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EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
 / Culture & Literature
American History

American History

April 2020

Get American History digital magazine subscription today and see how the American experience comes alive through thoroughly researched stories, outstanding photography and artwork. The magazine’s lively storytelling, thought-provoking essays and more bring America’s past alive in every issue.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
HistoryNet
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

1 min.
american history online exclusives

Visit Historynet.com/American-History and search for online-only stories like these: Liberia: Born Out of Bondage Africa’s first black-governed republic began as a scheme to rid the United States of free African Americans. bit.ly/LiberiaExperiment Swamped Pacific Ambitions Competing for Samoa, the U.S., the U.K., and Germany sailed into a storm. bit.ly/StormOverSamoa How New England Got Rich on Slavery The righteous region’s profound role in buying, selling, and transporting slaves. bit.ly/NewEnglandSlavery Love history? Sign up for our FREE monthly e-newsletter at: historynet.com/newsletters FOLLOW US AT facebook.com/American HistoryMag…

1 min.
american history

MICHAEL A. REINSTEIN CHAIRMAN & PUBLISHER DAVID STEINHAFEL PUBLISHER ALEX NEILL EDITOR IN CHIEF MICHAEL DOLAN EDITOR NANCY TAPPAN SENIOR EDITOR SARAH RICHARDSON SENIOR EDITOR STEPHEN KAMIFUJI CREATIVE DIRECTOR BRIAN WALKER GROUP ART DIRECTOR JON C. BOCK ART DIRECTOR MELISSA A. WINN DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY CORPORATE DOUG NEIMAN CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER ROB WILKINS DIRECTOR OF PARTNERSHIP MARKETING TOM GRIFFITHS CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT GRAYDON SHEINBERG CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT SHAWN BYERS VP AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT JAMIE ELLIOTT PRODUCTION DIRECTOR ADVERTISING MORTON GREENBERG SVP Advertising Sales mgreenberg@mco.com TERRY JENKINS Regional Sales Manager tjenkins@historynet.com RICK GOWER Regional Sales Manager rick@rickgower.com…

6 min.
mosaic

Credit Where Credit’s Due A curator at the Library of Congress studying Civil War-era photographers found that a well-known image of Abraham Lincoln’s March 1861 inauguration was taken by a federal employee named John Wood, not Civil War photographer and Mathew Brady associate Alexander Gardner, as long thought. Adrienne Lundgren in her research had noticed that John Wood’s images resembled the inauguration photo in size and perspective. Lundgren clinched her case when she found that a photo by Wood was credited as the basis for a lithograph of James Buchanan’s 1857 inauguration. U.S. Army engineer Montgomery Meigs had hired Wood to document government projects such as the completion of the U.S. Capitol dome and the extension of the building’s wings and dome that Meigs was overseeing. Fortunes in Black and White New data…

1 min.
contributors

The late Kenny Kemp (“Battle of Los Angeles,” p. 42)—attorney, surfer, pilot, jazzman, and author—contributed to several History-net magazines, here most recently with “Standoff in the Sand” (June 2016). He died in 2018. Stephen Kinzer (Poisoner in Chief,” p. 58), a senior fellow at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, is a former New York Times correspondent. His books include All the Shah’s Men (2003), The Brothers (2013), and The True Flag (2017). He last contributed “Titan on Titan Tumult” (October 2017). stephen-kinzer.com Besides his “SCOTUS 101” column, Daniel B. Moskowitz (“Soldierly Swing,” p. 34) regularly reviews books and contributes articles to this and other Historynet titles. His most recent American History feature was the online exclusive “Mustard Gas Medical Myth” (December 2018, bit.ly/MedicalMyth). Historian and author Rosemarie Ostler (“Saving…

1 min.
letters

Enlightening Some of your articles are so interesting that I can see them as novels. I especially enjoyed “Pattern Recognition” (December 2019), which profiles Andrew Jackson Downing, who I mention in my book, Selections from Across Two Novembers: A Bibliographic Year. I download the magazine from the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled program. David Faucheux Lafayette, Louisiana EDITOR’S REPLY: We’re delighted American History is offered by this free service. To enroll: nlsbard.loc.gov/login//NLS. Hidden Gears In “Hard-Knock College” (February 2020), Joseph Connor writes that the Electoral College was designed “by the Founding Fathers with the best of intentions.” However, two compromises at the Constitutional Convention of 1787—the 3/5 compromise and the final agreement on an electoral college system—worked in tandem to augment the South’s political power in the central government. This resulted, between…

5 min.
black pioneers

Anna-Lisa Cox is a non-resident fellow at Harvard University’s Hutchins Center for African and African American Research. Her work has underpinned two exhibits at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Cox’s latest book, The Bone and Sinew of the Land: America’s Black Pioneers and the Struggle for Equality (Public Affairs, $28), chronicles how free African Americans helped settle the Northwest Territory in the early 1800s. She says mainstream historians cling to a myth that whites settled the Midwest when long before emancipation the frontier Northwest Territory states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin were home to tens of thousands of free African Americans flourishing on their own land. Who were these pioneers? Most came as free people, some from families that had been free since the…