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net May 2019

Get net digital magazine subscription today for pages of tutorials covering topics such as CSS, PHP, Flash, JavaScript, HTML5 and web graphics written by many of the world’s most respected web designers and creative design agencies. Interviews, features and pro tips also offer advice on SEO, social media marketing, web hosting, the cloud, mobile development and apps, making it the essential guide for practical web design.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
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13 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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editor’s note

Compared to other creative industries, web design is a chimera. Neither one thing or the other, it sits halfway between mathematical, scientific rigour and intuitive, aesthetic creativity. That’s why I think one of the most important qualities a designer or developer can have is flexibility – having tools that adapt to the task at hand means you can tackle problems as they arise. This is what makes variable fonts such an exciting technology. Rather than having to package umpteen different fonts just to produce a formulaic site, they’re enabling designers to produce radical typographic sites – all while shipping less code. And if this has whet your appetite, Mandy Michael is on hand this issue to show how you can use variable fonts to maximise creativity and minimise code. But they aren’t…

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featured authors

MANDY MICHAEL Michael is a development manager and front-end developer with a passion for creative design. Bringing this to bear, on page 60 she reveals how variable fonts can produce lighter, more innovative sites. t: @mandy_kerr CONOR MCGANN McGann is a shopping and mobile specialist at Google and has worked with retail clients, digital agencies and startups. On page 68, he shows you how to bring together the awesome power of AMP and PWAs t: @instamcgann RICHARD MATTKA Mattka is an award-winning creative director, designer and developer. On page 76, he shares this expertise in his guide on creating custom 3D geometry in Three.js. w: richardmattka.com t: @synergyseeker FRANCESCA CUDA Cuda is technology director at ustwo and has held engineering roles for over 10 years. On page 88, she gets her maths on, showing you how to use vectors and matrices…

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exchange

THIS MONTH FEATURING… JON YABLONSKI Yablonski is a product designer who’s currently working on design systems at General Motors. He’s also director of digital experiences for AIGA Detroit. w: jonyablonski.com t: @JonYablonski AASHNI SHAH Based in Toronto, Shah is a CEO at Elixir Labs, a nonprofit that builds websites for other nonprofits. She’s also a software engineer at Square. w: www.aashni.me t: @aashnisshah QUESTION OF THE MONTH Any advice on running a hackathon? Falak Gonzalez, New Hampshire, US AS: Running a hackathon is exhilarating! You definitely need a lot of energy and very good project management. I found it best to mentally compartmentalise the different parts of the event going on, for example catering, sponsors, volunteers and venue This helped with focus and keeping things on track. I also assigned a lead to each of those roles, so that there was always…

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3 simple steps

How can I go about finding volunteer opportunities for my dev skills? Emeli Gordon, Nova Scotia, Canada AS: Finding volunteer developer positions is surprisingly hard! Here are some good places to start. Volunteer websites + Onlinevolunteering.org connects volunteers with projects around the world for a variety of roles; developer positions definitely exist. Other similar sites include VolunteerMatch, Do-it and Create The Good. Open-source projects + As a developer, open-source projects are a great way to contribute. FreeCodeCamp has a few projects on its website and GitHub is always a treasure trove of open-source projects you can contribute towards. Follow your passion + The best success often comes from working on something you’re passionate about. If there’s a nonprofit you’ve supported or whose cause you believe in, contact them. PS: we’re always looking for more volunteers at Elixir Labs!…

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cool stuff we learned this month

MARVEL’S ‘CAPTAIN MARVEL’ WEBSITE USES 1990S WEB DESIGN + The new Captain Marvel website features weird animations, rainbow fonts and enables fans to find information on the movie’s characters, where to buy tickets and play a nostalgic Captain Marvel computer game. https://netm.ag/2SERKsL RACC WEB DESIGN CONTEST TO UPDATE SITE + Reading Area Community College’s web application development program has hosted a presentation and awards event for its first web design challenge. Students were asked to use their computer coding skills to redesign the website for the Berks County Community Foundation’s Jump Start Incubator programme. https://netm.ag/2I8exsU CREATE EMOJI MASTERPIECES WITH THIS NIFTY WEB TOOL + The Emoji Mosaic app lets you feed it any image you like and it’ll instantly churn out an emojified version for you. It was put together by programmer and designer Eric Lewis and…

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from our timeline

How will 5G affect what you consider to be acceptable page size? It shouldn’t change anything, there are still going to be a lot of people who are on 4G or lower. It’s important to think about the accessibility of those who can’t or won’t be using 5G. At least at first, we’d like to think there’d be no change. @HeX_Productions In large swathes of the UK, it’s not uncommon to only have Edge or 3G *at best* when on a train. @schofeld 2G will still be key if you want to keep webpages accessible in rural areas. @m_lorek It won’t, until there are so few 3G phones that supporting them becomes unviable. @WebSurrey Bloat will continue apace, more people on slower networks will be cut off from those requiring a fast connection. Not a bad thing though: their…

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