EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Photography
Master Your Camera In 4 Weeks

Master Your Camera In 4 Weeks

Master Your Camera In 4 Weeks

Putting your camera phone down and picking up a high-spec camera can be a daunting prospect for anyone. DSLRs can appear terribly over-complicated in order to meet the needs of photographers of varying levels. What the beginner photographer really needs is a no-nonsense guide to the most important features on their camera written by experts. Master Your Camera in 4 Weeks aims to take you on a photographic adventure, from unboxing your camera to pursuing more creative endeavours. This book will take you from complete beginner to a skilled camera user in just four weeks. Learn how to compose your images, understand shutter speed, aperture, ISO and more. At the end of each week take on eight simple and practical tasks to help hone your skills, and then once you have completed week four use the last chapter to take things further. So, what are you waiting for? Start learning today!

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
One-off
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in this issue

1 min.
welcome to master your camera in 4 weeks

Putting your camera phone down and picking up a high-spec camera can be a daunting prospect for anyone. DSLRs can appear terribly over-complicated in order to meet the needs of photographers of varying levels. What the beginner photographer really needs is a no-nonsense guide to the most important features on their camera written by experts. Master Your Camera in 4 Weeks aims to take you on a photographic adventure, from unboxing your camera to pursuing more creative endeavours. This book will take you from complete beginner to a skilled camera user in just four weeks. Learn how to compose your images, understand shutter speed, aperture, ISO and more. At the end of each week take on eight simple and practical tasks to help hone your skills, and then once you…

1 min.
getting started

Getting a new camera – or even picking up an old one for the first time in a while – can feel like a daunting process. It can hard to know where to start with all the buttons, settings and techniques on modern models. That’s why in this book, we’re going to be showing you how to take full control of your camera – in just four weeks. That means being able to shoot landscapes, portraits and travel shots with ease and enjoyment. Once you fully understand how your camera works, as well as what it can do, shooting should become so much more intuitive and fun. We’ll be talking about switching to manual mode and controlling all the camera settings yourself, how to expose your scenes effectively, and later on,…

3 min.
picking your first camera

01 CAMERA TYPE With so many camera options, which is for you? DSLRs are still the most popular – from beginners to pros – as they typically have larger sensors, plus a comprehensive range of compatible lenses and accessories. They can be bulky, though. Mirrorless cameras share many features with a DSLR in a smaller, lighter body, but the disadvantage is that their sensors are often comparably smaller than those in DSLRs. 02 SENSOR SIZE The size of a camera sensor determines how much light it uses to create an image. This is why, in general, larger sensor provide the best lowlight noise performance and background blur (bokeh). DSLR cameras come with either full-frame or crop-frame sensors. If you’re starting out, a smaller (more affordable) crop-frame sensor should be ample for your needs.…

3 min.
picking your first set of lenses

01 FOCUSING RING Most modern lenses have advanced autofocus systems that are capable of locking onto subjects. While you can change the focus to manual with a switch on the side of most lenses, some can only be used with manual focus – think macro or ‘creative’ lenses. Turning the focus ring on your lens adjusts the focus. On a zoom lens, there’s also find a zoom ring closest to the body of the camera. 02 FOCAL LENGTH When you choose a new lens, the first thing to consider is the focal length. This is number in millimeters that tells you whether the lens is a wide-angle or telephoto (zoom) lens. While a zoom lens with a large focal length enables you to get close to faraway subjects, a wider lens with a…

3 min.
filling your kit bag – essential accessories tips

01 NEUTRAL DENSITY (ND) FILTER An ND filter allows you to darken, reduce and therefore limit the amount of light that can enter your camera. The best time to use an ND is to create long exposures when the light is otherwise too bright to allow you to do that. An ND filter would also be useful if you wanted to use a wide aperture and blur out the background without overexposing the photo 02 TRIPOD A sturdy tripod will be carried, rather than going in your camera bag. It’s one of the most common bits of photography kit, offering stability to your photos. With your camera mounted on a sturdy tripod base, you’ll be able to get more creative with composition, and to use settings such as long exposures for creative effects…

1 min.
software and manual

Your camera’s instruction manual might not seem the most interesting read, but it will prove very handy if you ever get stuck, so make sure it’s always in your kit bag. If you’re unsure where to find certain features or your camera is doing something you weren’t expecting, the manual will most likely provide a solution. You can also download a digital version of your camera’s manual from the manufacturer’s website. You’ll notice, too, that your camera comes with free software that will help you to organise and edit your shots, and it’s a good idea to install this right away. Simply insert the disc into your computer and follow the on-screen instructions. Keep the software running smoothly by downloading regular updates from your camera manufacturer’s website.…