EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Boating & Aviation
Classic BoatClassic Boat

Classic Boat December 2018

Admire the world's most beautiful boats, brought to life through breath-taking photography. Classic Boat offers a unique blend of yacht reviews, seamanship and restoration features, history and design columns, practical advice and coverage of the leading international regattas and events. Whether your interest lies in working on restoration projects or sailing in classic regattas; whether you're a wooden boat owner or simply an admirer of traditional marine workmanship, Classic Boat will have something for you.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Chelsea Magazine
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
BUY ISSUE
£4(Incl. tax)
SUBSCRIBE
£40(Incl. tax)
12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
warm beer and empty seas

After the long heatwave summer across the northern hemisphere, autumn has finally arrived. The leaves are on fire, owners are busy laying up and across the land you might hear the traditional sounds of boats being moved about the yard and brought into the shed to be readied for 2019. Those who stay in the water will reap the rewards of those cold, high-pressure days when no one’s around and there’s enough of a breeze blowing to make it worthwhile. Those who haul out will be rewarded by warm fires and warm beer (in England at least). In this issue we cover the life and work of one of the greatest dinghy designers – the late Ian Proctor. Can there be any among us who’ve not sailed at least one of…

access_time7 min.
the perfect panacea

It was in the spring of 2005 that the first boat was launched to a new design by Ed Burnett. Frolic, a 23ft 1in (7m) gaff cutter, had been built by Hegarty’s Boatyard in Ireland to a design that had evolved as a result of a series of conversations between Ed and his father. “This little cutter started life as several different boats,” Ed later wrote in Watercraft magazine. “Typically, the conversation would begin with ‘Why don’t you design something like….?’ or ‘What I want now is….’ Either statement would, of course, be followed by a brief quite different from that which he had delivered the previous month, week or perhaps even just prior to lunch.” Eventually, Ed decided to “keep things simple and versatile” and produce “a straightforward and…

access_time1 min.
oga shindig

The OGA celebrated its 55th birthday in style with a party for all members on the River Medina, on the Isle of Wight. More than 100 boats and 250 crew participated in a weekend of events, based at The Folly Inn, the river’s well-known waterside pub. Regional OGA fleets cruised in company to the event from around the UK and from France and the Netherlands. The 1888 William Crossfield yawl Bonita won a race in brisk Solent conditions on the Saturday, with almost 70 boats entering. Meanwhile fun on the river included sculling lessons and then races, a home-made log boat competition (following regional heats), Smacks Boat races and try-outs of the new Wolstenholme-designed OGA dinghy. There was also a ‘bake-off’ competition and auction in aid of the OGA’s youth fund.…

access_time13 min.
tell tales

GOLDEN GLOBE RACE 2018 Solo sailor rescued in Southern Ocean after dismasting Mayday French solo yachtsman Loïc Lepage is the latest competitor in the Golden Globe to retire from the race, after he was rescued at sea, as we were going to press. He triggered the EPIRB on his Nicholson 32 yacht Laaland on 20 October, after being dismasted 600 miles south west of Perth, Australia. Loïc had been sailing in 25-knot winds and 10ft (3m) seas when the incident occured. After cutting away the rigging, the 62-year-old sailor from Vannes, Brittany, discovered the boat was leaking at 30 litres an hour, from hull damage caused by a section of the broken mast. Loïc was transferred from his yacht by the Japanese bulk carrier Shiosai at 00:53 GMT on 22 October. The…

access_time4 min.
the rating debate

The heated debate over the future of the CIM rule was talk of the pontoons in October at Les Voiles de Saint-Tropez, where leading French sailor Bruno Troublé followed up his proposals for change by issuing a memo to all regatta participants titled: “The CIM rule: is it fair?” Here he sums up his thoughts and responds to criticism of his plans by Luigi Lang in our last issue. “A year after our initial proposals, there is still a huge question mark over the CIM rule (Comité International de la Méditerranée). A lot of owners reacted positively to the AFYT (French Association of Classic Yachts) survey last year: a huge majority are willing to test another rule, such as an amended IRC or ORC, while continuing with the CIM results for…

access_time3 min.
generous champion of swedish classic yachting

Olle Appelberg, a champion of Swedish classic yachting and a well-known figure in the wider classic world, died in September aged 68. His death came just weeks after one of his most successful events, a regatta in Mariefred for boats aged 100 years or more. Those who attended the regatta and countless people in the classic yachting community have been left shocked and saddened. Olle was a man totally committed to ensuring that the Swedish heritage of classic wooden boats was appreciated and preserved. He used his professional skills as a journalist and publicist to inspire enthusiasm for the ownership and especially the racing of the whole range of Scandinavian traditional craft. Only those really close to him knew how tirelessly he worked, whether leading from the front or organising behind…

help