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Landscape Photography WorkshopLandscape Photography Workshop

Landscape Photography Workshop

Landscape Photography Workshop

Landscape Photography Workshops is an invaluable guide packed with essential technique advice, expert guides, photo workshops and stunning photography that aims to give you all the information, advice and inspiration you need to improve your landscape photography skills. It is brimming with tutorials from many of the UK’s favourite outdoor photographers, with emphasis on key in-camera techniques. To ensure you head out with the best possible choice of photo gear, we have provided a landscape kit section filled with authoritative reviews of essential accessories, including ND graduated filters, backpacks and ultra wide-angle zooms.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dennis Publishing UK
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access_time2 min.
welcome...

“For countless enthusiast photographers the world over, nothing offers as much inspiration as heading out into the great outdoors, regardless of the time of year or weather conditions, to capture beautiful landscapes. while the uk has a relatively small landmass, it’s recognised as boasting some of the world’s most stunning vistas and offers dedicated photographers the potential to capture a diversity of landscapes within a relatively small area. Landscape Photography Workshops is an invaluable guide packed with essential technique advice, expert guides, photo workshops and stunning photography that aims to give you all the information, advice and inspiration you need to improve your landscape photography skills. it’s brimming with tutorials from many of the uk’s favourite outdoor photographers, with emphasis on key in-camera techniques. to ensure you head out with…

access_time3 min.
landscape composition

HOW YOU DECIDE to frame your shot will either make or break it. Teaching or giving advice on composition is actually a very tricky thing to do, though. It is a creative skill and therefore an intensely personal thing. What one person likes, another will not – you could argue that there is no right or wrong. That said, there are many long-standing and widely accepted compositional guidelines that will help you capture consistently well-composed shots. The rule-of-thirds, foreground interest, and lead-in lines are among the most useful compositional aids – all of which we will be covering in detail over the next few pages. The rules will help you organise the elements within the landscape in a logical and aesthetically pleasing way, but there are other considerations too that can…

access_time2 min.
using the rule-of-thirds

The rule-of-thirds is actually quite simple to understand and apply to your photography. imagine two horizontal and two vertical lines dividing the image space into a grid of nine equal parts. Where the lines intersect are said to be ‘power points’: the points of the image where our eyes most naturally visit. According to the theory, by placing key elements of your composition on or near one of these points, you can capture a more balanced, harmonious and visually stimulating composition. this rule is a much simplified version of a theory called the ‘golden ratio’, which dates all the way back to the ancient Greeks. Quite simply, the rule-of-thirds works. using the grid, you can arrange the different components in the scene, usually beginning with the horizon, which is often best…

access_time2 min.
foreground interest

WHILE IT is certainly not essential to include foreground interest in your landscapes, more often than not it is beneficial. not only will foreground elements entice the viewer’s eye into the frame, but a good foreground can be the most effective tool for creating the illusion of depth. Almost anything can be used, so long as it is appropriate and complementary to the scene. rocks, boulders, tree roots, sand patterns, reflections, fallen leaves and wildflowers are popular foreground objects. Your foreground subject should help balance your composition and add a degree of scale and context. The most common advice, in regards to foreground interest, is to get in close and go wide. By doing so you emphasise nearby objects, extend perspective and open up the view beyond. however, capturing great landscape…

access_time2 min.
learn to use lead-in lines

THE LANDSCAPE is full of lines and shapes – both naturally occurring and man-made, straight and curved – that your eye instinctively follows into an image. pathways, roads, bridges, a jetty, stream or wall are a handful of examples. however, not all lead-in lines are quite so obvious. some are more subtle, like a tree avenue, a row of objects, patterns in the sand or even waves breaking on the shore. not only will a lead-in line help give your images the impression of depth, but they can also link the subject and foreground. By using a lead-in line, you are effectively able to control the way the viewer will read your photo. A lead-in line should create a path for the eye to follow through the image space. avoid lines…

access_time4 min.
creative composition

“RULES ARE USEFUL GUIDELINES THAT SHOULD BE APPLIED WHEN APPROPRIATE, BUTIGNORED WHEN THE OPPORTUNITY ALLOWS” 1) USING COLOURWITHINTHE SCENE Colour can be a significant ingredient when composing landscapes, so its influence shouldn’t be underestimated. While we obviously can’t control or alter the colours found within the landscape, we do have the ability to decide what we do and don’t include within the frame. Colours can be harmonious or conflicting; warm or cold; vibrant or muted. Colour is great at grabbing attention, while a photo’s overall tone will often help determine its mood – so colour has an important visual and emotional effect too. For example, photographs taken during twilight will typically adopt a cool blue cast, which is considered tranquil, cold and calming. A little understanding of colour theory is useful as a photographer.…

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