EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Home & Garden
Kitchen Garden

Kitchen Garden

November 2020

Kitchen Garden Magazine - UK's No.1 for growing your own fruit and vegetables. KG also offers great monthly give-aways, special gardening offers, recipes, growing tips and much more.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Mortons Media Group, Ltd
Frequency:
Monthly
Read More
BUY ISSUE
£2.50
SUBSCRIBE
£27.49
12 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
welcome

With autumn in full swing you may be forgiven for thinking that there is not much to do other than to harvest the remnants of your summer crops and start on the hardy veg that has been slowly growing since spring. However, as our jobs pages show this month, there is still plenty to do to keep those harvests coming and lots to think about if 2021 is going to be a bumper year on the plot. Turn to page 56 to find out what no-dig gardener Stephanie Hafferty is sowing and growing on her plot this month, while on page 36 KG regular Rob Smith offers his advice on growing pungent garlic – what are the best varieties and the techniques needed to grow, harvest and store your best-ever cloves. Deputy editor…

1 min.
jobs for the month

10 MINUTE JOBS USE LAST LEAVES Leaves fall over a number of weeks and this usually comes to an end in November. Add a thin layer of autumn leaves to the compost heap. This helps to balance out the layers of nitrogen-rich kitchen scraps and grass clippings. VENTILATE CLOCHES AND FRAMES These structures help to protect plants against cold, wet weather, but impermeable covers can lead to hot and humid contents. Be prepared to open cloches and frames to allow good ventilation on sunny November days and remember to close them up again. CHECK STRING Twine made from natural materials will rot over time. Check all places where you have used it to tie up tall plants and replace, or add in more, as needed. It’s better to add in an extra tie or two than…

5 min.
on the veg patch

HARVEST PARSNIPS These roots get sweeter the more plants are exposed to frosts. Having said that, texture suffers if roots freeze and they can be eaten by slugs and rodents if left in the ground too long. You can just dig roots as needed and cover the rest of the row with some straw, or layers of cardboard – this small bit of extra insulation can prevent roots from freezing solid. It is probably safest to lift the crop now and put roots to store between layers of sand in a cool, dry shed. Use them before they sprout new green leaves in the spring – roots can turn woody and tough at this stage. STEP BY STEP: GROW EARLY BROAD BEANS STEP 1: You can sow seed of winter hardy varieties directly in…

4 min.
in the greenhouse

WHAT TO DO IN NOVEMBER There is still time to plant garlic into the greenhouse or polytunnel border but do it by mid-November to give it time to establish a root system before winter. Bring potted figs back undercover if they’ve been out over the summer. This helps protect the embryo fruitlets There is just about time to sow some fast-growing salad leaves to enjoy as baby leaves in early winter. Check through leafy salad or brassica vegetables and remove any yellow or dead leaves around the base of the plants. Keep harvesting salads crops and other fresh produce from the polytunnel or greenhouse on a regular basis. PICK THE LAST OF YOUR TOMATOES Very often you can keep tomato plants going into early November, especially if the autumn weather has been…

4 min.
what’s new?

LARGE SPIKE IN ALLOTMENT APPLICATIONS The National Allotment Society has reported that councils across the UK have seen a 40% increase in applications, with a staggering 300% increase in one case. According to the Association for Public Service Excellence, which works to support local councils, the average waiting time for an allotment plot is 6-18 months, with some councils saying they had 100-400 people on their waiting list. Wilfred Emmanuel-Jones, founder of the Black Farmer food brand said: “The Government, Ministry of Defence and Church of England all own vast swathes of land and could be doing a lot more to welcome people from diverse urban cultures – but particularly black people – into allotments and ultimately into the countryside. Gatekeepers of pastoral Britain have the power to make a difference and…

1 min.
send us your letters - everyone’s a winner

Send us your tips and pictures and if your letter is published you will get a £10 Dobies voucher. If you are lucky enough to have yours chosen as our Star Letter you will get a £25 voucher. Your voucher will be sent out with a Dobies catalogue and you can choose to spend your winnings on a fabulous range of seeds, young plants and gardening sundries. You can get hold of a copy of the catalogue now by phoning 0844 701 7625 or go online to www.dobies.co.uk You can reach us by letter, email or via our Facebook page: FACEBOOK.COM/ KITCHENGARDENMAG Email your letters to tflanagan@mortons. co.uk or post to Letters, Kitchen Garden, Mortons Media Group, Media Centre, Morton Way, Horncastle, Lincs LN9 6JR…