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FEATURED
EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
 / Home & Garden
Landscape Magazine

Landscape Magazine January 2020

LandScape magazine is a breath of fresh air, capturing the very best of every season. Every two months, join us to: - Celebrate the joy of the garden - Learn simple seasonal recipes - Enjoy traditional British crafts - Wonder at the beauty of nature and the countryside The magazine is a haven from the pressures of modern living; a chance to slow down... and most importantly, a reminder of the good things in life. Take time to appreciate everything that nature creates and inspires.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
H BAUER PUBLISHING LIMITED
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7 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

1 min.
dear reader...

EVEN IN THE coldest month, there is much to experience in the countryside. So, on a freezing day, I step out into the weak sunlight to enjoy a short walk before the light fades, and the warmth of a fire and a mug of tea drag me back indoors. January has a stark beauty. Nature’s framework is revealed in trees and bushes devoid of leaves, their intricate network of branches still and lifeless. Despite appearances, a closer look reveals buds patiently waiting for their moment to burst forth. Following the line of a bramble hedge, the path climbs slowly. I walk with purpose; coat fastened to the top; my warmest hat pulled down as far as it will go. Halfway up the hill, I notice some tiny shapes in the trees. A…

4 min.
readers’ letters

In praise of a superior apple I was recently introduced to LandScape magazine and cannot say how refreshing it is to have such a great selection of interesting articles without the interminable adverts. A very pleasant surprise in October’s issue was ‘Sweet Harvest’, commenting on our many varieties of apples, including the history of the ‘Bramley’s Seedling’. Henry Merryweather was my great-grandfather, and the culinary world owes much to his foresight and the great qualities of this apple. In qualification, the recipe for the Bramley and cider pudding cake is definitely worth the effort. I look forward to more excellent cooking and reading in the future. Eileen Connet, Northumberland Rare encounter at the water’s edge As a longtime subscriber to LandScape, I have always admired the quality of the photography and writing accompanying the…

1 min.
star letter prize

This issue’s Star Letter writer wins a brilliant bundle from Dairy Diary. It comprises a Dairy Diary, Pocket Diary, Notebook and Quick After-Work Cookbook. With week-to-view pages, there is plenty of space to write in the Dairy Diary, which also features a triple-tested recipe each week, fascinating features, a useful notes pocket and stickers. The Quick After-Work Cookbook is crammed full of nutritious and delicious meals to prepare in half an hour or less. To find out more, visit www.dairydiary.co.uk…

1 min.
landscape magazine

Editor Rachel Hawkins Associate Editor Karen Youngs Production Editor Deborah Dunham Features Editor Holly Duerden Art Editor Lindsay Lombardi Editorial Assistant Natalie Simister Home Economist Liz O’Keefe ADVERTISING – Phone 01733 468000 Group Advertisement Director Trevor Newman Commercial Director Iain Grundy Key Account Director Lawrence Cavill Grant Sales Executive Lucy Baxter Sales Executive Stuart Day MARKETING – Phone 01733 468000 Brand Manager Stephanie O’Keeffe Product Manager Amy Kirton Digital Marketing Assistant Kate Burton Direct Marketing Manager Julie Spires Direct Marketing Executive Amy Dedman Newstrade Marketing Manager Stacey Risk Head of Newstrade Marketing Leon Benoiton PRODUCTION – Phone 01733 468000 Print Production Colin Robinson Printed by William Gibbons & Sons Ltd Distributed by Frontline H BAUER PUBLISHING MD Women’s Specialist Kim Slaney MD Sport and Leisure Oswin Grady Editorial Director June Smith-Sheppard Head of Digital Charlie Calton-Watson Chief Financial Officer Bauer Magazine Media Lisa Hayden CEO Bauer Publishing UK Rob Munro-Hall…

3 min.
our landscape

CAPTURED IN SOFTNESS A solitary whitewashed house sits under a swirling ashen grey sky, blushed with rosy pink. Captured in felt, the picture is made using wet and needle felting techniques and finished with embroidery, to add the finer details. Inspired by a love of the coast, artist Alison Kemp based this design on a house called The Lookout, which sits on a hill overlooking the sea, near to her Devonshire home. It measures approximately 13 x 13cm and comes with an oak frame, which is lightweight and easy to hang. Winter Snow Felt Picture £44, www.etsy.com/uk/shop/StudioDevon A WINTER’S SONG On a slender branch coated in nature’s frosting, a robin redbreast perches expectantly, its plaintive song fluting from a shiny black bill. In mild winters, courtship starts as early as January, and the male…

9 min.
the frosted garden

THE LOW WINTER sun brings a touch of magic to the Somerset countryside on a frosty January afternoon. Among the side-lit skeletal trees and ghost-bare fields, Yarlington House sits like an exquisite dolls’ house, encompassed by the framework of its handsome gardens. The shape and symmetry of the elegant 18th century building is echoed by rows of pleached limes, box and yew hedges. The outlines are etched keen and flawless in silver, creating a faultless illustration of classic design and period architecture. When the Count and Countess de Salis, Charles and Carolyn, bought the house more than 50 years ago, they began the gardens from scratch. “It had no garden of any sort,” says Carolyn. “Charles simply told me one morning: ‘I’ve bought a house.’ It’s what you did in those…