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Official Tour de France GuideOfficial Tour de France Guide

Official Tour de France Guide

Official 2018 Tour de France Race Guide

Celebrate the build-up to the World’s biggest annual sporting event with the Official 2018 Race Guide. This year’s Official Guide comes packed with profiles of every team, stats for every rider, maps of every stage and lots more…

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Immediate Media Company London Limited
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IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
hotshots

Stage 2Düsseldorf – Liège 2 July 2017 Quick-Step’s Marcel Kittel wins the first of five stages and with it slips into the green jersey. The German powerhouse led the sprinter’s points classification into stage 16 before Sunweb’s Michael Matthews wrestled it from him and wore it all the way to Paris. Photographer: Simon GillStage 4Mondorf-les-Bains – Vittel 4 July 2017 FDJ’s Arnaud Démare (head down) holds off Alexander Kristoff (left) and Peter Sagan (centre) for his first-ever Tour stage victory. But the race-shaping action’s happening behind as a crash ends Mark Cavendish’s Tour. Sagan is subsequently disqualified. Photographer: Tim de WaeleStage 9Nantua – Chambery 9 July 2017 Highs...

access_time1 min.
the jerseys

Yellow Jersey The yellow jersey, or maillot jaune, is worn by the general classification leader – the rider who has taken the least cumulative time to complete the race after each stage. Time bonuses are available at each stage finish, which means the yellow jersey contenders will fight even harder for stage wins.Green Jersey The green jersey is worn by the leader of the points competition, usually a sprinter. The maillot vert rewards the race’s most consistent finisher based on points gained from intermediate sprints and end-of-stage placings. This year, points are weighted to favour sprint stage winners.White Jersey The white jersey is...

access_time4 min.
from nine to eight

If cycling was an individual sport, the decision to reduce the number of riders to eight per team wouldn’t have provoked any reaction. However, the Tour de France can’t be won by one rider alone, while in the same way each stage win is usually the reward for a certain degree of collective endeavour. Strategies are defined and applied, with a determined role for each one of the actors. These had become well defined when teams raced with nine riders. But now they will have one place fewer at the Tour. This constraint is unlikely to make life easier for managers...

access_time3 min.
prize money

France’s Warren Barguil will pocket €25,000 if he regains the polka-dot jerseyWhat’s at stake? In a peloton of 176 riders, there are a number of objectives, depending on the temperament, qualities and targets of each racer. The most collective of individual sports ensures that most of the riders have a tactical part to play in most of the stages. Some have their eyes set on one or more of the various jerseys, while others go all-out chasing stage wins over the course of the three weeks. Most hope that fortune will favour them if and when they manage to infiltrate a...

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tour talk

Team Sky’s Michal Kwiatkowski (centre) is a one-day classic winner but serves as a super domestique come the Tour Autobus _ The last pack of riders on mountain roads, usually comprising a mix of sprinters and domestiques. Baroudeur _ Translates as a ‘battler’ or ‘adventurer’, and describes those riders who spend a lot of time and energy trying to escape from the peloton. Bidon _ A plastic water bottle. Bonk or knock _ Both are bad news for cyclists. To ‘bonk’ or to ‘knock’ is when your body runs out of easy-to-access energy and you drop off the pace and sometimes out of the...

access_time3 min.
christian prudhomme

The 2018 Tour route’s in line with the structure employed for the race in the 1980s, with the mountains featuring much later than we’ve come to expect… I don’t like us to stick to identical formulae year after year. Last year, we had a finish at La Planche des Belles Filles on the fifth stage, which was early. I wanted to include the cobbles on the route after eight days of racing, as on previous occasions they featured earlier on. I’m curious to see what this will bring, especially as it comes before a big leap to the Alps. But doesn’t a...

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