EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Tech & Gaming
Linux Format

Linux Format February 2020

Linux Format is your complete guide to the world of Linux. Whether you've just discovered Linux, or you're a full-time guru, Linux Format has everything you need to make the most of your OS. The editorial formula is a mix of features, reviews and practical tutorials that tackle topics as far ranging as installing software to socket programming and network management. Thought-provoking features and interviews also provide a focus on key technologies, trends and issues in the fast-paced world of Free and Open Source software.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
Monthly
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13 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
who we are

Jonni Bidwell I was remiss in not mentioning cool-retro-term in my feature. It may be quite a frivolous waste of system resources, but if you’re going to be stuck at the command line you may as well make it look stylish with cathode ray-style scanlines, snow and colour bleeding. Nick Peers If you’re struggling to get Windows programs running in Linux using Wine, I recommend investing in CrossOver for Linux (www.codeweavers.com). It’s much easier to use than Wine or PlayOnLinux. Les Pounder When I switched from Windows to Linux, I was amazed by the sheer choice of free software. In fact it overwhelmed me, and I ended up installing lots of things. My advice is to try as many applications and Linux distros as you can handle. Find what works for you! Calvin Robinson Let’s be honest,…

1 min.
welcome to linux

It’s 2020 and there’s no doubt that this is the year of Linux on the desktop. That’s the running joke among the Linux community, but the truth hiding behind it, is that there are millions of happy desktop Linux users out there in the world and this is your chance to join them. If you’d told many people ten years ago Linux would be getting same-day driver support from manufacturers, you could game with Steam and play AAA titles natively on Linux, run a full office suite that is used by governments, render with software used by the largest game and film companies, that it was going to run the majority of mobile phones, and that a best-selling home computer (that’s the Pi) used it, they’d think you were mad. However,…

2 min.
all of canonical’s big 2020 plans revealed

Canonical is hard at work on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, and it looks like the upcoming release could bring some big changes and new features, according to the project’s Trello board (which can be seen at http://bit.ly/LXF259Trello). So, the team are working on continuing to improve the performance of Gnome in Ubuntu, while also working on ZFS and Zsys support. On the installation front, the Ubiquity installer will be improved to help people install on desktops with RAID arrays, while the live patching process is also getting updated. Gamers will benefit from Feral Interactive’s GameMode (more info at http://bit.ly/LXF259Feral), which lets users easily optimise their PCs to eke out the best performance when gaming. Interestingly, it appears that Canonical is also working on improving support for fingerprint biometric devices at the request…

2 min.
librem 5 is now in backers’ hands

Early, mostly working prototypes of the Librem 5 smartphone have been shipping out to some of the first backers of the project, following a short delay as the team encountered some unexpected hardware issues. According to Ars Technica (http://bit.ly/LXF259Librem5Ars), late in the production of the Librem 5, it was discovered that a batch of phone boards were missing a 10kOhm resistor. With that issue sorted, early backers began to receive their handsets. However, these are prototypes that are missing many features – some of them essential for a phone. As Ars Technica reports, an owner of a Librem 5 has told the site that there’s no audio when making a phone call. The camera also doesn’t seem to work, many apps don’t install and there’s no power management – so the…

1 min.
germany considers open source

The CDU, Germany’s ruling party, has passed a resolution to demand that software developed with public money will also be made publicly available as free software. As the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) notes in a press release (which can be read at http://bit.ly/LXF259FSFE),this move aligns with the FSFE’s “Public Money, Public Code!” campaign, which is supported by over 170 organisations and 26,000 individuals. The CDU’s convention resolution (find it her: http://bit.ly/LXF259CDU) declares that, “It is only through openness that competition can be created; only through openness can new players in competition challenge the top dogs,” and that all future public… projects in Germany will “be subject to compliance with the principles of open source and open standards.” Matthias Kirschner, president of FSFE, welcomed the move: “We are pleased that our…

1 min.
turn on, tune in...

“Well so far so good – I haven’t been extraordinarily rendered following my incendiary hacking feature last issue. And hopefully no one tries to lynch me as a result of my perpetuating the myth that anyone can switch to Linux. This whole pretend tech journalism lark is a hazardous occupation. You really should switch to Linux though, it’s great. For many years I have held the secret suspicion that self-anointed “Windows power users” are the ones that have most difficulty with Linux. Now I make this suspicion public. The thing is, those people really make life difficult for themselves. Those skills don’t transfer over to Linux at all. If you go looking for out-of-tree drivers before you learn that most hardware is supported in the kernel, or if you go trying…