Does Windows 12 mean it’s all over for Windows 11?

Does Windows 12 mean it’s all over for Windows 11?

While you could never quite set your watch to Windows releases, you always roughly knew that there would be a new version every three years. Windows Vista came out in early 2007, Windows 7 in late 2009, Windows 8 in late 2012, and Windows 10 in the middle of 2015. True, there was a gap of over five years between XP and Vista, but that was unusual. After previous flops (notably Windows Me), Microsoft was reluctant to replace a system that was hugely popular with users and businesses. Then everything changed with Windows 10 - or it appeared to. Microsoft said it would be the final version of Windows, meaning the company would regularly update it with features but never fully replace it with a brand new system. It stuck to this…

HOW TO… Destroy an old hard drive

What you need: Old hard drive; precision toolkit Time required: One hour Your hard drive is full of sensitive data. The emails, photos and browsing history scattered across its disks present an intimate portrait of your daily life. An identity thief would love to get their hands on it, so it’s vital that you take extra care when disposing of old drives. Recycle your old laptop with the hard drive intact, and your files will be easy to recover, even if you’ve formatted it. This is because when you format a drive you don’t touch the files it contains: all you do is wipe the table of contents that Windows uses to locate them. For an analogy, imagine you bought a second-hand book from which someone had torn out the index. Although it…

HOW TO… Destroy an old hard drive
Letters

Letters

Above-inflation price rises shouldn’t be allowed next year I can’t say I’m holding my breath for any help from broadband providers on the cost of living (Issue 636, page 9). Raising awareness of their social tariffs is positive, but what about the millions of people in low-paid jobs? The only way providers can seriously help those is to scrap their inflation-linked price rises. I think the public swallowed these increases this year, albeit reluctantly, because it was the first big rises for a long time, if ever. It almost seemed like a novelty. But there’s no way they should be allowed to get away with it next year. Consumer groups should start putting pressure on them now. I know providers say that they need this investment in order to hit the Government’s gigabit…

SUNDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Line of Duty 9.00pm BBC1 DRAMA OF THE WEEK “Sometimes you don’t lose, son, you just run out of time,” a defeated Ted (Adrian Dunbar) sighed last week. It certainly feels like time has run out for AC-12 as DCS Carmichael (Anna Maxwell Martin) hovers balefully in the wings, a woman who could make staring through glass partitions into performance art. It’s the end of an era. Jed Mercurio has delivered a blockbuster of a sixth series and the cast — Dunbar especially — have risen to the job of leading us by the nose through his maze of a plot. Now we must learn where that maze leads, and what monster we might confront at the end. The artist formerly known as “H”, now “the fourth man”: who is…

SUNDAY Choices
Nobel’s legacy

Nobel’s legacy

What happens on 10 December? The date marks the death of Alfred Nobel, the 19th century industrialist who instituted five prizes “to those who, during the preceding year, shall have conferred the greatest benefit on mankind” – in the fields of chemistry, physics, medicine, literature and the pursuit of peace. Since 1901, the first four prizes have been handed out on that date by the Swedish monarch before the “feast of feasts”, a royal gala banquet in Stockholm; in 1969, another prize, in economics, was added to them in Nobel’s memory to celebrate the 300th birthday of the Swedish central bank. On the same day, the peace prize is awarded in Oslo at a rather less grand celebration. Who was Alfred Nobel? He was a vastly successful chemist, engineer and businessman. Born into…

MONDAY Choices

MONDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Viewpoint 9.00pm ITV DRAMA New series There are some early, uncomfortable (though accidental) real-life parallels at the start of Ed Whitmore’s thriller when a young woman disappears. There are appeals, “Missing” posters and vigils after primary-school teacher Gemma vanishes. But then we lurch into low-key thriller territory as police officer Martin Young (Noel Clarke), who’s suffered a catastrophic failure of confidence after A Bad Thing happened on another case, is brought in to conduct surveillance on Gemma’s boyfriend. Martin takes up his position in the flat of young mum Zoe (No Offence’s Alexandra Roach) on the opposite side of the street. But he quickly compromises himself after he responds to a family emergency, while Zoe seems to have a surveillance mission of her own. Viewpoint is more Front Window than Rear…

WHY YOU MUST BUY A MINI PC

WHY YOU MUST BUY A MINI PC

Actual size! If you tried balancing a computer on your palm a few years ago you’d be risking a night in A&E. Even so-called mini PCs were heavy enough to wreck your wrist. But the latest breed of these micro machines are so small and light you can easily hold one, whether you’re posing for the front of a computer magazine or picking it up to place wherever you like. That’s one reason why mini PCs are growing in popularity. Another is that they use less electricity than their larger siblings, which helps in this era of astronomical energy bills. However, the main reason why many people love them is that you don’t lose computing power as you reduce your computer’s footprint. Attach a keyboard and mouse and you can use one as…

The UK at a glance

Liverpool Trial outdoor gig: A crowd of 5,000 people will get the chance to attend a “near-normal” outdoor gig in Liverpool next weekend as part of a government trial. The event at Sefton Park on 2 May will be headlined by the Manchester band Blossoms. The crowd will not have to wear masks or be socially distanced, but will have to take a rapid lateral flow Covid test before arriving at the event; take another test after the gig; and provide contact details to NHS Test and Trace. The concert is one of a series of pilot events, alongside an FA Cup semi-final at Wembley Stadium last weekend. However, music industry leaders complained that not enough had been done for events to go ahead; organisers of the 70,000-person Boomtown festival near…

The UK at a glance

Cancel your software subscriptions

Many software companies now allow users to pay for their products by monthly subscription. The benefits are that you can cancel at any time without having to fork out a big sum upfront, and get updated with new features and bug fixes as soon as they become available. On the downside, companies can increase the subscription price at any time, and with the cost-of-living crisis placing a heavy strain on our finances, paid-for programs are a relative luxury compared with food and energy. In this feature, we suggest seven software subscriptions you should cancel and the best free alternatives to use instead. Cancel Adobe Acrobat DC www.snipca.com/42623 Price £13.14 per month Although Adobe’s Acrobat Reader is free to use (and you need it to open pages in our Back Issue CD), if you want…

Cancel your software subscriptions
WHAT ALPINA DOES NEXT

WHAT ALPINA DOES NEXT

It was the first time that BMW had approached the owners of Alpina to ask them if they would like to sell the brand, but the timing was astute. “The risks for small manufacturers are going up massively,” says Andreas Bovensiepen, who with his brother Florian runs Alpina, the company their father founded to tune BMWs back in 1965. “But the opportunities aren’t increasing in the same way.” Over an hour with Autocar, Bovensiepen outlines the dilemma facing Alpina, which from its modest tuning and racing roots has become an independent manufacturer in its own right, making fast, luxurious and discreet cars that are 80% finished in BMW factories, owing to a close partnership with the Munich firm. There’s a burgeoning order book: Alpina sold a record 2000 cars last year and expects…

A STEADY DRIP, DRIP, DRIP

A STEADY DRIP, DRIP, DRIP

Here at T3, when we talk about coffee makers, we generally mean espresso machines and bean-to-cup machines, because that’s what we generally get sent. Espresso, after all, is the most high-tech, expensive and sophisticated (or poncey, if you prefer) way to make coffee, and the results from the best machines are exceptional. It’s not by any means the only way to make coffee however – even the humble cafetiere and stovetop percolator can make a damn fine cup. And then there’s filter coffee makers such as this very fine specimen from Zwilling (£159, zwilling.com). Bearing the rather unimaginative name of Drip Coffee Maker, this vision in glass, LCD and plastique is part of the award-winning Enfinigy range. Yes, we know that sounds like a recently defunct electricity company; just go with…

Europe at a glance

Dublin Mountbatten apology: Sinn Féin has for the first time apologised for the IRA’s assassination of Lord Mountbatten in 1979. Speaking after the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh, a nephew of Mountbatten, Sinn Féin president Mary Lou McDonald said: “I am sorry that happened”, describing the murder as “heartbreaking”. Mountbatten was on a fishing trip off the coast of Sligo when a bomb tore through his small boat, killing him and three others, including his 14-year-old grandson and a 15-year-old local boy. McDonald’s predecessor, Gerry Adams, had previously expressed regret for the murder, but said that Mountbatten had known the risk of visiting Ireland. Berlin A Green Chancellor?: In a reflection of its growing strength, Germany’s Green party has, for the first time, nominated a candidate to stand as chancellor in September’s…

Europe at a glance
SATURDAY Choices

SATURDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Duran Duran: Radio 2 in Concert 9.00pm BBC2 MUSIC It seems like every time you turn on the TV at the moment, Duran Duran are there. Fresh off the back of their appearances at the Platinum Jubilee and the Commonwealth Games opening ceremony, this latest outing is a televised version of the band’s December 2021 Radio 2 concert. Simon Le Bon struts his way through many of the band’s greatest hits — Hungry like the Wolf, A View to a Kill, Ordinary World etc — that have riffs and synths that, 30 or 40 years or so on from their release, are still as arresting. Newer material from their latest album, Future Past, released in October 2021, shows how they have continued to evolve, teaming up with collaborators including British…

LeTteR bocks

◻PLEASE find attached this trademark from a box of eggs, which appears to show a chicken lifting its leg to crack off an eggy one. Susan Butcher, Australia ◻FORMER Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been criticised for meeting an ex-KGB agent without his officials present when he was foreign secretary. But I don’t think there was ever any security threat. The meeting took place at a Bunga Bunga party in an Italian castle with loads of booze, drugs and prostitutes, for heaven’s sake. They weren’t going to be standing around talking about work. Hector Popkiss, Luton ◻WHY IS it that women with itchy fannies can buy Vagisil, but there is no equivalent product for men? Quite frankly, I could do with applying a squirt of ‘Bollosil’ to my nuts most mornings. If sex equality…

LeTteR bocks
M3 to turn ‘groundbreaking’ EV but retain traditional feel

M3 to turn ‘groundbreaking’ EV but retain traditional feel

“They will be so groundbreaking that you will say: ‘This is crazy. I didn’t see that coming’” BMW’s M performance division is preparing to launch its final purecombustion sports car in its 50th year, before embarking on a rapid-fire electrification programme that will bring the most powerful M5 yet, a Lamborghini Urusbaiting SUV and, ultimately, an electric successor to the M3. It has been a busy year so far for BMW’s performance arm, which has already revealed the stripped-back M4 CSL, the M3 Touring estate and its first endurance racer in 23 years, the V8 Hybrid LMDh. But still to come is the production version of the 740bhp XM hybrid SUV and long-awaited second-generation M2 Coupé. The upcoming M2 Coupé will be the final ‘full-fat’ M car to go without electric assistance, driven…

EASTER DAY

EASTER DAY

PICK OF THE DAY The Thief, His Wife and the Canoe 9.00pm ITV DRAMA New series The bizarre true story of insurance fraudster John Darwin, who in 2002 faked his own death by staging a kayaking accident off the Durham coast, is dramatised this week in four parts by Chris Lang, creator of the classy Unforgotten. Bedsit landlords John and his wife Anne (Eddie Marsan and Monica Dolan) have overinvested and are heading for bankruptcy; to avoid that, he concocts the scheme that will ruin their oblivious sons’ lives. What feels like a clumsy-criminal farce when John lays down his idea the purposes of phase one of my plan, we will need to remind people of my historic love of canoeing”) soon becomes a grim and tawdry tale: he is a seedy, narcissistic manipulator…

RIDING A WAVE OF HAPPINESS BINKY FELSTEAD AND MAX FREDRIK DARNTON SEAL THEIR LOVE WITH THEIR DREAM WEDDING IN CORFU

Skimming across the waves in a speedboat to a romantic cliffside ceremony, beautiful bride Binky Felstead had her “something blue” in the form of the sparkling Mediterranean Sea as she and Max Fredrik Darnton celebrated their love with their dream wedding in Corfu last week. “I felt like a queen as I arrived,” says Binky, as the happy couple exclusively share with HELLO! photos and memories from their big day on 22 July – which came almost a year to the day after they tied the knot in a civil ceremony in Chelsea last summer. “One of our favourite songs was playing on the boat and people on the beach were cheering and clapping. It was such a special moment.” Her groom Max, 33, was watching her arrival from the stunning garden…

RIDING A WAVE OF HAPPINESS BINKY FELSTEAD AND MAX FREDRIK DARNTON SEAL THEIR LOVE WITH THEIR DREAM WEDDING IN CORFU
WEDNESDAY Choices

WEDNESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY The Bay 9.00pm ITV DRAMA This is as much a family drama as it is a whodunnit, and episode four devotes a fair amount of screen time to affecting funeral scenes that see Saif’s body being washed prior to his burial and mum Mariam (Rina Mahoney) breaking down in grief. Usually, suspects in police procedurals become little more than headshots on an incident board, but the Rahmans now seem like real human beings. And that’s all to The Bay’s credit. As for the investigation — well, we learn that stab victim Jordan Rooney (Conor Lowson) has come to and put Adnan (Michael Karim) in the frame for his attack. Though I think the solution to Saif’s murder will arrive from leftfield. At the moment, the family of girlfriend Molly have…

SCRAPHEAP CHALLENGE

SCRAPHEAP CHALLENGE

I suspect Alfie and Olive have seen it all before. The two powerfully built Belgian Draft horses stand at a gate like those critics on the Muppet Show, peering down on another star-struck visitor gawping at their owner’s 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera ‘RS 3.0’ (in quotation marks because it’s not all it appears). It’s one of three RSs and near-RSs of this era that Josh Sadler keeps in his outbuildings. This October will be 50 years since the first 911 Carrera RS was unveiled at the 1972 Paris motor show. By the end of the model’s production run, one year later, almost 1600 examples had been built and a legend born – one that would inspire ever more powerful successors, albeit none quite so special as the original. We’re accustomed to rare…

FRIDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Great British Menu: Banquet Special 8.00pm BBC2 FOOD On a mercifully bright and not-too-chilly Sunday in April, Jodrell Bank in Cheshire played host to the GBM’s socially distanced banquet celebrating the UK’s scientific innovations and marking 30 years since Sir Timothy Berners-Lee made the internet freely available to the world. It was the programme’s first ever outdoor banquet, with the food being served to guests in an open-sided marquee that had a view of the Lovell Telescope. The menu is fabulous, obviously, even if Matthew Fort, Oliver Peyton and Rachel Khoo didn’t pick your personal favourite dish. But as well as great cooking there’s been creative presentation. So many clever interpretations of the brief using theatrical props and atmospheric music, although some — Alex Bond’s apple-shaped pre-dessert presented in an…

FRIDAY Choices

The main stories……and how they were covered

What happened Cummings’s revenge Boris Johnson came under growing pressure this week to explain how the refurbishment of his Downing Street flat was paid for, amid Labour claims that he was trying to orchestrate a cover-up. It was one of several allegations levelled at the PM: he was also accused by unidentified sources of having screamed last autumn: “No more f**king lockdowns – let the bodies pile high.” The PM’s trouble began when No. 10 sources accused his former aide Dominic Cummings of being behind a series of damaging leaks, including of text messages between the PM and the businessman Sir James Dyson (see page 22). Days later, Cummings hit back with an incendiary blog post in which he denied the charge – and accused the PM of incompetence and impropriety. He claimed…

The main stories……and how they were covered
TUESDAY Choices

TUESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Our Yorkshire Farm 9.00pm Channel 5 DOCUMENTARY For many Our Yorkshire Farm fans, five-year-old Clemmy is a star of the show, with her sunshine face and endless chatter. So they’ll share her mum and dad’s mix of pride and anxiety as she leaves Ravenseat Farm in the Dales for her first day at school. You might remember that last year Amanda and Clive Owen decided to keep Clemmy at home for another year, but now, says Amanda, Clemmy is ready. It’s back to school for all of the younger Owen children who’ve been on the farm for the months of lockdown, helping out and learning along the way. As they spend the last few days of summer together, Clemmy prepares her beloved Tony the pony for her absence, and four-year-old…

Early review of Intel 11th-gen Rocket Lake gives the chip mixed marks

Early review of Intel 11th-gen Rocket Lake gives the chip mixed marks

Intel’s 11th-gen Rocket Lake chip won’t hit shelves until the end of March, but an unexpectedly early review of a retail Core i7-11700K labels the chip as power-hungry and unable to surpass AMD’s Ryzen 7 5800X in many tests. The review, written by respected CPU expert Dr. Ian Cutress of Anandtech.com, was based on a Core i7-11700K that is presumably one of the hundreds of CPUs accidentally sold a month before launch by a German retailer. Benchmarks of the chip have been making the rounds ever since, but Cutress is the first experienced journalist to publish a review. Cutress stepped carefully in his story, avoiding mention of any information he had already been given by Intel under embargo during regular briefings for the chip. He said he informed Intel that he had the…

ELECTRIC TOOTHBRUSHES

The AI adviser Oral-B iO Series 10 Automation will one day do away with dentists, leaving robots to wash and floss our fangs. Until then, this clever cleaner’s the next best thing. Putting AI in your mouth, it tracks your brushing action across six zones, using lights atop the magnetic charging dock to show where to focus those micro-vibrations. When you’re not wielding the wand, an integrated clock indicates the best time to brush, while an app points out where you can improve your technique. £tba / oralb.co.uk BUDGET BRUSHES The value vibrator Ordo Sonic+ Skimping on oral hygiene is a fast track to fillings, but healthy teeth needn’t cost hundreds. Good for 40,000 pulses per minute, this £50 job has four modes for a cleaning experience to suit the needs of your gnashers. Soft bristles go…

ELECTRIC TOOTHBRUSHES
SATURDAY Choices

SATURDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY The Great Garden Revolution 8.15pm C4 GARDENING If your garden is less Chelsea Flower Show and more overgrown wasteland, this is the makeover show for you. Back for a second series, its idea is to inspire us to get out into our gardens and enjoy reconnecting with the natural world, but it’s aimed squarely at the novice. Down-to-earth presenters Joel Bird, Errol Reuben Fernandes and Bruce Kenneth are a cheery lot who don’t baffle us with horticultural science but instead offer wheelbarrow-loads of easy-to-follow tips and guidance. Errol’s masterclass on pruning and propagation make it look a cinch. They start with an “endless sea of gravel and weeds” in Chichester that its owners want to be transformed into an oasis of tranquillity and harmony. There are also film reports from the…

Boxing Day

PICK OF THE DAY A Very British Scandal 9.00pm BBC1 DRAMA New series The fabulous A Very English Scandal (in which Hugh Grant played Jeremy Thorpe) is a tough act to follow, and the similar title of this poignant three-part society fable might give the wrong idea. Where that bounced along with a sense of rakish farce, this tells a bleaker story of Margaret, Duchess of Argyll, and her notorious 1963 divorce case. Claire Foy is terrific as Margaret, a society beauty who burns brightly in postwar London. On a train, she bumps into louche brute Ian Campbell (Paul Bettany) whose idea of flirting is to compliment her “delicious little stammer”. They start an affair and he whisks her off to crumbling Inveraray Castle, which he will inherit along with the dukedom when his…

Boxing Day
TUESDAY Choices

TUESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Rules of the Game 9.00pm BBC1 DRAMANew series Maxine Peake fans are in clover right now. She battled through five hours of Anne and The Real Anne last week and takes the lead in this slippery crime drama that starts with episodes tonight and tomorrow. Peake plays Sam, a sharp-tongued executive at a Cheshire sportswear firm where the workplace is a whirlpool of alcohol, drugs and sexism — as the new HR director, Maya, swiftly gathers on her first day. “If you snort coke and drop a pill, you can almost forget what it’s like to work here,” an underling suggests brightly. Maya (an excellently brittle Rakhee Thakrar) likes to play things by the HR book but that’s not the company way. She starts to wonder about Sam’s role in…

SATURDAY HIGHLIGHTS

SATURDAY HIGHLIGHTS

Ainsley’s Food We Love • FOOD / 11.35am / ITV Ainsley Harriott’s delicious cookery show continues to be a bright spot in the morning schedules and today he’s dishing up food to enjoy outdoors. First up are barbecued Cypriot lamb chops, cherry tomato skewers and potato salad. Chef Joseph Denison Carey pops in and prepares tagliatelle, inspired by fresh summer flavours. While Celebrity MasterChef finalist Dev Griffin is treated to Ainsley’s sesame and ginger sea bass with Asian noodle salad. Another lovely outing from the chef, complete with his trademark singing and storytelling. ★★★★ ER • See feature, page 12 Zara & Mike • DOCUMENTARY / 9pm / Channel 5 NEW When Mike Tindall was 13 he met the Queen at school in Wakefield, Yorkshire. He couldn’t have imagined then that 20 years later he would…

WEDNESDAY Choices

WEDNESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Before We Die 9.00pm C4 DRAMA OF THE WEEK New series It’s a striking opening for a crime drama: Bristol detective Hannah leads a raid on a drug-fuelled rave and her officers arrest a young dealer, Christian (Patrick Gibson). As he is led away, he sees Hannah. “Mum!” he gasps. “What have you done?” It’s the set-up for a story that will involve Hannah and Christian in more of the kind of high-stakes across-the-lines interplay you won’t find in any parenting manuals. Hannah is played by Lesley Sharp with her air of seen-it-all wisdom and a face that is so magnificently lined and creased it must be a cinematographer’s dream. From the keep-it-in-the-family arrest (a spell in prison follows), we jump forward two years and find Hannah in an affair…

Consumeractive

Can I get a refund from PayPal Credit? Q Last November, my wife bought me a £450 set of Apple AirPod Max headphones (pictured) from eBay seller Buy It Direct Discounts (www.snipca.com/42605), paying by PayPal Credit (www.snipca.com/42606). After one set quickly became muffled, the seller emailed us a software fix, but it was for the wrong headphones. We returned them, but months later we’re still waiting for a refund. We contacted PayPal, which told us to speak to our bank. Is that right? Alan Mitchell A Since contacting us Alan has received a refund from the seller after emailing them to explain his rights under the Consumer Rights Act. So while he’s pleased with the outcome, he should never have been told by PayPal to contact his bank, which had no responsibility for…

Consumeractive
THURSDAY Choices

THURSDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Diana’s Decades 9.00pm ITV DOCUMENTARY In terms of actual distance, it’s just three miles from Coleherne Court in South Kensington to Westminster Abbey. But for Lady Diana Spencer, it would turn out to be something of a seismic trip as she went from Sloaney playgroup worker to superstar princess. A fairy tale? Well, not exactly, as Diana was upper crust to begin with (as a child she knew the Queen as “Aunt Lilibet”) and, as is recounted again here, her wedding day wasn’t exactly the stuff of dreams. In fact, she was tempted to pull out mere days before saying “I do” after learning of her husband-to-be’s friendship with Camilla Parker Bowles. But this lively new life-and-times of Di doc explores how the royal story being sold to the public…

WEDNESDAY Choices

WEDNESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY The Great British Sewing Bee 8.00pm BBC1 CRAFT Patrick Grant dressed as Rudolph the Red-nosed Reindeer — could there be a better Christmas present for Sewing Bee fans? This hilarious fancy-dress outfit is made by the Rev Kate Bottley for the transformation challenge, in the first of two celebrity editions over the holiday fortnight — with Sara Pascoe hosting now Joe Lycett has become Channel 4’s Travel Man. Anneka Rice seems to prefer using a staple gun rather than doing any actual sewing, but then, as she says, “I’m better at building a community centre.” And Ghosts’ Kiell Smith-Bynoe forgets to thread his sewing machine at one point. Antony Cotton, however, has obviously seen the show before because he puts the world’s largest bow on his made-to-measure dress — and…

FRIDAY HIGHLIGHTS

FRIDAY HIGHLIGHTS

The Rescue ● DOCUMENTARY / Disney+ NEW When a junior football team and their coach became trapped inside a flooded cave in Chiang Rai, Thailand, in 2018, the daring attempt to rescue them made headlines all over the world. This documentary tells the story from the perspective of the rescuers – ordinary recreational cave divers who turned out to be the only people with the skills and equipment to carry out such a risky mission. Director Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi expertly captures the sense of claustrophobia inside the flooded cave, while drawing out the details of the rescue by the incredibly humble heroes. ★★★★★ SP Greta ● FILM / 11.55pm (times vary) / BBC1 (not Scotland)/iPlayer PREMIERE Sweetly innocent out-of-town girl Frances (Chloë Grace Moretz) returns a lost handbag she has found on the New York…

Kia EV6 GT

Kia EV6 GT

Richard_Ingram@autovia.co.uk @rsp_ingram “Plant your foot and the EV6 pins you to your seat, with the speed building at an alarming rate” Practicality Boot (seats up/down) 480/1,260 litres Performance 0-62mph/top speed 3.5 seconds/162mph THE electric car power war shows no signs of slowing. Even some family SUVs now boast upwards of 400bhp, matched with mind-bending torque, big batteries, and dual-motors for all-wheel drive. Now it’s the turn of the Kia EV6, which has been given a once-over by former brand R&D chief-turned executive technical advisor Albert Biermann to create this GT variant. Biermann told us: “The idea with this car is for it to be a fast car, but not necessarily a true high-performance model. That’s not what the EV6 GT is about; the clue is in the name: it’s a fast grand tourer.” And we’ve now had chance to get behind the…

Horizon

1 NOTHING PHONE (1) £399, nothing.tech It’s not hard to follow the thread from OnePlus to Nothing. Indeed, OnePlus co-founder Carl Pei is in charge here, and there’s a definite parallel between the launch strategy that put OnePlus on the map and the trickle-down reveal that preceded the Nothing Phone (1). But while OnePlus’ emergence essentially kickstarted the mid-range, Nothing enters a market already full of excellent £400 phones. Thus it does something different. The specs aren’t altogether bad, but like the striking Nothing Ear(1) true wireless buds before it and unlike just about every other generic middleground Android handset, this is a phone built with design first. Nothing and design partner Teenage Engineering have absolutely succeeded on that front: you’ll know the Phone (1) when you see it. The clever clear rear is…

Horizon
EU raises safety requirements

EU raises safety requirements

New safety regulations introduced last month have made at least 20 technologies standard on all new cars sold in the EU and the UK – and will legislate some out of existence. The new arsenal of standard safety equipment, brought in under the anonymously titled General Safety Regulations 2 (GSR2), will also add more costs to cheaper cars, most likely increasing their prices. The changes had been in discussion at the UN and the EU for a decade before the EU finalised its proposals in 2019. They are being introduced in two main phases. The first went live on 6 July and the second will come in 2024, although some technologies are on a slightly different timetable. That means all new cars launched after 6 July 2022, regardless of price or engineering suitability, have…

FRIDAY Choices

FRIDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY This Time with Alan Partridge 9.30pm BBC1 (BBC2 in Wales) COMEDY OF THE WEEK We haven’t got far into this week’s show before Alan’s indelible sexism breaks cover. He congratulates co-presenter Jennie on her recent grilling of a politician, then veers off on an ill-advised spiel about why vocal woman are, of course, a good thing: “At the end of the day, hen-pecking works,” Alan (Steve Coogan) explains. “That’s why hens do it.” It’s one of many golden moments of awfulness, as another edition of This Time stumbles onto the airwaves, taking in Alan’s bizarre on-air present to Jennie (Susannah Fielding) and more tense exchanges with reporter Ruth Duggan (Lolly Adefope) and graphics wrangler Simon (Tim Key). I’m sworn to silence on the identity of the final studio guest, but it’s…

Has your phone been HACKED?

Most problems with our smartphones, such as the screen going blank or an app failing to open, are nothing to worry about and can be fixed with a quick recharge or restart. But sometimes there are more sinister reasons for our devices misbehaving, especially because hackers are finding ever more devious ways to spread mobile malware. Particularly worrying are infections that run in the background, which can steal your money, data and identity before you even realise your phone has been compromised. Here, we reveal six giveaway signs that your Android phone or iPhone has been hacked, and explain the best ways to regain control. Excessive data usage Even if your monthly phone plan includes unlimited internet access, an unusual spike in data usage can be a cause for concern. Malware could…

Has your phone been HACKED?

ADVENTURE TECH

WATER From streams to the sea, take the plunge with this aquatic gear WILD SWIMMING DRYROBE ADVANCE LONG SLEEVE Stay warm and have enough room to change beachside in privacy: that’s the big sell of the DryRobe, and it works. It’s generously sized, packed with pockets, waterproof and windproof on the outside, and has a synthetic lambswool inner that won’t need drying if you’re using it multiple times over the course of the day. Who needs changing rooms? £160, dryrobe.com SURFING NIXON HIGH TIDE SURF WATCH The High Tide puts surfing first, with the next tide displayed prominently alongside the time; dial it in to your favourite beach and you’ll never miss a session. You don’t even need to take it off (apart, perhaps, for when you’re forcing yourself into your wetsuit) – it’s rugged, fully waterproof, and…

ADVENTURE TECH
SUNDAY Choices

SUNDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Time 9.00pm BBC1 DRAMA OF THE WEEK The first episode of a drama lays out the ground, but often it’s the second that really gets to work on the meat of things. Writer Jimmy McGovern certainly gets into his stride here. With a top-notch cast he delivers scene after scene full of quiet, crushing pain — then the occasional burst of horror for good measure. There are nicely sketched subplots showing how minor characters ended up inside — casualties of violence or poverty or pride. But our main focus is prison officer Eric, now caught in an impossible bind: if he refuses to help the wing’s drug dealers, his son (who is doing time at another prison) could be killed. Stephen Graham gives a numb, dead-eyed performance of a man…

THURSDAY Choices

THURSDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Saved by a Stranger 9.00pm BBC2 DOCUMENTARY New series Anita Rani presents a series that owes a clear debt to Long Lost Family and the Thank You slot on Radio 4’s Saturday Live. Here, too, we see moving human stories culminating in tearful reunions that radiate emotion in ways you would need a heatshield to withstand. The difference is, the contributors here are hoping to find not relatives, but strangers who played a role at a defining moment in their lives. Karl was in the London tube carriage where a terrorist bomb exploded on 7 July 2005. In the darkness and confusion, a woman reassured him and they held hands. To his shame, he later edged ahead of her on the way to safety. He would love to meet her…

FRIDAY Choices

FRIDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY MasterChef 8.30pm BBC1 FOOD Although my taste in food is not the same as Gregg Wallace’s (I’m not really a pudding person), I do agree with him about the standard of cooking on MasterChef this year. It’s been higher than ever. One or two of the home cooks have been serving restaurant-quality food from the very start — and by that, I mean dishes you’d be happy to pay a lot of money for. That’s not to say there haven’t been any disasters. This year’s “chocolate fondant” — as John Torode and Gregg describe the show’s famous culinary landmines — was rack of lamb. They were served undercooked meat with lumps of unrendered fat so many times, they started to cringe whenever anyone said they were doing lamb. However, it’s unlikely…

SUNDAY Choices

SUNDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Line of Duty 9.00pm BBC1 DRAMA OF THE WEEK Last Sunday left us dangling from the cruellest of cliffhangers. We never saw what happened at the vacant lot where Jo lured Kate for a fateful stand-off with Ryan Pilkington. The screen cut to black and shots were fired. But… but… who died and who survived? My lips are sealed. Tonight’s entire plot is under embargo — and we’ve all seen what happens to rats. But as Ted, Steve and Chloe arrive at the scene, it’s acid ice-queen DCS Patricia Carmichael who takes charge. Deliciously played by Anna Maxwell Martin, Carmichael is quite the piece of work. With her weary tone and glazed smile, she treats Ted like an old has-been even as his time in the job ticks down. “It’s…

Problems Solved

Email us your problem and we’ll try to help: noproblem@computeractive.co.uk PROBLEM OF THE FORTNIGHT How is a PIN safer than a password? Q My new Windows 11 laptop asks me to sign in with a PIN, while my old desktop PC, running Windows 10, requires a password. Microsoft suggests a PIN is more secure, but I simply do not understand this. The PIN on my Windows 11 machine is just four numbers, but the older computer has a password of a dozen letters. How can a four-digit PIN be safer than my longer password? Derek Gillum A This is a great question. In fact, the idea is so counter-intuitive that even Microsoft struggles to explain the logic on its blog post on the matter (at www.snipca.com/42499). So, in simple terms, in the context of Windows 10…

Problems Solved
BABY, NURA RICH MAN

BABY, NURA RICH MAN

The pioneers of personalised sound have upgraded their true wireless in-ears with a world first… • Sexy CD Nura makes headphones that are tuned for each listener – but no matter who’s wearing them, the new NuraTrue Pro earbuds could be the best-sounding pair yet. These are the first wireless buds anywhere on the planet to support aptX Lossless over Bluetooth, which means CD-quality 16-bit audio without any wires. The bad news? You’ll need a phone that has one of Qualcomm’s latest 8+ Gen 1 processors and is certified for aptX Lossless through Snapdragon Sound, such as the Asus ROG Phone 6 or… well, not much else. More will be here later this year, but for now you’re probably stuck with slightly lower-res audio. • Hey skewed Even without that selling point, these buds…

GADGET GURU

GADGET GURU

BRIAN GREENE, MILTON KEYNES Q Guru, my pizza is awful! A Perhaps the problem isn’t so much your pizza but your oven? You could try switching out your dough recipe for the excellent River Cottage one that you can find online, but it’s more likely it’s that pathetic excuse for a hot box that’s doing you dirty. You need a hot thing that goes really hot, and if yours can only reach a nominal 200 or 220 degrees (which is likely to be a bit less than that in practice) you’re not going to get the best out of your pizza, fancy stone or not. Permanent outdoor ovens are impractical, expensive and they’ll annoy your neighbours no end, which makes them an exceptional option in Guru’s eyes. If you don’t share his selfish…

MONDAY Choices

MONDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Innocent 9.00pm ITV DRAMA OF THE WEEK If you’re one of the many viewers mourning Unforgotten, this might help. It, too, comes from the mighty pen of Chris Lang (who co-created this with Matt Arlidge) and uses the same basic idea of multiple characters connected to one appalling murder — though we can’t be sure how — as well as Lang’s brilliance at sketching lives that hold secrets. You may remember the first series, from 2018, which starred Lee Ingleby. Here another protagonist is released from prison when their conviction for murder is overturned. Sally (Katherine Kelly) was a Keswick school teacher accused of killing a student with whom she was said to be having an affair. Now, after five years, new evidence exonerates her and she walks free. Of course,…

SATURDAY Choices

SATURDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Ant and Dec’s Limitless Win 8.30pm ITV GAME SHOW New series It may seem as though Ant and Dec have the Midas touch, but there are some dud quizzes in their back catalogue. Remember PokerFace? Push the Button? Red or Black? None of them lasted long, so it’s no biggie if you don’t. But what of this latest vehicle, which sees contestants climbing an ever-increasing, never-ending ladder of cash? Well, imagine Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? with a huge Blue Peter totaliser and you have some idea as to the gist. Yet what seems initially like a simple system is soon complicated by a torrent of clauses and caveats. There are dials to turn, buttons to press, as well as lifelines to be won and lost. And at times,…

FRIDAY Choices

FRIDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY First Night of the Proms 7.15pm BBC2 MUSIC Verdi’s Requiem feels like the perfect choice to launch the 2022 season. After two years of scaled-back concerts with reduced ensembles on stage, the Royal Albert Hall can now entertain something colossal, a work encompassing death and rebirth, even the wrath of God — belted out by the massed forces of the BBC Symphony Chorus and Crouch End Festival Chorus. No stranger to the First Night (he’s been in charge four times in the past decade), Sakari Oramo conducts the BBC Symphony Orchestra. Also front of stage will be the four soloists: mezzo Jennifer Johnston, tenor Freddie De Tommaso, bass-baritone Kihwan Sim and soprano Masabane Cecilia Rangwanasha, who bagged the Song Prize in last year’s BBC Cardiff Singer of the World. Clive Myrie…

BEACH TECH YOU CAN’T BEAT

BEACH TECH YOU CAN’T BEAT

Roads must fall

ON DECEMBER 5TH a small group of people carefully removed a sign marking Cassland Road Gardens in London and laid it on the ground. Thus was one corner of the capital purged of its association with an offensive historical figure—John Cass, an early-18th-century slave trader. It was a modest event, noticed by few, which suited the organisers. “It makes more sense to do it this way,” says Toyin Agbetu, a researcher and activist. The other way is more spectacular. Last June a Bristol crowd inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement pulled down a statue of Edward Colston, another slave trader, and rolled it into the harbour. In the same week activists in Glasgow erected alternative street signs, replacing tobacco barons with black heroes. Elsewhere, statues were daubed with paint. Vigilante…

Roads must fall
FRIDAY Choices

FRIDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY My Name Is Leon 9.00pm BBC2 DRAMA “You’re a special kid,” an adult tells ten-year-old Leon at one stage in this touching drama adapted from Kit de Waal’s 2016 novel. He certainly is, and newcomer Cole Martin plays him with incredible poise as a child wise beyond his years caught in a strange and upsetting adult world. We join Leon as his baby brother Jake arrives and their mum struggles to cope. The boys have different fathers, both absent, and as Leon tries to take care of the baby, his mother goes on a downward spiral and social services must step in. We’re in Birmingham in the early 1980s when, we gather, child protection could be a dicey business and, while kindly foster-parent Maureen (Monica Dolan) does her best, Leon…

FRIDAY Choices

FRIDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY This Time with Alan Partridge 9.30pm BBC1 COMEDY Alan has one of his on-air bust-ups: Guardian journalist Dan Milner (played by a big guest star) has dared to criticise This Time for being shallow — the very thought. Alan’s riposte is almost too good, ranting that The Guardian is full of “posh men pretending to be ordinary because they’ve got teenage sons and a messy hallway”. But as usual, it’s his casual asides that deliver the most laughs, his mad digressions about hand-dryers on trains, Hamilton or Spaghetti Junction. You have to love the way he’s always on the brink of self-destructing, a brink he might cross during a segment testing champagne cocktails. Alan sober is a handful; Alan tipsy is a fiasco. The show opens with a set piece, Alan’s…

WEDNESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY The Great British Sewing Bee 9.00pm BBC1 CRAFT I bet the remaining contestants won’t want to watch Peaky Blinders again after tonight’s first challenge. This week’s theme is gentlemen’s classics and they are tasked with making a baker boy cap — although there’s no suggestion of sewing a razor blade into the peak. They’ve also got to make a utility jacket, which Joe Lycett assumes must be like a utility room and have a tumble dryer in it. Esme Grant patiently explains that it’s a practical jacket for outdoor types made in tough material and featuring at least three pockets “to keep your sandwiches, compass… and grenades in”. It would be handy if there was one for tissues, too, as there’s one disastrous outfit that makes its creator very weepy. Perhaps…

WEDNESDAY Choices
SUNDAY Choices

SUNDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Close to Me 9.00pm C4 DRAMA New series When we first see Jo Harding (Connie Nielsen) she’s unconscious at the bottom of the stairs, bleeding heavily from head wounds. She survives, but has amnesia. But it’s not simply that she can’t recall a password or find her mobile (let’s be honest, that’s normal for many of us). She can’t remember why she fell or anything about the past year — dyeing her hair, arguing with her best friend or the name of her good-looking young gardener. More disturbingly, she’s forgotten some quite major family events. Jo’s apparently solicitous husband Rob (Christopher Eccleston) takes her back home — and of course it’s one of those stunning, isolated, modern places psychological thrillers love (remember the ones in ITV’s Finding Alice and BBC1’s The…

The AGENDA

THE CATWALK GUIDE Elevated functionality was the theme of fashion month, with hard-working, easy-to-wear pieces created with longevity in mind. Here’s what to expect from the big hitters for AW22 STELLA MCCARTNEY Stella McCartney joined forces with American artist Frank Stella, delving deep into the artist’s catalogue of minimalist and maximalist abstraction. Graphic lines traversed across velvet suits and zig-zagged around the body in enveloping knit pieces, designed to be worn by “Stella women who are both creators and collectors”, turning pragmatic staples into effortlessly wearable art. AHLUWALIA Designer-to-know Priya Ahluwalia’s first ever runway show paid tribute to her cultural tapestry, placing Nollywood and Bollywood films on a shiny pedestal for all to enjoy. LOEWE Loewe shows are increasingly becoming blockbuster entertainment for fashion spectators. At times, even hysterically funny, and AW22 was no exception. Clothes included…

The AGENDA
WEDNESDAY Choices

WEDNESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Extraordinary Twins 9.00pm ITV DOCUMENTARY Programmes about conjoined twins can appear difficult to watch, initially, but this two-parter (concluding tomorrow) is very much worth it, a life-enhancing look at how people — twins, parents, surgeons — adapt to the most extreme challenges. The main focus is a family in Idaho: Nick and Chelsea face an impossible decision over whether to have surgery to separate their twin daughters, joined from the chest down. To help decide, they meet 20-year-old Carmen and Lupita (featured in Channel 4’s excellent Two Sisters, One Body last year), who have remained joined, but also five-year-old twins in California who were successfully separated. Which route is better? There is no right answer. Meanwhile, we follow the risky surgery involved in separating Turkish twins Yigit and Derman at Great…

Biden’s taxing problem

GOVERNMENTS RAISE most of their money by taxing wages, but President Joe Biden has his eyes fixed on the rich, big business and Wall Street. He proposes to fund his $2.7trn infrastructure plan in part by raising the corporate-tax rate from 21% to 28%. And to help pay for more spending on child care and support for parents, he wants to roughly double the top rate of federal tax on capital gains and dividends. For Americans earning more than $1m per year, he would bring levies on capital income into line with the top rate on wage income, which he wants to put up from 37% to 39.6%. That is about double the rate that is currently levied on rich investors, who are only a small fraction of the population…

Biden’s taxing problem
WEDNESDAY Choices

WEDNESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY The Bay 9.00pm ITV DRAMA The first week in a new job ordinarily involves getting a computer log-in from IT support. Maybe sussing out the office politics. Finding space in the communal fridge. Certainly not mobilising the workforce to help find your missing teenage son, who’s disappeared off the face of the earth. But this is the crisis that DS Jenn Townsend is now facing and, despite a night spent searching the streets of Morecambe, young Conor has yet to turn up. Unsurprisingly, this tense situation has resulted in her stepping back temporarily from the Saif Rahman case. Which is a shame, as the team left in the office has now hit a brick wall. “We’ve got nothing. We’re back at square one,” says a despondent DI Tony Manning, as…

WEDNESDAY Choices

WEDNESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY H2 O: the Molecule That Made Us 9.00pm BBC4 DOCUMENTARY OF THE WEEK New series Clouds churn. Rivers splash. Deserts bloom. This US series about water is full of dream-like visuals, beautifully filmed. They illustrate a well-crafted story about what the programme calls “Earth’s bloodstream” — the “pulse” of water cycles that human societies have harnessed so successfully, but also to breaking point. Engaging experts talk us through the big picture: a biologist tracks the astonishing lifecycle of a dragonfly that migrates from India to Africa. A Brazilian Earth scientist tracks “aerial rivers” that flow from forests. And a South African botanist illustrates how some plants can “resurrect”: despite drying to the point where their internal tissue is like glass, they can rehydrate and soften back to life, in the…

MONDAY Choices

MONDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Springwatch 8.00pm BBC2 NATURE You don’t have to be a naturalist or have a PhD in zoology to enjoy this BBC perennial. As the series demonstrates in its commentary-free “Mindfulness Moments”, there are huge mental-health benefits to watching scenes from nature. Such was the theme of host Chris Packham’s 2021 documentary The Walk That Made Me (which is still on iPlayer). For the next three weeks he and co-host Micheala Strachan will marshal all the wildlife action from their “hide” at Wild Ken Hill in Norfolk (boars, badgers, bees and bats are anticipated), while trying (not) to make each other laugh. Iolo Williams will be back on the Isle of Mull, where eagles both white-tailed and golden are to be found, as he explores a wild meadow that’s home to small…

TUESDAY Choices

TUESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Glow Up: Britain’s Next Make-up Star 10.45pm BBC1 (11.15pm in Northern Ireland) REALITY Ding dong and boom-shaka-laka! The three young MUA (make-up artist) finalists are all, without doubt, extraordinarily skilful make-up artists. Even if you’re someone who reckons anything other than a slick of lip gloss is unnecessary, you can’t fail to be impressed at what they have been able to achieve. Sometimes it’s jaw-dropping. The first of their challenges is to present a live online make-up masterclass to a panel of industry giants. It’s vital they do well at this because beauty vlogs are massive: guest judge Lisa Eldridge (who recently presented BBC2 series Make-up: a Glamorous History) has two million subscribers to her tutorials. There’s also the chance that one of the experts will be impressed enough to…

WEDNESDAY Choices

WEDNESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Hollington Drive 9.00pm ITV DRAMA The way the lives of the characters in Hollington Drive are painted is clearly a bit silly, but it’s also riveting in the most achingly joyless and tormented way. The misery is precisely rendered by writer Sophie Petzal, director Carolina Giammetta and whoever it was that created those antiseptic, show-home interiors. Even the police station is stark and bare, for heaven’s sake — more OCD than CID. Meanwhile, the ugliness of the story is ticking away nicely. The time bomb still to explode is the secret affair between head teacher Helen (Rachael Stirling) and Gareth (Jonas Armstrong), brooding father of the dead boy. But there’s also the small matter of Theresa (Anna Maxwell Martin) inventing/improvising a story to protect her son, which has led to the…

TUESDAY Choices

TUESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Irma Vep 9.00pm Sky Atlantic DRAMA New series French director Olivier Assayas returns to the subject of his 1996 cult hit, in which Maggie Cheung played a Hong Kong actor remaking a real silent-era French film serial, Les Vampires. Now he’s got more time and a bigger budget to try again. Alicia Vikander plays Mira, an American star who has come to France to play Les Vampires’ evil muse Irma Vep. Mira is smart and professional, but there is a vulnerability to her — especially in relation to her ex, who used to be her assistant — until she puts on Irma’s slinky velvet catsuit, at which point her personality seems to change. Assayas captures brilliantly the general chaos of TV production under a maverick director who’s undergoing a crisis of…

MONDAY Choices

MONDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY No Return 9.00pm ITV DRAMA New series For the second week running, Sheridan Smith’s face is the picture of anguish as she again plays a character plunged into a nightmare scenario. In Channel 5’s The Teacher, she was an educator thrown into a tailspin following allegations of sexual misconduct. And here Smith faces more agony as Kathy, a Mancunian mum on a family holiday in Turkey who’s left reeling when her 16-year-old son Noah is arrested on suspicion of committing a serious crime. With her on-screen life so full of trauma, we can only hope Smith fills any downtime with yoga and meditation. Because, if this first episode of four is anything to go by, there’s not going to be much let-up for her here. As soon as the Turkish police…

MONDAY Choices

MONDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Stephen 9.00pm ITV DRAMA New series Thirteen years after 18-year-old Stephen Lawrence was murdered in a racially motivated attack at a south-east London bus stop, his parents were still waiting for justice to be done despite three investigations, six investigating officers and a public inquiry. As his mother Doreen subsequently said about the police’s incompetence and institutionalised racism: “To them it was just another black boy who’d been stabbed.” This sequel to the 1999 Bafta-winning drama The Murder of Stephen Lawrence traces the efforts of DCI Clive Driscoll (a very believable Steve Coogan as a policeman with integrity) to solve a case that “nobody wants to touch with a barge pole” by using what he calls common-sense coppering. No matter how often you’ve heard the details of the case, it’s…

KIA EV6 GT

KIA EV6 GT

“Silly or not, a drift mode allows it to oversteer keenly and predictably” While we review new EVs as individual cars, some are also transforming the companies that create them. The Kia EV6 is already a fine example of this trend, with its combination of technology, design and pricing leapfrogging many rivals that would until recently have been regarded as sitting higher in the brand prestige hierarchy. Here’s some bad news for those rivals: the new EV6 GT moves the game on considerably further. The range-topper’s performance has been boosted by an extent that takes it out of the mainstream and into very distinguished company. Its 77.4kWh battery (the same as in the standard EV6) is relatively small compared with posher EVs’ and its 263-mile range is unexceptional. But 800V electrical architecture gives…

TUESDAY Choices

TUESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY The Syndicate 9.00pm BBC1 DRAMA Newsagent Frank (Neil Morrissey) has scarpered overseas with his customers’ lottery cash. The lousy swine is currently in a Monaco casino, acting like James Bond. If James Bond sold papers for a living and owned a big Irish wolfhound, that is. He ought to be watching his back, because Keeley (Katherine Rose Morley) isn’t admitting defeat. Despite having no luck with the police, who don’t believe her, or the lottery company, who are essentially incompetent, she’s rallying the rest of the syndicate to take action. And, as we saw in last week’s flash-forward, they’re set to make it to Monte Carlo. They’ll need to find Frank quickly or there won’t be enough money left to buy a packet of bonbons. It looks as though, from here…

SATURDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Keeping Faith 9.00pm BBC1 DRAMA Faith’s life has followed a rocky road for some time now but, as we near the end of this series, it’s as if a devastating earthquake has hit. Her husband Evan (Bradley Freegard) has been arrested for Gail’s murder, although he insists that he did nothing; lover Steve (Mark Lewis Jones) is still missing, despite that faint “Help me” phone message; and Rose (Celia Imrie)… well, she’s being as crazy, devious and vindictive as ever. Matters come to a frightening head at that fabulous clifftop house that Rose has rented. “We all have to deal with living without people we love,” she tells a quavering Faith (Eve Myles) ominously. But to whom is she referring? It’s a very dramatic ending, but there are a few happy…

SATURDAY Choices
MY WEEK IN CARS

MY WEEK IN CARS

MONDAY New cars are the bread of life for us, but some create such a frenzy that we fight every day to be first with the latest. One prime target lately has been Prodrive’s P25, the £500,000-plus, 25-off, all-sold iteration of the famous 1990s Subaru Impreza 22B homologation special, based on rare genuine bits but optimised with new materials and technology so that it’s lighter (1100kg) and more powerful (400bhp) than before. After some polite hounding from me, Prodrive boss David Richards sent a note to say that while official drives aren’t yet on the agenda, I was welcome to drop into the company’s Banbury headquarters to hear the latest. The prototype is being enthusiastically beaten up on various UK test tracks by David Lapworth, Prodrive’s resident 22B guru. Richards has also been…

SATURDAY Choices

SATURDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY The Grand National From 2.00pm ITV SPORT Britain’s favourite horse race returns, after an enforced fallow year in 2020. Runners and riders for the Grand National (5.15pm) weren’t confirmed as RT went to press, but it seems there will be a strong favourite in the form of Cloth Cap, trained by Jonjo O’Neill. It scored a good win at Kelso in March, a race that came too late to affect the handicaps here, so it has a weight advantage. The prospect of carrying too many pounds is what’s made the trainers of Tiger Roll — which would otherwise have been going for a third straight National — swerve the contest this time. Armchair punters looking to back a familiar name each way will likely have their cash on 2019…

SUNDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY The Pursuit of Love 9.00pm BBC1 DRAMA Emily Mortimer takes her adaptation of Nancy Mitford’s novel at such a gallop, it sometimes feels the plot is there merely to provide a convenient excuse for a great pop tune, such as Roxy Music’s The “In” Crowd. This, inevitably, bursts on to the soundtrack as a convenient shortcut to illustrate the full-on hedonism of tiresome, unhappy Linda (Lily James) as she emerges from a desperately unwise marriage to a titanic bore, Tony Kroesig (Freddie Fox). It’s all so breezy but when things slow down, the sadness that bubbles beneath the novel surfaces. Linda is a product of her suffocating environment — her dreadful, blustering dad (Dominic West) who doesn’t believe in educating girls — and the expectation that she should just settle down, keep…

SUNDAY Choices

The UK at a glance

Edinburgh A border with England: Were an independent Scotland to rejoin the EU, there would have to be a physical trade border with England, Nicola Sturgeon conceded this week. However, the First Minister said that she’d try to negotiate agreements that would “keep trade flowing easily”, so that businesses did not “suffer”. Last week, an SNP candidate, Emma Harper, had claimed that a physical border could “create jobs”. Appearing on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show, Sturgeon distanced herself from that remark, saying that “nobody in the SNP” is in favour of one. She agreed, however, that owing to EU rules requiring checks on goods, a border was unavoidable. It was, she said, one of the issues raised for Scotland by the “absurdity of Brexit and the Tory Brexit obsession”. Scottish Tory…

The UK at a glance

HOT TV THIS WEEK

LAST IN SERIES! Line of Duty SUNDAY 2 May, 9pm BBC1 Drama Get ready for some seriously frayed nerves and some jaw-dropping curveballs as the crime thriller reaches a dramatic climax! After the shocking revelations of last week, the pressure is on now for Hastings, Kate and Steve to bring the final pieces of the jigsaw together to try to work out who ordered the killing of journalist Gail Vella. But as tension mounts and the stakes get higher, will the elusive ‘Fourth Man’, AKA ‘H’, ever be revealed? FULL STORY P9 Casualty SATURDAY 1 May, 8.20pm BBC1 Drama The ED team are tested this week when teenager Keira is brought in, quickly followed by her nasty, racist mother. Jacob instructs everyone to remain calm and professional, but Jade – secretly shaken by a horrific attack on…

HOT TV THIS WEEK
Best Free Software

Best Free Software

EBOOK MANAGER Calibre 6.1 www.snipca.com/42716 What you need: Windows 10 or 11, macOS or Linux This brilliant open-source program is the best way to read and manage ebooks on your computer without being tied to a single service such as Amazon’s Kindle Store. It lets you convert ebooks easily from one format to another, edit their contents, download articles from the web, back up and share your library, and much more. Calibre 6 is the first big update for a year-and-a-half (the 6.1 refers to a few bug fixes implemented shortly after its release) and somehow finds space for even more features without making the interface overcrowded. The most significant is a full-text search tool, which indexes all the ebooks in your collection, so you can quickly find mentions of specific names, words and phrases.…

SUNDAY Choices

SUNDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY The Lakes with Simon Reeve 9.00pm BBC2 DOCUMENTARY OF THE WEEK New series In so many TV documentaries about our countryside, the presenter has a jolly chat with someone and then “has a go” at an artisanal craft or skill. Not Simon Reeve. He clearly has too much respect for what people are doing. So, when he joins Cumbrian youngsters learning how to build a dry-stone wall, an upland sheep farmer releasing two fell ponies into the wild, or a woman running a domestic violence charity in Barrow-in-Furness, he observes, he asks questions and he listens, instead of turning it into an entertaining sequence about himself. Reeve always takes his subject seriously, digging beneath the surface, no matter how grubby it gets. So don’t expect much admiring of views and…

Synology RT6600ax

Synology RT6600ax

Synology is best known for its NAS drives – external storage devices that connect to a router rather than your PC, so that the hard drives inside them can be accessed by any device on your network. However, it also makes its own routers. The Synology RT6600ax is the latest model and brings Wi-Fi 6 to the range. The router costs £280 and is available to pre-order from Scan. At the time of writing it wasn’t widely available elsewhere, but it should be appearing in other online stores by the time you read this, so we encourage you to shop around for the best deal. “A plain slab of a router that provides solid speeds and easy-to-use controls” The router isn’t much to look at – a black plastic slab with six antennas…

FERRARI 296 GTB ASSETTO FIORANO

FERRARI 296 GTB ASSETTO FIORANO

Can certain supercar makers get away with offering an engine that isn’t an event in its own right? Undoubtedly, but Ferrari isn’t one of them. You might therefore have reservations about the 296 GTB, driven here for the first time in the UK. This is a car whose hybridisation and 250 LM-inspired design are big talking points but not the really big talking point, which is the engine: never before has a mere V6 found a home inside a Ferrari road car. In cold terms, it represents something of a downgrade from the V8 configuration the company has used for its mid-engined mainstays since 1973. More to the point, when was the last time anyone gave us an outstanding V6, Alfa Romeo’s Busso aside? There are other non-trivial concerns. Compared with the…

Readers’ Tips

Email us your tips: letters@computeractive.co.uk TIP OF THE FORTNIGHT Find and remove files with long names I’ve been using SearchMyFiles ever since you suggested it way back in Issue 565 (page 20) as a way of finding files in a disorganised hard drive. It’s one of those ingenious tools from NirSoft (www.nirsoft.net) that you often recommend, and certainly better than any Windows search tool I’ve used. A recent update to the tool (version 3.20) lets you search for files with a name longer than a specified number of characters, which is a handy way of finding and eradicating certain files. To download SearchMyFiles, visit www.snipca.com/42580 then click one of the links at the bottom. You’ll need to extract it from a ZIP file when it downloads. Open the program, then click the ‘No filename length filter’…

Readers’ Tips
‘I want to stress less, enjoy life & BE HAPPY’

‘I want to stress less, enjoy life & BE HAPPY’

It’s a very hot day on the GH cover shoot and Monica Galetti is sitting beside me when her phone suddenly pings. She reads a text message, frowns – and then laughs. ‘The extraction fan in the kitchen of my restaurant just blew,’ she says. ‘You have to laugh. Otherwise, you might cry!’ It’s been a testing few months for the Samoan-born chef. Monica, 46, has been busy dealing with the effects of the pandemic on her restaurant, Mere, which she runs with her sommelier husband, David. She’s also been dealing with a family crisis: in February, her 15-year-old nephew, Otis, who lives in New Zealand, was diagnosed with a desmoplastic small round cell tumour, a rare form of cancer. It was a huge blow and in May Monica took the difficult…

TUESDAY Choices

TUESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Who Do You Think You Are? 9.00pm BBC1 (10.35pm Wales) GENEALOGY There are some outings in this series that you’re best not knowing too much about in advance. Part of the pleasure is experiencing the ancestral bolts-from-the-blue as they happen, particularly for this series opener, where comedian Josh Widdicombe gets bolt after bolt — and is enjoyably dumbfounded. “I’m not who I thought I was,” he muses at one stage, his mental furniture shifting to accommodate a fresh set of revelations. At another point he wonders aloud “if this is all a big prank” — very understandable. Widdicombe grew up in a remote Devon village and after chatting to his parents, he starts by investigating a rumour that one of their forebears came from the Barings banking family. It seems a…

Inflation sparks falling demand

Inflation sparks falling demand

The car industry has so far ridden out the shocks of Covid and subsequent supply chain disruption surprisingly successfully, at least as far as profits show. But the greatest shock might yet be around the corner and prove far harder to overcome: a collapse in demand. The consumer’s desire for new cars has so far outstripped the limited supply, allowing car makers to pare back marketing costs, including discounts, and focus on the pricier cars making the most profits. Car makers have even been able to pass on the cost of rising raw materials without worrying too much about orders. However, a new survey from Autocar sibling What Car? that canvassed the opinion of those in the market for a new car showed that 37% had decided to delay their purchase as they…

MONDAY Choices

MONDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Sherwood 9.00pm BBC1 DRAMA New series There may be times watching this masterly drama from writer James Graham when you find yourself needing one of those police display boards with photos on and lines showing the connections between people. It’s complicated. There’s a rich web of characters, each of them fully formed and played by someone who, in other circumstances, might be top of a cast list. Put simply, we’re in a Nottinghamshire mining town, where the community still bears scars of divisions from the miners’ strike of the 1980s. Grudges are held. History matters. “We never forget round ’ere,” says one local. And at a wedding reception Gary (Alun Armstrong) notes that “If looks could kill, we’d have a dozen knives in us back.” Graham is best known for…

Phone and Tablet Tips

ANDROID & iOS React to WhatsApp messages using any emoji In Issue 631 (page 44), we covered WhatsApp’s new emoji-reactions feature, which lets you respond to people’s messages using an emoji without sending a separate reply. Initially, there were six options to choose from – thumbs-up, heart, laughing face, shocked, crying and folded hands – but the feature has now been expanded to let you react using any emoji. Press a message in a WhatsApp conversation to open the emoji-reactions panel, then tap the plus sign at the end of the row (see screenshot below). You can now browse the hundreds of emojis included in the app’s keyboard and select the relevant one for your response. Change your reaction by pressing the message again and selecting a different emoji – you can only…

Phone and Tablet Tips
TUESDAY Choices

TUESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Toast of Tinseltown 10.00pm BBC2 SITCOM New series It had to happen. Jobbing actor Steven Toast, worn down by pedant-controlled voiceovers and run-ins with virtually everyone, is finally offered the chance of a lifetime: an audition to appear in a Hollywood film. Matt Berry’s ego-driven antihero has moved from Channel 4, too, after three successful series of Toast of London. But first we find Toast in familiar territory: back in the recording booth, irked by both producer Clem Fandango and a fussy novelist (an awesome cameo that’s a feather in the show’s cap). His agent Jane Plough (Doon Mackichan) has good news, but Toast is so surly and oppositional now that he’s forced to visit an anger management guru called Des Wigwam (Kayvan Novak, who does fine work wherever he…

FRIDAY Choices

FRIDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY This Time with Alan Partridge 9.30pm BBC1 COMEDY OF THE WEEK Steve Coogan has said that he fully expects to keep playing Alan Partridge “in one form or another, till I die”. The great man’s current gig — 30 years on from his beginnings as a spoof sports reporter on Radio 4 — returns for a second series as he again grapples with the demands of not fluffing his lines, insulting the guests or letting his bitterness show on live television, alongside beaming co-host Jennie Gresham (Susannah Fielding). Coogan has teased that in this series we can expect more of the presenters’ private lives running in parallel with the on-screen shambles. No previews were available, but the first series set the bar high, written (by Rob and Neil Gibbons) to…

TUESDAY Choices

TUESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Hemingway 9.00pm BBC4 DOCUMENTARY OF THE WEEK New series The opening shot pans slowly over a handwritten page of one of Ernest Hemingway’s manuscripts, animating the crossings-out and revisions. It’s a vivid way to bring his writing process to life, and because this is a Ken Burns series, there are other neat touches, as well as his subtly edited use of monochrome stills in a way that makes us almost feel we have seen film footage when we haven’t. You don’t need to be a great Hemingway fan to become absorbed in his life story, and it is beautifully told here, digging beneath the myths. When he lived in Paris in the 1920s, for instance, Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley Richardson, were not in fact penniless, as he later…

SUNDAY Choices

SUNDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Grace 8.00pm ITV DRAMA Arthur Darvill is this week’s guest star and he’s playing the kind of wealthy socialite that Columbo would have relished bringing to book in the 1970s. You’ll recognise the type: smug, arrogant and crying out to have his pomposity pricked. But Kit Bishop does differ from those lubricious antagonists in one key respect, as we can’t be certain that he’s murdered his wife Katya. He definitely has motive, with a life insurance policy recently taken out in her name making him look particularly guilty. But as the police team gathers evidence, it quickly becomes apparent that if Bishop did the deed, he’d have needed to be in two places at the same time. Before the two-hour running time is up, expect twists aplenty (some convincing, others ludicrous),…

How to build a makeup bag (without spending a fortune)

If you priced up the contents of your makeup bag, what would the total be? A straw poll in the GH office revealed the average cost of replacing the items we use in our daily routines was £230 (quite a few of the team’s bags had contents worth £300 plus). We’re not about to try to sell you insurance or advise you to up your cover, but it got us thinking: what does a modern makeup bag look like and, mindful of the spiralling cost of living, where are savings to be made? We asked three leading beauty experts, challenging them to curate a brilliant makeup bag for less. One came in at just under £63, while another cut costs on some products in order to spend a little more on others.…

How to build a makeup bag (without spending a fortune)

SUNDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY The Newsreader 9.00pm, 9.55pm BBC2 DRAMA New series It must take great skill to make the pussy-bow blouse you’re wearing quiver in disgust, but actress Anna Torv somehow manages it while playing Helen Norville, an Australian news anchor fighting to have her talent recognised at a 1980s commercial TV station. Helen initially appears to be all hairspray and indignation, and in a lesser drama would be painted as a one-note Dynasty-style “superbitch”. But The Newsreader is a classier product, and we soon realise that the power dress is merely the armour Helen must wear to battle both her dyspeptic male boss and her entitled veteran co-host. Much more of an ally is reporter Dale Jennings (Sam Reid) who, thanks to a personal crisis, gets to know the real Helen behind the…

SUNDAY Choices

SATURDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Killing Eve 9.15pm BBC1 DRAMA There has been such an outcry on social media about this final episode that you may already have a rough idea about what happens to Villanelle (Jodie Comer) and Eve (Sandra Oh). But no spoilers here. It has taken a while, but the pair have now accepted — and embraced — their bond. Their scenes together, playing silly games with sweets or teasing each other about being a psychopath, are a delight. That’s not to say there isn’t violence. Eve has toughened up a lot since we first met her and one of the final scenes is very bloody, even though it’s depicted in a stylised way to a disco backbeat. If you’re disappointed by the finale (although it has humour, emotion, death, an unexpected twist…

SATURDAY Choices
FRIDAY Choices

FRIDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Have I Got News for You 9.00pm BBC1 ENTERTAINMENT Panel shows are of-the-moment. They come and go. Yes, a lucky few of them come, go and come back again years later, like Never Mind the Buzzcocks, recently revived by Sky, or (at the less rock’ n’ roll end of things) Blankety Blank, which returned on Saturday to BBC1. But only one series emerged from the early-1990s panel-show boom and has simply kept going ever since, fronted by the same team captains now as it was for series one in 1990. Tonight marks the start of series 62 of Have I Got News for You and at its best the comedy still feels sharp, the satire still has teeth – or perhaps dentures at this point. As RT goes to press there…

‘Sharing our stories means we feel less alone, more in control’

There’s something I’ve heard talk of for years; like a dark fairy tale for women, spoken of in hushed tones by groups of nervous looking, sweating ladies desperate to find out what’s happening to them. When I was younger, the menopause wasn’t so much a natural part of life, more a horror story. And like the best horrors, information was sparse and, with each telling, the details got worse. Of course, ignorance is the cause of most fear. I knew more about the Loch Ness Monster than I did about my reproductive system and it felt like the menopause was hiding round the corner waiting for me, like a hormonal Freddy Krueger. I remember hearing women whisper about ‘the change of life’ as if it was a transformational moment when you…

‘Sharing our stories means we feel less alone, more in control’
WEDNESDAY Choices

WEDNESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY The Great British Sewing Bee 9.00pm BBC1 CRAFT Someone’s got to win. It is a competition, after all. But the last three amateur sewists — who are all incredibly young — are equally talented and charming, so it’s impossible to choose between them. Even the little films about their family life and how they got into sewing didn’t make it any easier for me to pick a favourite. The theme is celebration and the bridesmaid dresses they make for their first challenge are so lovely that Esme Young announces she’d have them at her wedding… to Boy George. Patrick Grant, meanwhile, is so enamoured with one fabulous festival outfit in the transformation round that he can’t resist modelling it. Thankfully, though, he doesn’t try on the off-the-shoulder gown in the…

FALL IN STYLE

FALL IN STYLE

TED BAKER REVERSIBLE BELT Black? Brown? Can’t choose? This 100% bovine leather belt is the solution with black on one side and dark brown on the reverse. Both sides are high-shine while the brushed dark silver buckle features a Ted Baker logo. £40, mainlinemenswear.co.uk PAUL SMITH OLIVE JACKET While this shirt jacket is a bit of an investment its classic cut works with both a casual and a tailored look so it will earn its keep over the years. Dark green suede is embellished with logo-engraved snap fastenings. £1,500, paulsmith.com CAMPERLAB DERBY SHOES Smart doesn’t mean a compromise on style. These black 1978 Derby shoes balance a classic aesthetic with contemporary charm featuring a squared-toe and block heel. The rubber sole is topped with leather upper and Derby lacing system. £255, matchesfashion.com TOM FORD SILK TIE Ease the pain of…

SUNDAY Choices

SUNDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY The Girl Before 9.00pm BBC1 DRAMA New series If we can take away one message from 2021’s TV dramas, it’s don’t trust a hi-tech house. Finding Alice, Close to Me, Angela Black — all had modern homes where you’re only ever a stumble on the stairs away from disaster. Entire dramas could have been avoided with banisters. Here, we’re at a minimalist pad in north London, rented out by weirdo architect Edward (David Oyelowo). The story unfolds in separate timelines as two women — Jane (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) and Emma (Jessica Plummer) — decide to move in, despite the strict rules Edward imposes (no books, no pictures, no children). Both women have trauma in their recent past, and Jane gets wind of the fact that Emma’s spell in the house did…

SUNDAY Choices

SUNDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Chloe 9.00pm BBC1 DRAMA New series Becky (Erin Doherty, most recently seen as Princess Anne in The Crown) has a boring, low-paid job as a temp and lives with her mother, who has early-onset dementia. Lonely and insecure, she yearns for the picture-perfect Instagram life of her former school friend Chloe (Poppy Gilbert), who she follows obsessively on social media. When Chloe suddenly and mysteriously dies, Becky reinvents herself as the confident and worldly Sasha and infiltrates Chloe’s friendship group. But why? Is it to find out what really happened to the friend she idolised, or could it be for some darker, more twisted purpose? Whatever the reason, she does it very cleverly, engineering a “chance” meeting with Chloe’s friend Livia (Pippa Bennett-Warner) and gradually gaining her confidence. Alice Seabright has written…

FRIDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY Avoidance 10.40pm BBC1 SITCOM The “com” part of sitcom gets a bit sidelined tonight, but we’ve reached a point with this likeable show where characters are fleshed out enough for laugh-out-loud moments to feel less essential and more of a bonus. The poignant predicament of Jonathan, with his extreme versions of traits we all know — self-doubt, running away from problems and so on — is only part of the story. We’re also invested in Danielle and Courtney (Mandeep Dhillon and Lisa McGrillis), whose home has been upended by having Jonathan and son to stay. Once again, tonight’s episode levers open the faultlines in their marriage. That subplot has to play second fiddle to Jonathan’s insecurities about not having friends, with nice observations on how brutal WhatsApp groups can be, as…

FRIDAY Choices
‘We took 20 YEARS to FALL IN LOVE’

‘We took 20 YEARS to FALL IN LOVE’

We had a December wedding, primarily so there would be no expectations about weather and we could sing cheerful carols in church. On the day, we had perfect blue skies and a sprinkling of snow, making me feel like I’d landed in a fairy tale as I walked towards the village church where I was christened, in a full-length ivory wedding dress. I don’t remember feeling any nerves. The person waiting for me at the end of the aisle was so familiar that the fact we were committing to spend the rest of our future together felt totally natural. I could tell Bruce felt exactly the same as I approached him. He gave me a cheerful grin, then glanced up at my head to check out my tiara. Possibly that was…

WEDNESDAY Choices

PICK OF THE DAY The Great 10.00pm C4 COMEDY DRAMA The Great should really be called The Terrific. It’s certainly more than worthy of its recent multiple Emmy nominations, which included well-earned nods for Nicholas Hoult and Elle Fanning. Now that Peter (Hoult) has abdicated — he was isolated and hungry, poor love — Catherine (Fanning) is finally in power and about to be crowned. Peter, under house arrest in his quarters, tries to win Catherine’s heart by scratching away at the violin and hanging out with the great French Enlightenment thinker Voltaire. But Catherine hasn’t got time for her husband’s serenades: her focus is instead on enlightening Russia with literature, art and education and, much to Velementov’s disappointment, by avoiding unnecessary war. It’s something of a Sisyphean task since the court don’t know what to…

WEDNESDAY Choices