EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Home & Garden
Landscape MagazineLandscape Magazine

Landscape Magazine March 2019

LandScape magazine is a breath of fresh air, capturing the very best of every season. Every two months, join us to: - Celebrate the joy of the garden - Learn simple seasonal recipes - Enjoy traditional British crafts - Wonder at the beauty of nature and the countryside The magazine is a haven from the pressures of modern living; a chance to slow down... and most importantly, a reminder of the good things in life. Take time to appreciate everything that nature creates and inspires.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Bauer Media Ltd
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
SPECIAL: Get 40% OFF with code: BDAY40
BUY ISSUE
£4.02(Incl. tax)
SUBSCRIBE
£25(Incl. tax)
7 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
dear reader...

MARCH BRINGS WITH it the first tantalising whispers of spring. Frost is still very much a possibility, but daylight hours are slowly unfolding, and sunset will soon inch past 6pm: a milestone.Days when the sun nourishes the countryside with a passing spell of warmth feel like a gift; a brief moment to be savoured in an otherwise blustery and unpredictable month.On one such day, the birds are congregating on feeders I have hung close to my dining room window. I love to sit and watch them. Reading or knitting, I am distracted from my pursuit every now and then by their protests.Blue tits hop back and forth, heads twitching, ever alert. A collared dove sits at a distance, nodding slowly as it ponders how to join the throng.…

access_time1 min.
star letter

Valuable lessonMy Christmas present each year is a subscription to LandScape magazine, and I love the pace, the articles and craft sections. Here is a craft project using old household items, card, twigs and pine cones. It is an audio, sensory, illuminated display for young children, encouraging them to listen, touch and watch. I work as an artist-in-residence in schools and have observed how children, ever preoccupied with technology, are at risk of losing the basic fundamentals of childhood: puddle jumping, getting muddy, painting, sculpting and making a mess. LandScape encourages the reader to enjoy ‘Life at nature’s pace’, and if only this could be extended to our children because real life should be celebrated. Deborah Fulford, by email ■…

access_time4 min.
readers’ letters

Keeping up with the seasonsMy wife and I have subscribed to LandScape for more than a year now, and we delight in its varied content, breathtaking images and superb writing. I have to smile every time the latest issue drops through the letterbox and I see the tag line, ‘Life at nature’s pace’, because it always arrives at least four weeks before the month to which it refers. It takes me all my willpower to put it to one side until nature has caught up with the publishing and postal deadlines. I do not mind; it means there is even more to look forward to. Stuart Otley, Northumberland From garden to the drawing boardI loved the Molesworths’ topiary garden article in the December 2018…

access_time1 min.
star letter prize

This issue’s star letter writer will receive a bundle of kitchen fabric essentials from British homewares designer Sophie Allport. The lucky winner will be sent an apron, double oven glove and tea towel from Sophie’s new floral Peony collection, worth £48.50. For more information or to view the full collection, visit www.sophieallport.com or phone 01778 560256. ■…

access_time3 min.
our landscape

CAPERCAILLIE CALLING The capercaillie, Gaelic for ‘great cock of the wood’, is the largest bird in the grouse family, with the turkey-sized males weighing up to 11lbs (5kg). In March, cocks begin contesting for the best breeding territory, known as a lek, before mating begins properly later in the season. Beak held aloft, huge black tail fanned out and throat feathers bristling, it patrols the area, emitting a creaky call, followed by a succession of clicks and a final ‘pop’, like a cork from a bottle. In Britain, it is found exclusively in the pinewoods of the Highlands, with the majority in the Cairngorms National Park. At this time of year, the birds, which are critically endangered in the UK and very difficult to spot, are extremely sensitive to…

access_time10 min.
surprises within a hidden garden

A serrated yew hedge forms the backdrop to the canal garden, where crown imperials, Fritillaria imperialis, are surrounded by narcissi and pulmonaria. Mops of black Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’ frame the path. IN A LEAFY part of West Yorkshire on the edge of farmland, north of Leeds, is a hidden gem, regarded by many as one of Britain’s finest 20th century gardens. Along a country lane, past an ancient Norman church, is the entrance to York Gate, which, on an early spring day as hints of warmth slowly return, is beginning to burst back into life.When Frederick and Sybil Spencer and their teenage son, Robin first came to York Gate in Adel in 1951, it was just a stone-built Victorian house surrounded by farm fields. The family kept horses and…

help