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Allure

Allure November 2017

Allure, the first and only magazine devoted to beauty, is an insider's guide to a woman's total image. Allure investigates and celebrates beauty and fashion with objectivity and candor, and places appearance in a larger cultural context.

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Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast US
Frequency:
Monthly
£4.34
£14.47
11 Issues

in this issue

1 min
outer space

24 Number of products beauty vlogger and CoverGirl spokesperson James Charles used to re-create Snapchat’s galaxy filter with makeup. 1962 Year the Lovelace Woman in Space Program was terminated because of a lack of funding—and concerns over how women’s menstrual cycles would affect their ability to work in space. 0.007 Seconds slower humans age in space than on Earth, due to relative velocity time dilation—the phenomenon in which time slows as speed increases. 100 Number of tampons NASA engineers planned to pack for Sally Ride’s one-week mission when she became the first American female astronaut to enter orbit in 1983. (She let them know that half that amount would be more than enough.) 50 Percentage of the 2016 class of astronauts at NASA that was female. 33 Feet in the air that a Chanel-branded rocket…

2 min
making scents

Just before he got married in the fall of 1792, German merchant Wilhelm Muelhens received a bottle of aqua mirabilis from a Carthusian monk as a wedding gift. Back then, aqua mirabilis was a tonic, made with extracts of bergamot, lemon, and orange, that was believed to have healing powers—but above all, it smelled amazing. Muelhens decided to make his own aqua mirabilis in his home on the Glockengasse in Cologne. In 1794 Napoleon’s forces swept through. One of the lesser-known side effects of an invasion by a notorious French general soon to be emperor: His forces numbered all the buildings in the city, effectively giving them addresses. Muelhens lived at what was marked 4711, which later inspired the name of the scent. As ruler, Napoleon demanded that all internal…

2 min
going to e x tre mes

8 min
life ever after

the reorganizer Laura Carstensen is the director of the Center of Longevity at Stanford University and the author of A Long Bright Future: Happiness, Health, and Financial Security in an Age of Increased Longevity (PublicAffairs). The average life span has already increased dramatically. What are some of the realities of living longer that we need to address right now? “Life expectancy nearly doubled in the 20th century. And that happened so fast that the culture that guides us through life hasn’t had time to catch up. It does a pretty good job until we reach about 50, which is what life expectancy was 100 years ago. Now, we suddenly have 30 extra years, and we’ve been as unimaginative as we possibly could be in using them. We tacked them all on at…

1 min
look we love perfect foil

MacGyver never set out to obliterate lipstick clichés with a repurposed tool (he was always tied up with more trivial things, like rescuing civilians). Which is why we’re lucky to have Pat McGrath. The makeup artist has spent her career MacGyvering—nay, McGrathing!—aspirational makeup looks from raw materials on hand. And Maison Margiela, a brand that continuously draws inspiration from crazytown, is in many ways her fashion analogue. For its couture show, McGrath layered her (very new, very good) Lust MatteTrance lipsticks in Elson and Obsessed underneath crimson foil to create truly dimensional shine. It was a feat of ingenuity, daring, and, yes, bravery. Plus, it just looks insanely cool. FROM LEFT: JOSEPHINE SCHIELE; COURTESY OF MAISON MARGIELA…

3 min
a world without animal testing?

Google “cosmetics tested on animals in 2017,” and amazingly, you won’t get zero results. While almost no companies still test on animals inside the U.S. and the practice has been officially banned in the E.U., there’s one major reason you’re still going to get all those hits: China. “China’s regulatory agencies require animal testing of imported cosmetics and domestically manufactured ones, with some exceptions,” says Erin Hill, a cofounder and the president of the Institute for In Vitro Sciences, a company that promotes non-animal testing. Hill recently signed a memorandum of understanding with the Chinese government on adopting nonanimal testing methods. In other words, she’s lobbying against the country’s animal- testing mandate. “One reason the Chinese authorities are cautious about changing regulations is that the burden of safety in China…