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Professional PhotographyProfessional Photography

Professional Photography August 2016

Each issue celebrates world-leading professionals and their images through in-depth interviews and extensive photographic portfolios. With 4 issues in a 1 year subscription, you can enjoy inspirational galleries from established and emerging names in photography – as well as keeping up with news and reviews of the latest pro kit, exhibitions and books.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
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IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
letter from the editor

Who doesn’t love the digital era? But while I love the instant visual information that can be found from all over the world at the click of a button, it simply can’t compare to when a photograph can be seen beautifully printed, larger than life on a gallery wall. Our first port of call, when we’re planning the content for these pages, are upcoming exhibitions, followed by book releases and other key events that will bring photographers into the limelight. And this month, I am jubilant: Eggleston at the National Portrait Gallery on page 36, Helmut Newton at FOAM in Amsterdam on page 102, Alex Webb was at Photo London (with a book to follow), Henri Cartier Bresson in Norwich on page 84 (no, we aren’t all capital-centric). The opportunities to see…

access_time2 min.
this month’s featured pros

MICHAEL FREEMAN PAGE 10 Ahead of his appearance at Liverpool’s Digital Splash, Freeman reveals the story behind an action-filled, tense image captured in Colombia. KIRK WEDDLE PAGE 12 On the 25th anniversary of Nirvana’s album Nevermind, the photographer behind its unusual and iconic cover image reveals how it was taken. SARAH SHELDRAKE PAGE 44 The 44-year-old mum of four reveals how raising a child with Down’s syndrome gave her the inspiration to realise her potential as a photographer. PHILLIP PRODGER PAGE 36 Revelations of the NPG’s head of photographs, Phil Prodger, who’s worked closely with William Eggleston in the run-up to his major London show. KATE HOPEWELL-SMITH PAGE 74 The wedding, lifestyle and portrait photographer explains how her new garden studio has given her a better work/life balance. ALEX WEBB PAGE 16 Magnum photographer Alex Webb is known for his colourful street scenes, but he reveals that…

access_time4 min.
ditching your camera is just plain dumb

I self-flagellated for being an idiot and not bringing at least one body and a couple of lenses. It’s Monday and I am just coming to, having just spent four days on the lash. And I have made a major discovery in my photographic career – you can’t take a picture without a camera. (You never stop learning, it appears.) When will I ever learn? It’s true what they say, as we head towards a pensionable age: life turns full circle and we behave like teenagers once more. Last Thursday morning, I jumped on a train to meet up with buddies for the Le Mans’ 24-hour race, and I have been barely conscious since. I spent a fretful few days beforehand pondering what to pack; sleeping bags, a change of socks, aspirin……

access_time1 min.
story _ behind _ michael _ freeman

“ What are they both thinking? Probably some fundamental regret on the part of the man. ” Michael Freeman I’ve always been drawn to in-between moments, but it took me years to realise. You wait, you look, you try your best to anticipate, and at some point you have to commit. Leave your finger on the release, shoot hundreds and choose later? That’s not photography. This was a very specific cultural occasion. The north coast of Colombia, the town of San Juan Nepomuceno. January, the coolest and most pleasant time of year, is for fiestas and celebrations, including this corraleja. A temporary, large stockade is erected for a few days with multi-tiered stands for spectators, and young bulls are invited to wreak havoc on their more foolish human equivalents. Alcohol and testosterone…

access_time4 min.
million dollar baby

When Kirk Weddle was asked to photograph a baby underwater for an album cover in 1991, the commission was unusual but not particularly remarkable. It was a low-budget shoot and the name of the band meant nothing to him. “I’d shot a lot of band pictures before, and nobody I’d photographed ever went anywhere,” he says. “So I wasn’t expecting much out of these guys.” I completely walked away from it for a while, but now I embrace it. Over the years, I’ve gotten all kinds of different reactions. THE band was Nirvana and the album was Nevermind. It went on to sell more than 24 million copies, while its cover has become one of the most iconic in rock history. At the time, Weddle was 29 and at the beginning of a…

access_time9 min.
webb of colour

The grey Georgian symmetry of Somerset House in London is not the usual habitat of Magnum maestro and street photographer Alex Webb, but the surroundings are not entirely unfamiliar either. Just over three years ago, he was one of those featured in a group show here entitled ‘Cartier-Bresson: A Question Of Colour’, curated by William A. Ewing, formerly of New York’s International Center of Photography. Recalling that exhibition, Alex says, “The thesis was that Cartier-Bresson hated colour, and yet these photographers who work in colour were clearly influenced in some way by Cartier-Bresson.” He leans back in his chair to examine some of the prints that surround us: “Some of these pictures were in that exhibition,” he notes. IT’S THE first day of Photo London 2016 and we’re sitting in the…

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