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Guardian Weekly

Guardian Weekly 16th April 2021

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The Guardian Weekly magazine is a round-up of the world news, opinion and long reads that have shaped the week. Inside, the past seven days' most memorable stories are reframed with striking photography and insightful companion pieces, all handpicked from The Guardian and The Observer.

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Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Guardian News & Media Limited
Frequency:
Weekly
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52 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
eyewitness brazil

Messiah complex Jesus rises above the southern Brazilian city of Encantado, where a crowdfunded statue is being built five metres taller than Christ the Redeemer, the famous landmark in Rio de Janeiro. The 43-metre Christ the Protector statue was the idea of local politician Adroaldo Conzatti, who died of Covid-19 in March. The Guardian Weekly Founded in Manchester, England 4 July 1919 Guardian Weekly is an edited selection of some of the best journalism found in the Guardian and Observer newspapers in the UK and the Guardian’s digital editions in the UK, US and Australia. The weekly magazine has an international focus and three editions: global, Australia and North America. The Guardian was founded in 1821, and Guardian Weekly in 1919. We exist to hold power to account in the name of the public interest,…

2 min.
riots in belfast, a prince remembered and a giant loophole

Over the past couple of weeks, there have been scenes in the streets of Belfast that almost everyone with a stake in Northern Ireland hoped had been confined to the history books. Last Thursday, crowds clashed in west Belfast and rioters were dispersed with water cannon after nights of unrest in loyalist areas. Our Ireland correspondent Rory Carroll has been making sense of this latest surge in anger – fuelled by fears old and new about the changing nature of Northern Ireland. The big story Page 10 → In 1947, the Observer approved of a “gallant mariner” and his engagement to Princess Elizabeth. After the Duke of Edinburgh’s death last Friday just shy of his 100th birthday, Tim Adams reflects on Prince Philip’s many facets: stalwart husband, family confidant, poetry lover,…

10 min.
global report

1 UNITED STATES Fury in Minneapolis over shooting of Daunte Wright Police clashed with protesters for a second night in the suburbs of Minneapolis on Monday after the death of 20-year-old Daunte Wright in a police shooting. Law enforcement officers swarmed the suburb of Brooklyn Center to disperse hundreds of people who had gathered outside the police headquarters. The clashes occurred hours after police released body-camera footage, which showed the unarmed Black man’s death. Police described the shooting last Sunday as “an accidental discharge” after the video appeared to show the officer, later identified Kim Potter, a 26-year veteran of the force, threatening to use her Taser before opening fire. Meanwhile, President Joe Biden, under pressure to act after a slew of mass shootings, has announced his first steps to curb the “epidemic” of gun…

1 min.
deaths

Prince Philip The Duke of Edinburgh and the longest-serving consort in British history. He died on 9 April aged 99. Spotlight, p15 Shirley Williams British peer and one of the original “gang of four” Labour politicians who split to form the Social Democratic party. She died on 12 April aged 90. DMX New York rapper (real name: Earl Simmons) whose gruff tone electrified the US music scene in the late 1990s. He died on 9 April aged 50. Paul Ritter British actor and star of sitcom Friday Night Dinner, as well as Chernobyl and films including Quantum of Solace. He died on 5 April aged 54. Ramsey Clark The US attorney general in the Johnson administration who fought for civil rights before later representing the likes of Slobodan Milošević and Saddam Hussein. He died on 9 April, aged 93.…

3 min.
science and environment

ARCHAEOLOGY ‘Lost golden city’ is the most vital find since Tutankhamun Archaeologists have hailed the discovery of what is believed to be the largest ancient city found in Egypt, which experts say is one of the most important finds since the unearthing of Tutankhamun’s tomb. The Egyptologist Zahi Hawass announced the discovery of the “lost golden city”, known as Aten, saying the site was uncovered near Luxor, home of the Valley of the Kings. The 3,000-year-old city dates to the reign of Amenhotep III, and continued to be used by Tutankhamun and Ay. After seven months of excavations, several neighbourhoods have been uncovered, including a bakery complete with ovens and storage pottery, as well as administrative and residential districts. CARTOGRAPHY Engraved stone could be Europe’s oldest 3D map Archaeologists in France have uncovered a stone with…

3 min.
united kingdom

CORONAVIRUS Vaccine programme on track despite Oxford issues The UK’s vaccination programme is expected to be effectively completed shortly after that of the US, and several weeks ahead of the EU’s effort, despite falling up to six weeks behind because of problems affecting the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab. Airfinity, which tracks vaccination programmes worldwide, forecasts that 75% of the population can be fully immunised in the UK by the first week in August, a level where herd immunity arguably begins to take effect – though variants and the potential need for booster jabs could impact this significantly. That would be about a week and a half behind the US, which can reach the same level by late July, but six weeks ahead of the EU, which the company estimates will achieve the same milestone towards the…