EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Travel & Outdoor
Lonely PlanetLonely Planet

Lonely Planet May 2018

Feed your love of travel with award-winning Lonely Planet. Inside you'll find topical ideas for easy inspirational weekend breaks and more adventurous experiences to try out, helped by the insider knowledge of Lonely Planet's many experts around the world. You'll be taken on a journey through words and beautiful photography, with highly atmospheric features transporting you to spectacular landscapes and allowing local people to reveal their culture, history ,food, drink and the natural wonders that surround them.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
BBC Worldwide Limited
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
BUY ISSUE
£4(Incl. tax)
SUBSCRIBE
£29.99(Incl. tax)
12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
editor’s note

I’m typing this with the wobbliness of fingers that comes from a mix of excitement and frayed nerves. The Lonely Planet magazine team has been brainstorming, researching, designing and writing flat-out over the past few months to introduce the biggest changes to your magazine since I started work on its launch over nine (nine!) years ago. Our mission, more than ever, is to give you reasons to turn to us for ideas for original travel experiences and to feed your curiosity about the world – giving you a friendly refuge among the many apps, websites, social channels, books and blogs that vie to do the same. We’ve introduced new front sections called Explore (p9) and Journal (p33) that up the pace and deliver more across the board: more local…

access_time3 min.
hongdae, seoul

JUST AN ILLUSION ‘The Trick Eye Museum houses a number of surprises. First up is the museum itself – visitors step into 3D art installations and an optical illusion makes it seem as if they’re diving into a dragon’s mouth or floating over a waterfall. There’s also an Ice Museum, with a 10-metre ice slide, and the Love Museum – to all intents and purposes, a museum about sex.’ trickeye.com/seoul/en READING MATERIAL ‘Thanks Books has a serious following of fans. It’s a well-curated store that sells books, magazines and art catalogues in both Korean and English. There’s a café, too, and local creatives flock here to enjoy its unique atmosphere.’ 57-6 Yanghwa-ro CULTURE BLOCK ‘Sangsang Madang is a lovely independent cinema…

access_time1 min.
berlin

STAY € 105 Book a loft apartment at the Michelberger, the hotel that most encapsulates Berlin’s creative DIY spirit. Expect industrial-style rooms, friendly staff and live music in the lobby. michelbergerhotel.com DO € 15 Head underground on a guided visit to tunnels burrowed under the Berlin Wall, and hear tales of escapes, subterfuge and capture during the days of the Stasi. berliner-unterwelten.de LUNCH € 10 Grab a pizza and a beer at Clärchens Ballhaus, a 19th-century music hall complete with a parquet dance floor, ornate Mirror Hall and pretty garden. ballhaus.de BUY € 40 Pick up an Ampelmännchen sweatshirt at the official shop; the green and red ‘traffic-light men’ from the former East adorn everything from deck chairs to sweet tins. ampelmann.de DINNER € 70 Tuck into organic, farm-to-table dishes,…

access_time1 min.
europe’s national parks

NORWAY Jotunheimen National Park In Norway everyone enjoys ‘allemannsretten’: free access to the countryside, including national parks. Jotunheimen is home to myriad hiking routes; tackling the 8.6-mile Besseggen Ridge trail is something of a rite of passage for Norwegians. jotunheimen.com GERMANY Bavarian Forest National Park Europe’s largest forest is where Bavaria meets Czech Bohemia, with plenty of cycling, hiking and skiing trails within. More than 10,000 animal species inhabit these woods and you can join them: wild (and free) camping is allowed within the park’s borders. nationalpark-bayerischer-wald.de ITALY Gran Paradiso National Park Once the hunting ground of a Sardinian king, today ‘Great Paradise’ is the preserve of hikers, climbers, skiers – and the Alpine ibex, which gads about the upper slopes. The big attraction is…

access_time1 min.
springtime in spain

Set on a slender, foot-shaped bend where the canyon of the Guadalaviar River carves through the hilly badlands of southern Aragón, the town of Albarracín is a place seemingly bypassed by the centuries. Houses of dusky-pink stone with wooden galleries press close together under sturdy fortress walls that march uphill. Step into one of the town squares and you half expect to hear a film director shout, ‘And... action!’ to the extras of a Don Quixote remake. Albarracín is a two-hour drive from Valencia in a region that’s untouristy by Spanish standards, and it’s well worth visiting in spring, before the mercury rises towards the ‘uncomfortable’ mark. Much of the appeal comes from exploring at your own pace, deciding whether the town deserves its reputation as Spain’s most beautiful…

access_time3 min.
the cornish coast

Clockwise from top left: Artist Residence Penzance; St Ives; a Cornish pasty; the village of Zennor; a sign in St Ives FRIDAY NIGHT 1 Penzance Start your weekend by checking into one of the rustic-luxe rooms at Artist Residence Penzance (from £136), a few minutes’ walk from the seafront. As the name suggests, each of the 22 rooms is decorated by a local artist. For dinner, tuck into home-smoked pork ribs or whole roasted sea bass at in-house restaurant the Cornish Barn (mains from £14), where ‘local’ and ‘seasonal’ are the name of the game. artistresidence.co.uk;thecornishbarn.co.uk SATURDAY MORNING 2 St Michael’s Mount After a wander round the narrow streets of Penzance – once the preserve of smugglers and pirates, now more likely…

help