ZINIO logo
EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Mountain Biking UK

Mountain Biking UK Mountain Biking Skills 2021

Add to favorites

Mountain Biking UK has got all the latest news, kit and exclusive info on the newest and best bikes. The MBUK Wrecking Crew testing team are out there right now, riding new bikes and products to destruction, to give you expert reviews you can count on to be brutally honest. We live to ride - and that's what makes MBUK Britain’s best-selling bike magazine.

Read More
Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Immediate Media Company London Limited
Frequency:
Monthly
SPECIAL: Get 40% OFF with code: JOY40
BUY ISSUE
£4.99
SUBSCRIBE
£39.99
13 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
welcome

In choosing this special edition you’ve taken the next pedal stroke (or perhaps uplift) on your journey to becoming a better mountain biker. Inside you’ll find everything you need to know to make the most of anything a trail is likely to throw at you. Crammed with step-by-step advice from top coaches and pro riders, this issue arms you with the best and most up to date MTB riding knowledge available. We’ve divided much of the mag into blue, red and black sections to help give the most relevant advice for the grade of trail you’re currently riding and to help take you to the next level. See you out on the trails! WARNING Many of the riding techniques featured in this publication are suitable for advanced cyclists only. Individuals carrying out any of…

2 min.
customise your bike

SADDLE HEIGHT If you are descending or practising skills, drop your saddle down as it will allow you to move your bodyweight around the bike. A dropper post makes this a lot easier of course. TYRES For all-year use go for an aggressive front tyre and a fast rolling rear with good braking traction. As a rule of thumb, start at a base setting of 26psi (less if tubeless). If you’re getting pinch punctures add 2psi at a time. Check your psi every time you ride. BRAKE POSITION In a standing position, put your hands on your grips and extend your index fingers out. Now adjust the angle, lever reach and clamp in or out, so you can cover your brakes comfortably and confidently with maximum leverage. PEDALS & SHOES If you want to improve your skills,…

1 min.
improve your balance

+ DRILLS TO BUILD SKILLS Open your hands in your attack position – you shouldn’t be pulling or pushing with your hands, just balanced on your feet.…

3 min.
tweak a bike to suit a female rider

TYRE PRESSURES Women are generally lighter than men and can get away with running softer tyre pressures for extra grip and (especially on a hardtail) comfort. How low you can go will depend on your weight, riding style, wheel size, tyre width and casing, whether your wheels are set up tubeless or with inner tubes, and the terrain you’re riding. As a rough guide, start at around 25psi and adjust downwards until you reach a pressure you’re happy with, where your tyres are able to conform around small trail obstacles but don’t squirm in corners and you’re not getting lots of pinch punctures SADDLE Saddle soreness may just be the most talked-about topic in women’s cycling, so fitting a decent female-specific seat is the first thing you should do if you opt for…

3 min.
bike park ready

SUSPENSION You want your bike to handle hard landings and bigger holes, but simply adding more air to your fork and/or shock means sacrificing traction. Volume spacers can help here. They make your suspension ramp up more towards the end of its travel, to resist bottoming out. If you’re going to ride a jumpy spot, check that your rebound isn’t so fast that you’ll get bucked on the take-offs. TYRES Changing tyres isn’t an essential, but fitting a chunkier set can give you more traction and reduce the risk of flats. Look for thicker or dual-ply casings. Adding a few psi of pressure can be a good idea for rocky trails and to stop your tyres squirming in high-speed berms. If you’re feeling flush, a second set of heavier-duty wheels with DH tyres…

3 min.
get the most from a day at the bike park

1 KNOW BEFORE YOU GO Most bike parks have uplift services, so make sure you book on to avoid disappointment, and that you know the park’s opening times. If there’s an online disclaimer form, it’s best to fill this in before you arrive which will save time when checking-in. Read the rules of the venue – you can find these on the park’s website. Make sure to check for any weather warnings, because in bad conditions the uplift may stop running or some trails may be closed. 2 BIKE AND KIT CHECK Make sure you have your bike in great working order. Brakes, bolts, tyres and suspension should be able to withstand a day (or a weekend) of thrashing without a second thought.” Remember to pack all your kit too. Helmets, shoes, pads, gloves,…