynthia Levinson, illus. by Evan Turk........................................................................................................ 40 The…

157 min
picture books

BOARD BOOKS Big Bear, Little Bear Marine Schneider. Cameron Kids, $9.99 (22p) ISBN 978-1-951836-28-3 In this expertly crafted board book by Schneider, readers can compare the personal effects of brown, anthropomorphic Big Bear and child Little Bear. Set against swaths of paint, each spread features one of Big Bear’s belongings on the left, and Little Bear’s corresponding item on the right; corresponding labels run along the bottom of each page. A gentle humor pervades the text: one red left-hand page reads “Big Bear’s car,” showing a reverse silhouette in white of the figure in an automobile; the facing page, washed in muted storm blue, reads “Little Bear’s car,” showing Big Bear hauling Little Bear in a red-and-white-checked baby sling. The simple pages cycle through several everyday objects in this affirming, loosely chronological account,…

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1 min
the 1619 project: born on the water

When a Black child, this story’s narrator, feels shame surrounding a family tree assignment (“I can only count back three generations, here, in this country”), their parents and grandparents offer what an author’s note calls “a proud origin story.” In meticulous, forthright poems by Newbery Honoree Watson and 1619 Project founder Hannah-Jones, the family reaches back to the Kingdom of Ndongo, where their ancestors “had a home, a place, a land,/ a beginning.” Subsequent spreads describe the child’s West Central African forbears, who spoke Kimbundu (“had their own words/ for love/ for friend/ for family”), were good with their hands and minds, excelled at math and science, “and they danced.” When the lines recount how, in 1619, those ancestors were shackled and ferried across the Atlantic to Virginia on the…

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1 min
katie yamasaki on dad bakes

What do you hope readers will take away from this narrative? I’ve seen reviews wondering why I didn’t offer the dad’s history up front. The whole point is that you get to know this family as just a family—these quiet moments of joy—and then learn more about them afterward. It puts a bit of responsibility on the reader, to investigate their own assumptions. There’s this binary of good guys vs. bad guys—if you’re good, you stay, if you’re bad, you go away—but it’s actually so much more complicated than that. I did this one project with teenage boys who were incarcerated, and we were doing word bubbles with another teaching artist. We asked, “How do you see yourself?” and they put things like “smart,” “loving brother,” “good babysitter,” “good at math,” “great…

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1 min
have you seen gordon?

It opens like any seek-and-findbook: as elaborately detailed, laugh-out-loud spreads by Chan (The Alpactory) show anthropomorphized animals of a variety of species enjoying the beach, the city, and so on, Epstein’s (the Snared series) chirpy narrator insists that readers spot an eager-eyed purple tapir named Gordon. But Gordon quickly grows disenchanted with the Where’s Waldo–style premise—he foils the search by donning an easily spotted orange shirt and propeller hat, then announces from a parade float that he’s done altogether: “I’m proud of who I am. From now on, I want to stand out.” The narrator also rankles the next protagonist pick, a shy blue rhino called Jane who flees each spread. As the omniscient voice blows through personal boundaries, Gordon steps up and firmly speaks truth to narrator power: “Instead…

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