ZINIO logo

Military Vehicles March/April 2021

Get the only magazine dedicated to the preservation, restoration, study, and use of historic military vehicles. Military Vehicles covers vintage military photos, collecting advice, market information, show listings, and extensive display and classified advertising sections offering to buy and sell hundreds of vehicles, parts, and accessories from dealers and enthusiasts all over the world. Other regular features include book and media reviews, letters to the editor, tech topics, weapons & replicas, models & toys, and internet sightings.

Read More
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Active Interest Media
Frequency:
Bimonthly
£4.35
£15.97
7 Issues

in this issue

6 min
news and views

FREE ISSUE OF MILITARY TRADER Do you like the accessories that go with your vehicle like uniforms, weapons, accouterments, helmets, or medals? If so, you will love Military Trader! Active Interest Media wants to give you a free digital copy of our sister magazine, Military Trader. To grab your copy, log onto www. Military-Trader.com. In the upper left of the page, you will see a box with FREE ISSUE written on it. Click that. You will see a screen to enter your email address to receive our free, weekly Militar-E-News. After you enter, the next screen will provide you the access for the free digital download — easy as that! 2021:YEAR OF MILITARY FORD Military Vehicles Magazine named 2021 the “Year of Military Ford” We invite you to share photos and stories of your…

milwehus210301_article_008_01_02
7 min
the jag file

“I BOUGHT AN ARMY JEEP. WHAT DO I HAVE?” “I bought this Jeep,” a recent e-mail began. “What do I have?” Attached were several photos that my friend had taken of his recent purchase. It appeared he was just beginning his research. And from the looks of the photos, I wasn’t going to be able to deliver the kind of news he was looking for. BOUGHT ON AN IMPULSE My buddy is who I would describe as a “casual car guy.” He grew up through the muscle car era, and, until recently, had the same El Camino for nearly 40 years. He had decided it was time to pass this “family heirloom” on to his adult son, who was delighted with his dad’s gift of the old Chevy. But now, my buddy was feeling…

5 min
communications

Military Vehicles Magazine welcomes correspondence from readers. Letters and e-mail must include a name and regular mail return address. Published letters reflect the opinions of the writers. Military Vehicles Magazine reserves the right to edit all letters for clarity, brevity, and other purposes. Address all correspondence to: Editor, Military Vehicles Magazine, 5225 Joerns Drive, Suite 2, Stevens Point, WI 54481, or e-mail to: jadams-graf@aimmedia.com. STEAMING TO VICTORY Great story in about the “Steaming to Victory” in the June 2020 issue. I am a big rail buff because my grandfather was a locomotive engineer for Jersey Central RR (Central RR of New Jersey) and only operated steam. They were one of the first railroads to get diesel, but it took awhile for them stop steam. My grandfather was retired by then. He operated only…

3 min
ford’s jeeps

In 2020, the Michigan Military Technical & Historical Society Museum in Eastpointe Michigan had a special exhibit on “The Jeeps of Ford.” Sadly, due to the pandemic, very few people were able to see it. Therefore, Military Vehicles Magazine is proud to be able to “bring the exhibit to you.” THE JEEPS OF FORD In 1940, the US Army posted a requirement for a new vehicle that met the following requirements: *36” maximum height *1000 Lbs. maximum weight *Ability to carry at least two men, one machine gun and 3000 rounds of ammunition *Four wheel drive, and cross country ability *Face armor for the driver *Amphibious ability desired but not required The Bantam Car Company of Butler Pennsylvania, delivered the first prototype on 23 September 1940; Willys-Overland delivered two vehicles on 11 November 1940 (a two-wheel steer and a…

milwehus210301_article_020_01_01
1 min
a study in production simplification

Willys Corporation’s first standard production jeeps had grilles that consisted of over 30 parts that had to be bent and fixture welded — a time consuming process. When the Ford Motor Company was contracted to assist in jeep production in early 1942, they made several changes to the jeep to simplify production and save valuable war materials. The most visible of these changes was to the grille. Ford designed a stamped steel grille that was made up of less than 10 major parts. This became the standard production grill for the bulk of the wartime production jeeps. Yes, the iconic jeep grille was actually a Ford design.…

milwehus210301_article_021_01_01
4 min
1942 ford gpw

I found this vehicle in 1984 on the lower east side of Santa Barbara, Calif. It was completely deteriorated. But what caught my attention were the three data plates on the glove box lid — originals made of brass. Upon further investigation I discovered the serial number on the frame which matched the data plate. I had to have this Jeep. It took some time, but I found the owner. He sold it to me on October 4, 1985, for $750 in cash. I towed it to my garage where it sat for the next 15 years unmolested. Finally, I decided to restore it. I did not want to do a frame-up restoration all by myself. Therefore, I contracted with a Southern California Military Vehicle Collector Club (SCMVCC) club member to restore just…

milwehus210301_article_032_01_01