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OUTOUT

OUT December/January 2018-19

Sexy, smart, and sophisticated, it inspires readers with captivating feature stories, striking fashion layouts, and lively entertainment reviews. Get OUT digital magazine subscription today to discover what's in. Each issue is filled with interviews, fashion, travel, celebrities and more for gay life today.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Here Media
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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generations

“Even within our community, teachability is our strongest weapon against ignorance.” THIS PAST JUNE, I read an article in The New York Times by Amanda Duarte. Near the end of the article, Duarte wrote, “The young are leading us, and I am not one bit mad about it.” The statement alluded to political topics, but Duarte’s piece wasn’t in the Times’s Politics section. It was a sharp and lively review of the season 10 finale of RuPaul’s Drag Race, and Duarte was talking about Aquaria, the season’s 22-year-old winner. Aquaria is included in this year’s Out100, and Duarte’s quote about youth stuck with me as I curated our portfolio, more than half of which is made up of honorees under age 35. Not only did Duarte’s piece signify how deeply queerness…

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contributors

MARTIN SCHOELLER Our annual Out100 portfolio can be a daunting task for even the most seasoned photographers. This year, we looked to Martin Schoeller to breathe life into our “Generations” theme, and his inventive portraiture didn’t disappoint. “It was inspiring and a great learning experience working with so many people from the LGBTQ community,” he says. “I heard so many personal stories about struggles, obstacles, and victories.” For some, shooting 100 subjects—in a cross-continental, two-month marathon—would cloud their memory, but Schoeller, whose iconic work has been featured in National Geographic, Time, GQ, and many other outlets, recalls so many highlights. “I tried to be playful, to experiment, and to capture each [subject’s] personality,” he says. “Jill Soloway was so full of optimism, Indya Moore didn’t want to leave and we shot for…

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feedback

Rickey Revelations Out’s November cover merged fashion, youth, the ever-growing power of social media, and a message celebrating the (long overdue) increased visibility of queer black men. Dressed head to toe in Dries van Noten, former Vine star and current Instagram sensation Rickey Thompson made the cover sing, and readers and followers were quick to sing its praises. “KING,” WROTE GRAMMY winner Sam Smith on Thompson’s personal Instagram page. The contemporary millennial lexicon was on full display (between balls of fire and heart-eyes emojis), aligning with Thompson’s verbiage. “SO NICE TO SEE a queer black man expressing himself in all different aspects and thriving,” wrote Instagram user @kewwss on Out’s post of Thompson’s cover. Sandra Gonzalez praised our selection, saying: “You did right by picking Rickey!!!! Amazing cover.” THROUGH THE ENDLESS exclamations of “Yass”…

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on the covers

Porter: Styling by Brandon Garr. Sweater by Louis Vuitton. Coat by Bottega Veneta. Glasses by Native Ken SOPHIE: Styling by Mindy Le Brock. Dress and necklace available at Pechuga Vintage Queer Eye: Styling by Katie Woolley and Aneila Wendt. Brown: Jacket by The Very Warm; shirt by Abercrombie & Fitch. Van Ness: Sweater by Alexander Wang. France: Suit by Thom Browne; sweater by Zara. Berk: Sweater by H&M. Porowski: Jacket by Balmain; T-shirt by Hanes x Karla González: Styling by Michael Cook. Shirt by 3.1 Phillip Lim…

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a vessel and a voice

IF LIFE CAN FEEL like steering a wayward ship through uncertain tides, then LP’s genre-spanning guitar music peels off the barnacles underneath. With even-keeled honesty and a singing voice as potent as aged bourbon, the rakish New York-born songwriter has created soaring indie-rock out of mental strife, the pain and pathos of relationships, and hot-blooded queer intimacy. The gospel-driven “Muddy Waters,” released in 2015, exemplified those sensibilities and amplified the heart-pounding claustrophobia of the climactic scene in season 4 of Orange Is the New Black, in which an inmate brandishes a gun at a corrections officer. “The past two years have been incredible on a professional level,” LP says, speaking in low, easygoing tones that bring to mind the drawl of a Woodstock rocker. “But just because things are going good…

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the agenda

1. Anna and the Apocalypse : Undead & Woke Two stars from this madcap musical weigh in on its resonant themes. Take one part Glee, two parts 28 Days Later, and add a dash of A Christmas Story, and you’ve got Anna and the Apocalypse. This Christmas horror musical teen comedy (say that five times fast) opens November 30—just in time for you to punch up your holiday soundtrack with a chorus of zombie-elves devouring brains. End times are both festive and tuneful in Little Haven, where teenage Anna (Ella Hunt) lives an unenthused life until the threat of apocalypse forces her to step up. Quickly, she becomes a candy cane–wielding warrior straight off the pages of a manga, fending off zombies and fighting to stay alive. “She presented an opportunity to play…

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