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HuckHuck

Huck

Issue 70 - Summer Issue

Huck is inspired by DIY culture, featuring people who make you think, who challenge the system, who strike out on their own. Packed with intelligent journalism and stunning photography, it covers the people and the places that are shaping culture all over the world.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Church of London
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
huck

EDITORIAL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Andrea Kurland ACTING EDITOR Cian Traynor cian@tcolondon.com DIGITAL EDITOR Dominique Sisley ASSOCIATE EDITOR Niall Flynn SOCIAL EDITOR Benjamin Cook CONTRIBUTORS WORDS Adam White Amelia Tate Ciara Byrne Daniel Dylan Wray Emily Reynolds Jenny Odell Jess Holland Jez Fredenburgh Kaspar Loftin Néha Hirve IMAGES Al Higgins Chico Lurdermir Eric Gomes Gavin Wren Lillie Eiger Mason Silva Néha Hirve Sacha Lecca Simon Burstall Theo McInnes Vicky Grout Wig Worland PUBLISHING PUBLISHER Vince Medeiros MEDIA SALES Ollie Slade oliver.slade@tcolondon.com SPECIAL PROJECTS Steph Pomphrey LEGAL Alex Wade ACCOUNTS Brian Clark GENERAL MANAGER Wendy Klerck CREATIVE ART DIRECTOR – HUCK Eve Izaak eve@tcolondon.com ART DIRECTOR – LWLIES Laurene Boglio GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Simon Hayes Sophie Mo 71A GALLERY STUDIO MANAGER Isabel Fitzgerald-Allsopp isabel@tcolondon.com TCO AGENCY MANAGING DIRECTOR Simon Baker simon@tcolondon.com ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Stefanie Sword-Williams HEAD OF STRATEGY D’Arcy Doran HEAD OF INSIGHTS Helen Job HEAD OF IMPACT PARTNERSHIPS Josie Parmee EDITORIAL LEAD Michael Fordham HEAD OF FILM Rachel Goldsworthy DESIGN DIRECTOR Fabrizio Festa PRODUCTION Chloe Dyson Sarah Rimassa Terese Christensen Zach Sebastian BRANDED BOOKS Clive Wilson THE MIGHTY-MIGHTY DIRECTOR Phil Young phil@themighty-mighty.com HUCK IS PUBLISHED QUARTERLY ADVERTISE IN HUCK Ollie Slade oliver.slade@tcolondon.com +44 (0) 207-729-3675 ON THE COVER COVER A: Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker, London, June 2019. Photo: Lillie Eiger. COVER B: An eco-activist in Hambach Forest, Germany. Photo: Néha Hirve. PUBLISHED BY ©tco London 2019 71a Leonard Street London ec2a 4qs tcolondon.com GENERAL DISTRIBUTOR Intermedia Brand Marketing Ltd getintouch@inter-media.co.uk +44 (0) 1293-312-110 SPECIALIST DISTRIBUTOR mms…

access_time6 min.
doing nothing, finding everything.

There is an artist’s version of writer’s block, and I experienced it for the first time in 2016. For years, I’d been making work about infrastructure and the built environment while also teaching digital art at Stanford. But the end of that year brought me to a standstill. First, there was the US presidential election, which left me and everyone I knew reeling. Not more than a month later, in December, a catastrophic fire broke out during an event at the Ghost Ship warehouse in Oakland (where I’m based), claiming the lives of 36 people. Many of them were artists, and several of them were friends of friends. In my capacity as an artist, I felt unable to do or make anything at that moment – so I didn’t. And yet…

access_time16 min.
beast mode

Kevin Parker seems surprisingly composed for someone under enormous pressure. In a few hours, the 33-year-old will play to nearly 20,000 people at London’s O2 Arena, many of whom are desperate for him to make an announcement. It’s been four years since the release of Tame Impala’s third album, Currents: a glorious fusion of dance, psychedelic rock and electronica that became an international hit, clocking up hundreds of millions of plays online. The trajectory behind that has been an improbable rise – one that’s forced a solitary stoner to get comfortable with the demands of success. Growing up in Perth, Western Australia, Kevin would tinker with music in his bedroom as a way to keep his head together. His parents (his dad was an accountant from Zimbabwe who played music in his…

access_time10 min.
joyful resistance

On a cloudy Saturday morning sometime in spring, a group of mentally ill people gathered in a dingy Central London room to talk about a new group that we hoped to set up. The meeting had all the hallmarks of a classic organising session: an agenda to work through, tasks to be assigned, ideas to be debated, reshaped and recast. But one thing on the to-do list was less quantifiable, less allocatable: joy. It’s something often missing from activism. For all the victories clawed back from the uncaring face of the world and all the pleasure that can bring, the reality can sometimes be less than joyful. Interpersonal struggles, concerns that we’re not doing enough, burnout and stress – these all hamper a collective ability to make change. This was the…

access_time6 min.
beyond binary

At a graffiti-covered skate spot in north London, skater Rae Smith is sitting on a nearby patch of grass, eating toast. With her shaved head, long limbs and neon pink board, the 35-year-old is a familiar face around here. She’s warm, observant and quick to smile – fist-bumping everyone who drifts past holding a board. Rae skates here most afternoons, when she’s not organising all-inclusive, beginner-friendly skateboard meetups around London or recording conversations for her YouTube vlog, Keep Pushing. Like any other skater, her Instagram account frames all the fun moments: the hype of nailing a new trick, bloody elbows from slamming into concrete, post-skate pizzas. But you’ll also see her talking about deeper, more personal issues, like the highs and lows that have come with openly claiming her identity as…

access_time5 min.
punching the light

Simon Burstall keeps having flashbacks. Nearly every day for the past year, memories of thumping raves – the ones that shaped his teenage years – keep catching him off-guard. It could be a car park packed with loved-up strangers still dancing at 10am; train stations filled with light so piercing that it could rip through your eyeballs; the smile of a DJ who died way too soon; old people shaking their heads at the waste of youth. The Australian has been busy making a book about that time, so it makes sense that these scenes have been coming back to life. But even when he’s busy doing something else entirely, the echo of a moment will announce itself with a rush of goosebumps. “Truth be told, it’s pretty great,” says Simon, now…

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