Publishers Weekly November 29, 2021

Publishers Weekly magazine is the definitive professional resource covering every aspect of book publishing and book selling. Over 20,000 book and media professionals turn to Publishers Weekly each week for news and information. Publishers Weekly covers the creation, production, marketing and sale of the written word in book, audio, video and electronic formats.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
PWxyz, LLC
Fréquence:
Weekly
7,20 €(TVA Incluse)
197,11 €(TVA Incluse)
51 Numéros

dans ce numéro

2 min
will publishing sales grow again?

When the Association of American Publishers released its final industrywide sales report for 2020 last month, it showed another basically flat year, with sales of $25.71 billion, down 0.2% compared to 2019. The small decline was in keeping with the overall pattern over the past five years. Between 2016 and 2020, overall publishing sales rose only in 2019, up 1.7% over 2018, and 2020 sales were down 3.9% compared to 2016. The trade segment, the industry’s largest, has been the steadiest performer over the past five years, with sales up 3.1% in 2020 compared to 2016. The adult category was the main driver, with sales rising 4.9%, while sales in the children’s/YA category fell 0.8%. The decline in children’s/YA is slightly deceiving, since 2016 was an exceptionally strong year for children’s/YA…

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3 min
lonely planet comes out of lockdown

A mid global travel restrictions and under a new parent company, Lonely Planet spent 2021 retooling. Digital media platform Red Ventures acquired Lonely Planet from NC2 Media in December 2020, leaving many in the industry wondering how Lonely Planet’s print program and other content offerings would fare. Known for its pocket-size destination guides and phrasebooks, Lonely Planet already had expanded its digital presence in the adult market while continuing to publish Lonely Planet Kids titles and coffee-table volumes. When the pandemic grounded national and international travel, “we had to make some tough decisions,” said publisher Piers Pickard, who has been with Lonely Planet since 2006. “We became a much smaller company.” Pickard acknowledged that the pandemic led to a difficult period and called the Red Ventures acquisition “lucky”: “I want to underline…

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3 min
anchor hardcovers ready to debut

Since announcing the launch of its inaugural hardcover list in January, Anchor has unveiled the four titles—three of which are debut novels—that make up that list. At a virtual event earlier in the fall, Suzanne Herz, publisher of Vintage and Anchor, said that the spring 2022 list largely comprises thrillers and mysteries—genres that have not traditionally been covered by Anchor, which is the oldest trade paperback publisher in the U.S. “Expanding our paperback publishing program with a carefully curated hardcover list is a very exciting opportunity,” Herz told PW. In addition to thrillers and mysteries, the list will also focus on psychological suspense, commercial fiction, and “popular and voicey nonfiction.” As was previously announced, Edward Kastenmeier will lead the new program as v-p and editorial director of Anchor Books hardcovers. A 30-year…

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5 min
deals

DEAL OF THE WEEK Little, Brown Plucks Harris’s ‘Rose’ Ben George at Little, Brown bought world rights to Nathan Harris’s sophomore novel, The Rose of Jericho. Harris published his debut, The Sweetness of Water, with LB in June, and it went on to become longlisted for the Booker Prize, an Oprah Book Club pick, and a New York Times bestseller. The publisher said the new novel is “a sweeping saga following siblings Coleman and June three years after they have been freed from slavery.” It opens in 1868, a few years after The Sweetness of Water concludes, as the siblings’ former owner has fled Louisiana for Mexico, with June in tow, “on a quixotic mission to form a colony with other Confederate rebels intent on re-creating the antebellum lifestyle to which…

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1 min
musso, fitzek, and rowling on top across europe

In France, The Unknown of the Seine by Guillaume Musso, about a woman who seemingly returns from the dead, was the #1 title in late October. Musso is France’s most popular author, with more than 28 million copies sold in more than 40 languages, according to research firm GFK. His books are published in English by Little, Brown. Agnes Ledig’s romance The Tiny Queen took the second slot. Prolific thriller writer Sebastian Fitzek regularly tops German fiction bestseller lists, and he’s done so again in late October with Playlist, about an investigation into the disappearance of a teenager that seeks clues in her music playlists. More and more of Fitzek’s titles have been appearing in English lately, published by Head of Zeus. Antje Rávik Strubel’s The Blue Woman, about a young…

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7 min
a provensen revival

Prolific illustrators Alice and Martin Provensen influenced generations of young readers and midcentury designers through their visual storytelling. Their handcrafted style ranges from cozy and familiar to surprising and contemporary in a present-day trio of new books: The Art of Alice and Martin Provensen (Chroma, Jan. 2022), a retro-spective filled with rarities; The Provensen Book of Fairy Tales (New York Review Books, out now), a reissued classic; and The Truth About Max (Enchanted Lion, fall 2022), a previously unpublished picture book. Each volume provides a distinct perspective on the creative duo. Coincidentally, both Martin (1916–1987) and Alice (1918–2018) grew up in Chicago and worked as animators in Los Angeles—Alice at Walter Lantz, Martin at Disney. As chronicled in The Art of Alice and Martin Provensen, they first met in 1943, married…

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