Voyages et Plein air
Sunset

Sunset May 2016

SUNSET celebrates your love of Western living. Discover new weekend and day trip destinations, inspiring homes and gardens, and fast and fresh recipes that highlight the West's great local ingredients. For annual or monthly subscriptions (on all platforms except iOS), your subscription will automatically renew and be charged to your provided payment method at the end of the term unless you choose to cancel. You may cancel at any time during your subscription in your account settings. If your provided payment method cannot be charged, we may terminate your subscription.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Sunset Publishing Corporation
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3 min.
summer camp

OUTDOOR JOYS With ideas for crafts, cooking, and more, Camp Sunset shows you how to elevate any campout into an unforgettable summer experience. I GREW UP in the wilds of New York City with nature as an abstract concept. Never once did I pitch a tent or pick up a paddle until my parents sent me, at age 15, to the Outward Bound wilderness program on Hurricane Island, Maine, where over the course of a month I rappelled down cliffs, kayaked across choppy coastal waters, and spent three days alone on the side of a mountain with only a tarp and a tub of trail mix for company. Needless to say, that experience changed my life. Despite the physical challenges (and the mosquitoes!), I returned to my urban existence with a…

5 min.
best of the west

FOUND ON CRAIGSLIST! HOT WHEELS BEST IN TOW It's a well-known fact that Washington Coast shores are frigid, even in summer. Need a rain jacket? Probably. A wetsuit? Definitely. A mobile steam room? Yes, please! "We wanted to build a sauna in our backyard but didn't want to make it a permanent feature," says Sara Gainey of Seattle's Form Shop Fabrication, which she co-owns with her fiancé, Carl Ostergaard, and their friend John Dietrich. Starting with a retired horse trailer, the three gutted, insulated, sealed, and rebuilt the interior with cedar paneling, benches, and a Finnish stove. The saunas are made to order; this one also converts into a bed, so Gainey and Ostergaard can camp in it—or turn it into backyard guest quarters. Prices vary; formshopfabrication.com. A SUCCULENT COLORING BOOK! BEST TIME SUCK Comfortably ensconced…

1 min.
dive into bliss

QUIET THE AWE OF A UTAH POOL AMANGIRI HOTEL A trippy desert oasis, Amangiri is gracefully plunked in Navajo country, hidden among giant sandstone rocks. Although the resort is technically in the middle of nowhere, it is within striking distance of America's greatest outbacks, including Zion. But the real national treasure might very well be the resort's pool. It resembles a serene lake and is literally carved into the landscape, flowing around millions-year-old rock. There are chaises from which to stare at all the Earth's layers. Meanwhile, two barefoot steps away are watsu and massage and, as is the Aman way, more servers than guests at your beck and call. From $1,900; aman.com. RIOT NEW TO THE PARTY ARRIVE HOTEL In a land where pool parties reign, the latest has arrived in Palm Springs' Uptown Design District…

7 min.
festival fever

YOU CAN'T FULLY understand the Manifest Destiny–size of something like Stagecoach—the fastest-growing country music festival in the United States, drawing some 225,000 people to California's Coachella Valley every spring—until you are staring out at a sea of cowboys pumping their fists in the air. People magazine reported that Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis were somewhere in the crowd that night, although who could tell? We'd arrived absurdly late and had to park so far away we could have been in Nashville. I was off schedule and a little off the rails. I don't mean to sound insensitive. It's just that I'd been dreaming about this weekend for so long that I didn't want to miss a beat. I wasn't alone. We're living in the Golden Age of Music Festivals. And by…

3 min.
backstage pass

[The following content appeared in the Northern California and Southern California edition.] First music festival? Coachella, 2010. I was in college and a girl I had a crush on was going. I didn't have enough money for a ticket, so I waited until 4 a.m. and snuck over the back fence. I fell asleep under a trailer until the sun came up, and when I walked out I saw that I was backstage. I spent the next three days photographing my favorite musicians up close. It was amazing. I knew then that this was what I wanted to do with the rest of my life. Why are summer festivals so huge? I think we've forgotten how to lose ourselves. That sense of freedom you feel when you're standing with thousands of strangers,…

2 min.
spring flings

Lanai Alan Phinney, managing editor: Known more for hikes and horseback riding than surfing, Lanai is a Hawaiian island that takes you by surprise. Its lowlands are all red cliffs, ocher hills, and green coves; upcountry is cool and pine shaded. Tech mogul Larry Ellison, who bought 98 percent of the island in 2012, must have fallen for Lanai's assets: warm water, sugary beaches, and starry night skies (there's no light pollution). STAY: Ellison also owns the gracious Four Seasons Resort Lanai, reopened this winter beachside. The 217-room resort, with four restaurants, including Nobu, takes its design cues from the landscape of lava rocks and sparkling waters. From $1,075; four seasons.com/lanai. PHOTO OP: Hike to Pu'upehe Rock for flaming sunrises and views of iridescent Shark Cove. SNORKEL: Hulopo'e Bay, a state marine preserve, teems…