EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Health & Fitness
Men's Health South Africa

Men's Health South Africa July 2019

Men's Health is South Africa's best-selling men's magazine. And no wonder: each page is packed with expert tips and easy-to-implement, actionable advice on everything the modern man needs to feel fitter, happier and healthier. Through its award-winning content and design, Men's Health improves every aspect of a man's life, from physical and mental health to food, style, sex, stress, gear, grooming, tech, relationships, wealth, career and beyond. It's an essential read for any guy who wants to live his best life right now. That's you, right?

Country:
South Africa
Language:
English
Publisher:
Media 24 Ltd
Frequency:
Back issues only
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in this issue

1 min.
man of action

“For me, the toughest parts are during the training, and not over the seven days – that’s fuelled by adrenaline and hype. It’s getting through the seven months of mundane – and in many cases, solo – hours of training to get you to the start line that puts you in the precarious position of potentially giving up.” – OLIVER BATH, SOUTH AFRICAN RUN777 MARATHON RUNNER FIND MOTIVATION. When your motivation in winter starts to waiver, turn to others, says Joburg-born Oliver Bath, who in May this year – alongside Todd Hussey and Nicholas Shraga – completed seven marathons in seven days across seven countries. They spent seven months training for this feat. “Although the bulk of the training is done solo, using platforms that log and share your training activities…

2 min.
age is but a number

This is our annual Fit at Any Age issue. The theme could not be more apt for a guy of my age, following in the giant footsteps of my predecessors, Arthur Jones and Jason Brown – both great men and great editors, from whom I have gained so much knowledge and wisdom over the last eight and ahalf years at Men’s Health. This issue contains tools, tips and advice to help you look, feel and perform at your best – regardless of whether you’re 25 or 55. Here are 10 great lessons you’ll learn from this issue, no matter what your age: 1.VISUALISEYOURACTIVITY– our brains don’t know the difference between imagining something and doing it. Practise your training in your head. 2.CONFRONTYOURWORSTMEMORY– a different perspective could change your life. 3.EMBRACEYOURCOREVALUES– enjoyable activities, with people…

1 min.
mh world

HEALTH QUESTION: When I snack, I get hungrier – how do I stop the cravings? The answer is snacking “proteins and healthy fats,” endocrinologist Dr. Belinda Lennerz tells us. “Your body digests both slowly, and neither triggers the kind of hunger-stoking insulin response you get from sugar or refined carbs.” Pro tip: stay away from sweet and salty flavours – a combo that fires up your brain’s ‘give me more’ sectors. Eat better: MH.CO.ZA/HEALTH SEX 160 The number of women we surveyed who revealed that, for women who highly value vaginal orgasms, a longer penis is preferred. Over a third (33.8%) claimed they were more likely to consistently have a vaginal orgasm when their partner’s penis was longer than average; however, 60% of the women said size makes no difference. See what else they…

2 min.
the exchange

FITNESS How hard should I be foam-rolling? It should hurt, right? Liam, Chatsworth First off, you don’t have to use a foam roller. It is a choice. For some, it may help with mobility or temporary pain relief, as the pressure enacts changes within tissues and the nervous system. But you should never use a foam roller for a bone issue. Pain here could just mean pain; or you could be irritating a fracture, and causing more problems. When foam rollers are used correctly you will experience discomfort. Still, there should be no ongoing pain or discolouration of the tissues after rolling. Self-applied pain is a personal choice, but more is not necessarily better. Some people tend to overdo or overvalue the ability to tolerate discomfort. But with rolling, too much pain can…

4 min.
the meaning of ageing

I was watching The Tonight Show with my friend Dave. One of Jimmy Fallon’s guests was British comedian Ricky Gervais. A fan asked him what the worst thing was about getting old. “I don’t know where to start,” replied Gervais. “I wake up in the morning now and go, ‘Oh God, I didn’t die.’ I’ve got a stiff back and stiff legs. I’m losing hair. It’s all bad,” he continued. And then Fallon asked him to pick just one thing. That was the wrong time for me to have taken a gulp of coffee. “Pendulous testicles,” Gervais replied sharply. Coffee sprayed out of my nose and tears rolled down my cheeks; but when I looked up, I saw that Dave was stony faced. He didn’t think it was funny. He doesn’t…

7 min.
fight to the finish

Alwyn Uys glided onto the pink Ironman 70.3 carpet, the arms that steered him through a 1.9km swim, 90.1km cycle and 21.1km run in front of him, lifting only to wipe away a tear. He heard the crowd cheering, felt their energy; and the loudest applause he’d ever heard washed over him like the waves of the Durban sea he’d swum in earlier. Crossing the half Ironman finish line had always been a dream of his. Now, against all odds, it had come true. BROKEN DREAMS Alwyn had spent his university years playing for a formidable Maties rugby team, but was benched after a persistent arm injury. Wrapped up in trying to find out who he was if he couldn’t be a rugby player, he turned to triathlon, with the Ironman start line…