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Little White LiesLittle White Lies

Little White Lies September - October 2015

The freshest and most credible voice in film, LWLies is the world's most stunning film source. Honest, unmerciful, relevant - and always beautiful.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Church of London
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time3 min.
legend

Released9 SEPTEMBER 3 ANTICIPATION.Can’t be worse than the 1990 Kemp bros vehicle. Can it? 2 ENJOYMENT.It is.. 2 IN RETROSPECT.Might as well be prefixed with the words ‘Print the’. There’s no real evidence to suggest that Reggie Kray had a fancy for lemon sherbets. And yet writer/director Brian Helgeland has Tom Hardy routinely sucking on the sweets during early meet-cutes with Emily Browning’s Frances Shea, the wholesome 16-year-old club owner’s daughter who endured a tumultuous marriage to Reg. It’s the kind of clunky visual metaphor – he’s a tough bloke with a soft centre, you see – masquerading as a genuine character trait that reveals far more about Helgeland’s screenwriting ability (or lack thereof ) than his chosen subject. Come to think of it, that’s quite a handy metaphor after all. Because break its hard, shiny exterior and…

access_time3 min.
just jim

Released25 SEPTEMBER 3 ANTICIPATION.It’s that kid who’s in all those films! 3 ENJOYMENT.All over the shop, but much about it is bold and lovable. 3 IN RETROSPECT.We’ve not seen the end of this Roberts character (in a good way). Beware of false idols – the unequivocal message behind the directorial debut by eye-wateringly young Welsh actor, Craig Roberts. Introduced to the world as a duffel coatwearing nebbish in Richard Ayoade’s cutesy-pie rom-com, Submarine, from 2010, Roberts has chosen to pay homage to his erstwhile collaborator while also adding something new and macabre into the mix. In Just Jim, exteriors are alienatingly pallid, the Welsh landscape sitting quietly underneath a floating gauze of dewy mist. The interiors are meshed with shadowy bars, like there’s been a town-wide power cut and no-one can be bothered to change the fuses. Jim…

access_time3 min.
il cinema ritrovato

It feels wrong to besmirch the good name of Bologna’s annual Il Cinema Ritrovato with the epithet of ‘film festival’, as it’s a term which has come to signify a commercially-driven gathering which has more in common with a country meat market than a celebration of the seventh art. A pass for entry into every screening costs a paltry sum (LWLies personal average price per film was €1.60), there’s no-one on the door checking bags or evoking an atmosphere of Cold War paranoia, most films are screened on 35mm prints, and – most vitally – everyone seems happy to be there. There is smiling and laughing. Imagine? The programme consists entirely of archive features, selected by a cadre of trusted cinephile lifers and overseen by the charismatic, novelty-spectacled Gian Luca…

access_time2 min.
miss you already

Released25 SEPTEMBER Charity worker Jess (Drew Barrymore) and PR executive Milly (Toni Colette) have been friends since school, but when Milly is diagnosed with cancer, their relationship is placed under duress. Their favourite book growing up was ‘Wuthering Heights’, and its themes of cruelty and vengefulness are explored in the context of a cancer patient who is angry at the world. Opening in a similar bittersweet manner to Garry Marshall’s 1988 film, Beaches, itself an era-spanning drama focusing on a female-female friendship, the film introduces Jess as she’s about to give birth at the end of the story. She’s alone, and the only thing she wants is her best friend by her side. Despite the wealth of female talent involved, the core relationship between the two women rarely feels convincing, and…

access_time4 min.
horse money

Released18 SEPTEMBER 5 ANTICIPATION.The Portuguese master’s first fiction feature in almost a decade. 5 ENJOYMENT.A beautiful and grotesque evocation of repressed cultural memory. 5 IN RETROSPECT.One of the most impressive accomplishments of Costa’s career. Pedro Costa’s Horse Money, the Portuguese filmmaker’s first fiction feature in over eight years, crescendos with an intensely cerebral 20-minute sequence set inside an elevator in which a flood of dialogue works to collapse an entire history’s worth of personal and political tragedy in one virtuoso display of accumulated aggression. Undeniably bracing, the scene – a slightly reworked version of Costa’s 2012 short Sweet Exorcism (originally featured in the Centro Histórico omnibus film) – is but the final and most violent example of the film’s foremost allegorical conceit, that of indoor space as physical manifestation of repressed cultural memory. In Costa’s cinema, the…

access_time2 min.
jean cocteau’s beauty and the beast + georges franju’s eyes without a face

#2 Two films inspired by Guillermo del Toro's Crimson Peak Mexican director Guillermo del Toro is outspoken when it comes to the classic movies that have directly inspired his artistic process. And when he does namedrop a Hitchcock here or a James Whale there, its generally quite easy to see how this inspiration has taken seed with his own rich and singular oeuvre. We have selected two films of which he regularly professes a great love: Jean Cocteau’s Beauty and the Beast from 1946 and Georges Franju’s Eyes Without a Face from 1960. This pair of romantic horror movies are to be viewed as a double bill, the former screening on MUBI for 30 days, the latter receiving a one-off event presentation at LWLies’ 71a gallery on Thursday 15 October with…

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