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CAR UKCAR UK

CAR UK

October 2019

Every month CAR interviews the stars of motorsport, demystifies the latest in-car technology and shares our writers’ passion for car culture and car design. Discover the world’s newest and most exciting cars: join us to drive everything from supercars and hot hatches to family cars.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
H BAUER PUBLISHING LIMITED
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time3 min.
welcome

‘Your car will be free: free to commit to the pursuit of hedonism’ Everywhere you turn, the car as we know and love it looks to be on borrowed time. In The Economist , a story on the post-car European city raises the very valid point that, by virtue of pre-dating the automobile, the European city was never going to get on well with the car: streets too narrow and labyrinthine, little spare space… Just as it was a nicer, more humane place before the advent of widespread car ownership, the European city will be better off after it, and not just in the obvious ways. Yes pollution, both air and noise, will be reduced, but the democratisation of green, quiet and open spaces within the urban environment is undoubtedly also…

access_time5 min.
evil twins

There were two ways Audi could’ve played it with its new RS6 Avant estate and RS7 fastback, which both arrive early next year. One was a switch to plug-in hybrid technology, the second was to polish what they already had, like the nervy work experience kid dusting Audi’s Le Mans silverware. Well, early adopters run for your Teslas, because Audi has clung to the familiar. Not that this is necessarily a bad thing, and there are enticing reasons to trade up from your existing RS, as CAR’s recent chat with chassis expert Andrei Filep and exterior designer Francesco D’Amore revealed. Prices are still TBC, but expect around £90k for the RS6, closer to £100k for the RS7. The 4.0-litre V8 continues, now with 3mm larger twin turbos running an extra 0.25 bar…

access_time2 min.
merc sticks with trad engines... r-class reborn... four-door coupe c-class...

Mercedes doesn’t share VW’s conviction that take-up of electric cars will be widespread and swift. Sure, there are 11 new Mercedes EVs due for launch in 2019-21, but there’s a major programme of internal-combustion development continuing in parallel. A product-planning insider explains the thinking: ‘If EVs take off like a rocket in the next two years, Mercedes would indeed be caught off-guard. But we expect a more gradual transition.’ Compact cars being planned now are designed to be agnostic about their power source – similar to the PSA approach. Running EV and ICE teams simultaneously is an expensive business, so savings are being made by reducing the number of low-selling variants in the line-up. For instance, there’s a plan to create one coupe to replace the GT 4-Door, CLS and SL Coupe.…

access_time1 min.
new m4: 2020’s junior m8

1 SHAPELY SIBLING Literally no one will be surprised that a svelte coupe version of the M3 is coming too. The new M4 will be the more dramatic-looking, less practical option, offered in coupe, convertible and four-door Gran Coupe body styles to complement the 2020 M3’s saloon-only approach. 2 AS SEEN ON X3 The M4’s engine will be the 3.0-litre straight-six S58, a new performance derivative of the B58. It’s already made its debut in the new X3 and X4 M (below). A sign of the times that SUVs get the sweet engine before the coupe? Maybe, but it’s certainly a smart way to spread the costs. The M5’s selectable rear- or all-wheel-drive system will be included, for lairy slides or barnacle-like grip. 3 AS THE DRIVEN SNOW BMW has been promising that the M3/4…

access_time2 min.
dark times ahead for aston martin?

⊲ Is Aston Martin going bankrupt all over again? Not yet: but like its most famous customer in Goldfinger , the laser is heading straight for its testicles and CEO Andy Palmer will need to do something smart – and soon – to switch it off. ⊲ But when it floated a year ago, Aston nearly joined the FTSE100. What went wrong? An £80m loss and slumping sales caused the share price to plummet The flotation valued Aston at £4.3bn, and returned £1.1bn to its Italian and Kuwaiti private-equity owners. That valuation was based on the glorious future envisioned in Palmer’s ‘Second Century’ plan, in which a seven-model line-up including SUVs, saloons and EVs doubles Aston’s volumes to 14,000 cars by 2023, finally giving it the scale and stability it has always lacked. That plan…

access_time3 min.
formula 1, le mans, daytona… dakar?

A POST-F1 CAREER LIKE NO OTHER TAKES A NEW TURN As this issue of CAR goes on sale, Fernando Alonso is due to be competing in his first ever desert race as part of his preparation for a possible entry in January’s Dakar Rally. It’s the latest twist in the utterly unpredictable post-F1 career of the two-times world champion. And it really could go either way. Nobody’s disputing that he has the talent and the ambition. He’s the reigning World Endurance Champion, also has a win under his belt in the Daytona 24 Hours and has won Le Mans twice, including victory on his first attempt. But then again, he failed to qualify for this year’s Indy 500. Plenty of rally drivers (Sainz, Loeb…) have done well in the desert, but very few…

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