EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Cars & Motorcycles
Evo

Evo June 2017

Produced by world-class motoring journalists and racers, evo communicates the raw emotion of owning, driving and testing the world’s greatest performance cars. Bringing together informative car reviews, vivid photography, exciting track tests and dramatic drive stories in glorious landscapes, evo is considered the bible for performance car enthusiasts.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dennis Publishing UK
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12 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
ed speak

WHAT DO YOU PRIORITISE IN A PERFORMANCE CAR? I ask simply because this month the industry seems to be back to chasing horsepower (and with the onslaught of turbocharging, obscene torque, too), with a hot hatch from Audi now generating as much shove as a 5-litre V8-engined E39 M5 and a hypercar that produces near-enough 1500bhp without an electric motor in sight. Power is a corruptive force. Addictive, dangerous, adrenalinfuelling and at times scary. We can’t get enough of it. Whether we’re behind the wheel of something genuinely powerful – McLaren’s 570S Track Pack (driven on page 32) springs to mind – or standing behind the catch-fencing watching a 7-litre Cobra being muscled, drifted and encouraged through Goodwood’s Madgwick corner, inside wheel hanging in the air, driver wrestling with give-or-take 450bhp, it’s…

7 min.
the state of the british motoring nation

DESPITE THE COUNTLESS TRIALS and tribulations of its indigenous car makers over the past few decades, Britain remains an attractive location in which to design, engineer and manufacture the sort of sports and premium cars that fill the pages of evo. In fact, whatever ugly truths lie behind the neglect and even collapse of many famous British marques, their inherent ‘Britishness’, or at least the perception of its best parts, has encouraged substantial foreign investment in their salvation. And as important to those investors as the nameplates themselves is the need to continue producing those cars on British soil. So we’re taking a quick look at the current fortunes of British-based car makers; those that crop up on evo’s radar, at any rate. They range from giants such as Jaguar Land…

2 min.
new arrivals

REMOVING WEIGHT FROM SOMETHING as ethereal as the Elise can’t be an easy task, but the engineers at Potash Lane have managed it with the new Lotus Elise Sprint (1), trimming an already insubstantial car down to a 798kg dry weight. “Toyota’s Gazoo Racing chief is keen to bring back an MR2- sized sports car, with a mid-mounted engine still an option” It’s the first time the Elise has dipped into the ‘sevens’ since the flyweight first-generation model, (which still mocks the Sprint’s middle-aged spread with a 731kg with-fluids figure) and is the result of the use of carbonfibre for the seats and engine cover, a lithium-ion battery and other improvements borrowed from models such as the Exige. It gets that car’s intricate exposed gearlever assembly, too. Heavier is the price: £37,300…

3 min.
aston’s awfully big adventure

TOWARDS THE END OF 2016, ASTON Martin bought 90 acres of the Vale of Glamorgan in south Wales following a deal struck between Aston CEO Andy Palmer and Welsh first minister Carwyn Jones. The land, just to the west of Cardiff Airport at a place called St Athan, came with buildings that had been occupied by the Ministry of Defence, including three enormous aircraft ‘superhangers’. Beginning with reception areas, offices and a staff restaurant, these are now being ‘re-purposed’ as Aston’s St Athan production facility, where its first SUV, based on the DBX concept, will be built as part of a £200million investment programme. We asked Palmer, why here, why now? ‘Why Wales? We actually went to 20 different sites around the world – a number of them in the United…

2 min.
city concours tickets on sale

LONDON IS THIS SUMMER to play host to an all-new event showcasing ‘some of the world’s most incredible cars’. Held on 8-9 June, the City Concours will see the immaculate five-acre lawn of the Honourable Artillery Company (a short walk from Liverpool Street station) flooded with glamorous road and racing machinery from bygone eras to the present day, and there will also be a selection of sports cars for sale from specialist dealers. The show, organised by the same team behind the annual Concours of Elegance (this year at Hampton Court Palace), is presented in association with evo’s sistermagazine Octane. Assuming the fickle British weather holds, guests can expect to get up close to F1 cars from the 1970s, ’80s and ’90s as well as the beautiful but viciously challenging machines…

3 min.
2017 car tax rates explained

ALL NEW CARS SOLD IN THE UK ARE now subject to revised Vehicle Excise Duty (VED) rules. In short, while owners will still pay their first year of VED based on a car’s CO2 rating, the rate for subsequent years is now fixed at £140. The exceptions are cars using an alternative fuel source (e.g. hybrids), which get a £10 discount, zero-emissions cars, which attract a £0 rate, and cars with a list price of over £40,000, which incur an additional £310 charge in years two to six. It’s worth noting that the £310 surcharge applies to zero-emissions cars, too. Bad luck, Tesla owners. So if your purchase is middling in terms of its price and CO2 rating, you’ll not be too badly affected by the changes. For example, a 139g/km…