EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Cars & Motorcycles
AutocarAutocar

Autocar August 28, 2019

Autocar is the car nut’s weekly fix, delivering you a unique mix of the latest news, opinion, features, first drives of new cars and in-depth road tests – all complemented by the best photography in the business. No other magazine covers the subject you love with such enthusiasm, insight and quality every week of the year. Autocar stands for the highest quality in car journalism – and is rewarded with access to the best new cars and the biggest news stories before any of the opposition which we share with you, our readers, every week.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Haymarket Media Group Ltd
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
BUY ISSUE
£4(Incl. tax)
SUBSCRIBE
£100(Incl. tax)
51 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
autocar

EDITORIAL Email autocar@haymarket.com Editor Mark Tisshaw Editorial director, Automotive Jim Holder Editor-in-chief Steve Cropley Managing editor Damien Smith Editor-at-large Matt Prior Deputy editor James Attwood Deputy editor – digital Rachel Burgess Deputy digital editor Tom Morgan Road test editor Matt Saunders Road testers Simon Davis, Richard Lane News editor Lawrence Allan Junior reporter Felix Page Used cars editor Mark Pearson Used cars reporter Max Adams Chief sub-editor Sami Shah Group art editor Stephen Hopkins Art editor Sarah Özgül Designer Rebecca Stevens Prepress manager Darren Jones Senior photographer Luc Lacey Photographer Olgun Kordal Junior photographer Max Edleston Head of video Mitch McCabe Junior videographer Oli Kosbab Video apprentice Tej Bhola SEO manager Jon Cook SEO executive Oliver Hayman Picture editor Ben Summerell-Youde EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS European editor Greg Kable Used car correspondent James Ruppert Senior contributing writer Andrew Frankel Senior contributing editor Richard Bremner Contributing editor Mike Duff Senior consulting editor Tom Evans Features apprentice Harry Roberts Special correspondents Mauro Calo, Jesse Crosse, James Disdale, John Evans, Colin Goodwin, Hilton…

access_time1 min.
words change but the definition of driving pleasure will not

RECENTLY, JAGUAR APPEALED to the Oxford English Dictionary to change the definition of a car. According to the OED, a car is “a road vehicle powered by a motor (usually an internal combustion engine)”. Jaguar wants that to be updated given the rise of electric cars – including the I-Pace, which we’ve just added to our long-term fleet (p64). Car terminology is becoming dated. For example, the Porsche Taycan is set to have Turbo and Turbo S variants – despite lacking an engine and turbochargers. Away from EVs, four-door SUV coupés are on the rise, despite dictionaries insisting a coupé has only two doors. The meaning of words change over time. As electric cars become the norm, long-standing terminology will adjust with it. What’s key for us driving enthusiasts is that, while…

access_time4 min.
jag could resurrect c-x75 supercar as all-new f-type

Jaguar is favouring a mid-engined layout for the next-generation F-Type – and it is set to revive a number of design cues from the ill-fated C-X75 concept. The brand’s designers and engineers are mulling key decisions about the direction of the next-generation Porsche 911 rival, chief among which is whether to stick with the current front-mid-engined layout or reinvent it as an electrified – or even pure electric – model with a mid-mounted powertrain. Autocar understands that the latter is favoured by those close to the project. Speaking recently to Autocar, now former design director Ian Callum revealed he had laid out a blueprint for the next generation of sports car in collaboration with his successor, Julian Thomson. “We could get quite close [to the C-X75],” Callum said. “There’s still a formula within…

access_time1 min.
today’s f-type gets a new look, too

Before the Jaguar F-Type evolves into a new generation, efforts to update the current six-year-old design are well under way. Recent prototypes show a significant rethink to the sports car’s front-end design, with slim headlights similar to those on the facelifted XE saloon drafted in, alongside a redesigned grille, new bonnet shape and tweaks to the rear light design. The interior is expected to be a step forward, too, with some of the advanced infotainment features seen in the XE and I-Pace brought in. The biggest mechanical change will be found under the engine bay. Ford will stop producing JLR’s 5.0-litre supercharged V8 next year, and the F-Type is tipped to receive a BMW-sourced 4.4-litre V8 in its place. Lesser variants will also get a new unit in the form of…

access_time4 min.
new c-class to get limo tech

The next Mercedes-Benz C-Class has been redesigned from the ground up, with highly efficient new hybrid drivetrains and advanced autonomous driving technology set to be some of its key draws. Having experienced a sharp drop in C-Class sales in recent years because of the universal gravitation of buyers towards SUVs, the German maker is providing the fifth-generation model with many of the developments being readied for the new S-Class. The new C-Class, codenamed W206, will challenge the recently facelifted Audi A4 and new BMW 3 Series when it arrives in UK showrooms in 2021. As evidenced by the latest prototypes, the design of the new C-Class is a clear evolution of the styling seen on today’s model. Although its exterior features a new-look front end with more angular headlights, the new car’s…

access_time1 min.
a-class and b-class plug-in hybrids to hit uk soon

Available to order from early October, the A250e (also available in saloon form) and B250e are powered by a 1.3-litre four-cylinder petrol engine and a 101bhp electric motor. The combined output is 215bhp, with 332lb ft of torque quoted. The 15.6kWh lithium ion battery provides an electric-only range of between 35 and 42 miles, with an 80% charge from 10% possible in 25 minutes from a rapid charger. Both models make use of the more versatile CCS charging system, too. The A250e can cover 0-62mph in 6.6sec, with the B250e taking 6.8sec. Top speed is 146mph for the hatchbacks and 149mph for the saloon. Both models weigh 150kg more than the equivalent petrol example, but Mercedes claims boot space isn’t greatly affected. UK prices have yet to be confirmed, but an increase of…

help