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Petersen's HuntingPetersen's Hunting

Petersen's Hunting

December/January 2019-20

Each issue of Petersen's Hunting Magazine has instructional and entertaining articles for the true hunting enthusiast! Get in-depth coverage of various hunting disciplines, information on the seasonal Hunting Hot Spots, equipment reviews, and much more!

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
KSE Sportsman Media, Inc.
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11 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
petersen’s hunting

PUBLISHER Kevin E. Steele EDITORIAL STAFF EDITOR David Draper ASSOCIATE EDITOR Joe Genzel ART DIRECTION Tim Neher STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Michael Anschuetz COPY EDITOR Mike Brecklin FIELD EDITORS EXECUTIVE FIELD EDITOR Craig Boddington WESTERN FIELD EDITOR Joseph von Benedikt CONTRIBUTORS David Hart, Mike Schoby, Keith Wood Jeff Johnston, John Hafner, Dusan Smetana Tom Martineau, Lee Thomas Kjos PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jenny Kaeb ENDEMIC AD SALES NATIONAL ENDEMIC SALES MANAGER Jim McConville (440) 791-7017 WESTERN REGION Hutch Looney hutch@hlooney.com EASTERN REGION Pat Bentzel (717) 659-8095 MIDWESTERN REGION / WHERE TO GO Mark Thiffault (720) 630-9863 NATIONAL AD SALES ACCOUNT DIRECTOR – DETROIT OFFICE Kevin Donley (248) 798-4458 NATIONAL ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE – CHICAGO OFFICE Carl Benson (312) 955-0496 DIRECT RESPONSE ADVERTISING/NON-ENDEMIC Anthony Smyth (914) 693-8700 PRESIDENT & CEO Jim Liberatore CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER, PUBLISHING & BRANDED MEDIA Mike Carney EVP, GROUP PUBLISHER & OPERATIONS Derek Sevcik VP, CONSUMER MARKETING Peter Watt VP, MANUFACTURING Deb Daniels DIRECTOR, MARKETING Kim Shay SENIOR DIRECTOR, PRODUCTION Connie Mendoza DIRECTOR, PUBLISHING TECHNOLOGY Kyle Morgan SENIOR CREATIVE DIRECTOR…

access_time2 min.
“out in the cold”

WHEN MY fingertips start to turn numb and my eyes water in the bracing wind, I take a deep breath in, slowly exhale, and repeat the mantra: “Cold is temporary.” No matter how far below freezing it is, I think, being cold is only a temporary condition. If it gets too unbearable, I can always call it a day and head for camp to warm up the extremities. I love winter weather. When the mercury falls south of freezing and an Arctic clipper pushes down on to the plains, I start figuring out ways to spend more time in the field. There was that one winter when I white-knuckled it for an hour through a raging blizzard to reach a slough that was frozen solid. I needed an axe to chop through the…

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cut the distance

KUDOS TO DAVID DRAPER FOR “AGAIN, HALF AS LONG” IN THE OCTOBER ISSUE. IT IS A CONCISE AND WELL-WRITTEN BIT OF ADVICE. I RECALL PASSING A 350-YARD SHOT AT A MULE DEER BUCK AND EVENTUALLY KILLING HIM AT 40 YARDS. THE EXCITEMENT OF THAT HOUR STALK IS STILL PALPABLE. THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 350 AND 40 IS A LOT MORE THAN JUST YARDAGE. THANK YOU. JEFF ARNOLD Via Email Mr. Arnold, I appreciate the kind words regarding my recent “Editor’s Letter.” It really came to mind for me a few weeks ago when I had a grizzly bear in my scope at 200 yards. Instead of taking him then, I cut the distance to just 74 yards. Talk about a thrill. I hope more hunters heed my advice this fall. Thanks for being a…

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the highs and lows of passing it on

Hilary is possibly the most unlikely hunter I could conjure up: a young suburban woman from Brooklyn, more comfortable with Instagram than with Remington. I honestly worried about which end of the shotgun she’d point toward the turkey. We found ourselves on the Clear Fork Ranch in Texas by a mix of accident and purpose. We worked together—she in the home office of another magazine, I as a field editor—and she had asked a couple times about my photos and stories of hunting. I blurted out, as a matter of habit and good manners, that she was welcome to come along on my next trip. Her response knocked me off balance. “OK,” she said. “I’d like to learn how to hunt.” That was the “accident.” The “purpose” was an invitation from my…

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bullet board

BULLET BASICS Federal’s Edge TLR utilizes construction rooted in the legendary Trophy Bonded Bear Claw to achieve best-in-class penetration coupled with massive expansion. The rear half is solid gilding metal (95 percent copper, 5 percent zinc), and the soft lead frontal core is bonded in place. A boattail, a hollow composite tip, and an ultra-sleek profile provide a very high ballistic coefficient. That hollow composite tip collapses inward on impact, enabling the Edge TLR to expand reliably and dramatically even at slow impact velocities—an outstanding choice for long-range hunting. The solid rear half with bonded-core front, means it never comes apart or fails to penetrate even when impacting at extreme velocities up close. TESTING GROUND I used the bullet to shoot a massive, old, 54-inch kudu bull in Namibia. As evening waned, it…

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cartridge corner

HISTORY A refinement of the long-necked .30-03 Springfield cartridge, the“Ought-Six”featured a shorter neck and a light, fast, 150-grain projectile. Introduced in 1906, it went on to become America’s favorite hunting cartridge. Its success was due to two things: the unprecedented ballistic performance it provided servicemen in the Great War and its profoundly versatile, authoritative performance on big game. Originally fielded in battle in the bolt-action Model 1903 Springfield, then in the legendary M1 Garand during WWII, the .30-06 earned a place in soldiers’ hearts. Upon returning home, they customized surplus battle rifles or commissioned custom bolt actions chambered in .30-06. The rest, as they say, was history. APPLICATION With lightweight .30-caliber projectiles in the 150-grain range, the .30-06 is superb for deer-size game. For elk and moose, pick a heavier, 165- to 200-grain controlled-expansion bullet,…

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