How It Works Book of Aircraft

How It Works Book Of Aircraft 2nd Edition

The history of human aviation spans over a hundred years, from the first manned flight of the Wright Flyer in 1903 to the futuristic spacecraft of today that shuttle astronauts and payloads to the International Space Station. Today's aircraft are constantly evolving and being upgraded. In this new edition of How It Works Book of Aircraft we will bring to life a plethora of modern flying machines, from fighter jets to drones and engineless gliders to rocket ships. Featuring: Iconic aircraft - From the early days of aviation to the modern day, iconic aircraft of all shapes and sizes have taken to the skies. Fighter Jets - Come fact to face with the world's most technologically advanced aircraft, built for speed and stealth. Flying in style - Take a look inside commercial aircraft, from private jets and hot air balloons to personal drones and gliders. Exploring space - Survey the outer limits of our universe with the spacecraft that investigate alien worlds and stars.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
One-off
£6.57

in this issue

1 min
welcome to how it works book of aircraft

The history of human aviation spans over a hundred years, from the first manned flight of the Wright Flyer in 1903, which flew a groundbreaking 260 metres, to the futuristic spacecraft of today that shuttle astronauts and payloads to the International Space Station. Today’s aircraft are constantly evolving and being upgraded; would the Wright brothers even recognise a Eurofighter Typhoon as a descendant of their Flyer? In this new edition of How It Works Book of Aircraft, we will bring to life a plethora of modern flying machines. Find out what it takes to become a pilot for the Red Arrows and how the Supermarine Spitfire became such a successful aircraft in the Military section. Discover how commercial airliners are becoming more and more efficient and what the next evolution…

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1 min
wright flyer

Orville and Wilbur Wright were dedicated to their task of developing powered flight. Meticulously tested, the Wright Flyer was constructed in Dayton, Ohio but failed to take off on the first tests carried out on 14 December 1903. It eventually managed to get airborne a few days later on 17 December and achieved a best of 260 metres (852 feet) as Wilbur and Orville took turns to pilot their invention. The aircraft was launched from a short monorail track by two modified bicycle wheel hubs. The engine was very basic and worked using a hand lever that could only open and close the fuel line rather than throttle. Prior to the Flyer, the brothers created various gliders from 1900 to 1903 that were tested without great success. Eventually, they found…

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2 min
boeing 747

In the 1960s, aviation companies had a problem. With the popularity of aviation soaring for business, recreation and industry, the supply of aircraft was struggling to meet demand. But Boeing had a solution up its sleeve; the biggest civilian airplane ever built, the 747. Built in less than 16 months by a group of workers known as ‘the Incredibles’, the design came in three variations – passenger, cargo and passenger/freighter – and was first flown in 1968. By 1970, this new breed of jumbo jet had fitted seamlessly into the world’s air traffic and silenced critics. Since its inception, the 747s have appeared in a variety of models. The 747-400 was first flown in 1988 and is a combination of the earlier freight and passenger models. It is the bestselling…

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2 min
stealth bomber

Commonly known as the Stealth Bomber, the Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit is a ground-breaking piece of aviation. The design was a giant leap forward in aviation technology and was first flown on 17 July 1989 before joining the US Air Force’s operational fleet in 1993. Four 19,000 pound thrust F118-GE engines allow the B-2 to cruise at high subsonic speeds and was, at its peak, the largest military programme at Boeing with 10,000 people employed on the project. The engine is so state of the art that it uses a temperature control system to minimise the aircraft’s thermal signature. A strategic, long-range heavy bomber, it only achieved full operational capacity in 2003, ten years after its introduction into the fleet. Twenty-one B-2s are now in operation and are located at…

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2 min
concorde

In 1971 the skies of Britain were dominated by the sound of sonic booms. These were the results of a futuristic Anglo-French project known as Concorde. After 5,000 hours worth of testing (making it the most tested aircraft of all time), it was ready. Seating 100 people, Concorde represented the next step in commercial travel. It was so fast that it still holds the record for the shortest transatlantic crossing, a scintillating 2 hours 52 minutes and 59 seconds. The aircraft accomplished this by utilising ‘reheat’ technology, which injects extra fuel at takeoff. This innovative technology helped the Concorde fly around the globe in 1992, on the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ journey. It managed to complete the journey in just under 33 hours. The Concorde’s final flight was on 24…

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2 min
the enola gay

The statistics… Enola Gay Length: 30.2m (99ft) Weight: 31,400kg (69,000lb) Wingspan: 43m (141.3ft) Max speed: 588km/h (365mph) Max altitude: 9,710m (31,850ft) Years in service: One ‘Enola Gay;’ and ‘Little Boy’. Two names that are now synonymous with changing the city of Hiroshima and the whole world forever. Named after pilot Paul W. Tibbets’ mother, Enola Gay was a B-29 bomber built under the top-secret ‘Silverplate’ programme. Part of a batch of 15 bombers, it was chosen to fly the first ever atomic combat mission. The weapon would be known as ‘Little Boy’ and was a 15-kiloton bomb. Taking off at 2.45am local time, it arrived in Iwo Jima at 6.05am and armed its payload. After Little Boy was dropped 11.5 miles from the detonation point, the aircraft turned to make its hasty escape. As the atomic bomb sent…

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