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Guitar MagazineGuitar Magazine

Guitar Magazine February 2019

The Guitar Magazine provides in-depth and essential reading for the serious guitarist, with dozens of guitar tests, playing techniques, an exclusive bass section and in-depth features on guitar heroes past, present and future. Each issue is packed full of reviews of the latest guitars, amps, effects and basses. The Guitar Magazine also delivers the informed verdict on home recording equipment and regularly offers tips on buying second hand and vintage gear. When you occasionally put down that guitar, it is also packed full of interviews with the great and good of guitardom!

Pays:
United Kingdom
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Bandlab UK Limited
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12 Numéros

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access_time2 min.
the new style

Welcome to a new era at Guitar Magazine. Regular readers will already know about – and hopefully have visited – our new website at Guitar.com, where you’ll find thousands of articles including expert reviews, insightful features, video demos, pro tips and lessons that will help make you a better, and more informed, guitar player. Here, throughout all 148 pages of the new and improved print magazine, you’ll experience a beautiful new design, along with world-class photography of vintage and modern instruments presented in breathtaking close-up detail. Among our contributors you’ll hear from familiar voices and one or two new additions, too. I would boast that we’d assembled a premier-league squad that comprises some of the most knowledgeable and entertaining guitar writers on the planet, but I wouldn’t want to let that kind…

access_time3 min.
fretbuzz

DOWN THE TUBES Dear Guitar Magazine, considering how good transistor amps are now, I do wonder why anyone, pro or amateur, would bother with valve technology at all? I’ve never had one. You’ve got processors that emulate up any amp sound you want, then there are the Roland/Boss amps, some with a plug-in capsule that looks like a valve… but isn’t! Is this the end of valves? Far from it. It seems, looking in the magazine, there are still many people out there making true valve amps. Aside from the three kings – Fender, Marshall and Vox – there are numerous makers from both England and the US hand-building top-quality products selling for top-dollar prices. There must be something in the way a vacuum tube interacts that moves people enough to spend, in…

access_time3 min.
lindsay ell @lindsayell

“WHEN I WAS EIGHT, DAD TAUGHT ME STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN. I KNEW IMMEDIATELY THAT ME AND THE GUITAR WAS GOING TO BE SOMETHING SPECIAL” What was the catalyst for your relationship with the guitar? “I started playing piano when I was six, and my dad put my first guitar – a little cheap black Ibanez – in my hands when I was eight. He taught me Stairway To Heaven. Really! I knew immediately that me and the guitar was going to be something special. I wasn’t just the only girl playing guitar at school, I was the only person. I was really uncool. But with every bone in my body, this is what I have wanted to do since I was 10 years old.” When did you first start performing in public? “I learned…

access_time4 min.
steve hackett at the edge of light

Steve Hackett’s place in the pantheon of guitar legends was assured thanks to his hugely influential work with prog pioneers Genesis, contributing his skills to such iconic albums as Selling England By The Pound and The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway. Since he left the band in 1977, Hackett has been remarkably prolific, with a varied discography that includes 25 solo studio albums. His latest, At The Edge Of Light, is released on 25 January 2019. Ahead of the record’s release, we asked the 68-year-old Londoner to pick out his five highlights from the new album: BEASTS IN OUR TIME “The second half is full of guitar salvos. It has that element of film noir meets spook, and a driving bassline, which I doubled with guitar. I used a goldtop Fernandes Sustainer Guitar, which…

access_time2 min.
win a heritage h-150

Starting in 1917, some of the greatest electric guitars of all time were built at 225 Parsons Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan – the former home of the Gibson guitar company. From Bursts and ES-335s to Firebirds and Explorers, 225 Parsons Street was the address at which they all were born, until Gibson finally shifted production to Nashville in 1984. But that wasn’t the end of 225 Parsons Street’s guitar-building story. In 1985, former Gibson employees Jim Deurloo, Marv Lamb and JP Moats were among those who set up Heritage Guitars, and the company has been making instruments inspired by the building’s rich history ever since. Here in 2019, to celebrate the arrival of the all-new and improved Guitar Magazine, we’ve partnered with Heritage Guitars so that one lucky reader will win a H-150…

access_time17 min.
holy grails

It begins in late November on a rainy morning in Paris. The previous day had almost been a write-off – fog-induced flight cancellations in London and then an extended spell in rush-hour traffic on the southbound autoroute from Charles de Gaulle didn’t exactly provide a picture-postcard welcome to one of Europe’s most alluring cities. The UK and France may only be separated by a single one-hour timezone, but spending the best part of a day in an airport causes a palpable sense of disorientation, as does waking up before dawn to find the city lights still flickering through the drizzle running down our hotel window. After falling victim to the Parisian traffic again and arriving late back from breakfast, we make our apologies to our driver and head south-west to the…

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