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House and GardenHouse and Garden

House and Garden January 2019

House & Garden unlocks the door to an array of unique homes and outdoor features, ranging from town houses and converted barns to fabulous modern apartments and island retreats. Outdoor features are equally varied, including cottage gardens, water gardens and chic, city courtyards. House & Garden provides an invaluable sourcebook of ideas, from design and decoration to the best of travel, delicious recipes and fine wine. Britain’s most glamorous, inspiring and influential design and decoration magazine.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast Publications Ltd
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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this month’s contributors

CLAUDIA RODEN Food writer As much a cultural anthropologist as a cookery writer, Claudia Roden has spent her career collecting recipes from all over the world that might otherwise have become lost. In 1956, during the Jewish exodus from Egypt (where Claudia was born and grew up), she began gathering family recipes that had been passed orally from generation to generation but not written down. These found their way into A Book of Middle Eastern Food, her first cookery book. Her recipes for a Mediterranean New Year’s feast (pages 131-136) were inspired by Italy and Spain, but despite all her travelling, she says her favourite place to cook is her own kitchen. No dinner party table is complete without… ‘Fresh flowers.’ CLARE FOSTER Garden editor Clare started in book publishing, before moving to Gardens Illustrated magazine,…

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from the editor

I am always slightly flummoxed when asked what my interiors style is, as for me it is the architecture and location that largely dictate the style I would choose. Although there are common denominators – pieces I’m attached to and similarities I can’t detect (just as I can’t see that my children look anything like me!). But if I had an apartment in Milan, I might opt for concrete floors and chic Italian sofas, while it would be antiques and even the odd bit of chintz if I was decorating an old rectory in the Cotswolds. In this January issue, we feature five very different interiors, all decorated with a sensitivity to the style of building and the location – be it colonial-themed airiness in South Africa (from page 78), modern…

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clear winners

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notebook

For suppliers’ details, see Stockists page…

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curtains

STEEL ‘25MM CLASSIC POLE’ (MATT BLACK), FROM 20P A CENTIMETRE; AND ‘25MM CANNONBALL FINIAL’ (MATT BLACK), £18.20; BOTH FROM JIM LAWRENCE. METAL ‘IDA CURTAIN RINGS WITH CLIP’ (BLACK), £26 FOR 12, FROM CARAVANE. PHOTOGRAPH: PATRICK QUAYLE…

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eye of the tiger

The idea of the artist-designed rug is nothing new. Twentieth-century masters such as Pablo Picasso, Alexander Calder and Ellsworth Kelly all worked with manufacturers in a medium that gave their artworks a new perspective. Today, artists remain a rich resource for rug producers. For 30 years, Christopher Farr (christopherfarr.eu) has used designs by creatives such as Anni Albers, Sarah Morris and Howard Hodgkin, and now the company is working with 11 contemporary artists for Tomorrow’s Tigers, a fundraising project with World Wide Fund for Nature and Artwise, which aims to double tiger numbers in the wild by 2022. Those involved include Anish Kapoor, Kiki Smith and Gary Hume, who have been tasked with providing their take on the traditional Tibetan tiger rug. Especially popular in the nineteenth century, these rugs were made…

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