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Professional PhotographyProfessional Photography

Professional Photography November 2016

Each issue celebrates world-leading professionals and their images through in-depth interviews and extensive photographic portfolios. With 4 issues in a 1 year subscription, you can enjoy inspirational galleries from established and emerging names in photography – as well as keeping up with news and reviews of the latest pro kit, exhibitions and books.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
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IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
letter from the editor

It ’s been an exceptionally busy few weeks, but as we sent this issue to press I sighed with relief. Not just because we’d hit our deadline, but because it’s lived up to my expectations. The relief was fleeting; it was immediately replaced with a nervous fear for how it will be received. Because while we’ve gone up in pages and produced a magazine that’s more entertaining, informative and, I hope, more inspiring than before, we’ve also gone up in price. It feels like a big jump, but to survive in this new format, that’s the trade-off. And in exchange, we will continue to produce a magazine that gives you more of what you love. We’ve always sought to find the biggest names in photography, but now we will go deeper with our…

access_time2 min.
this month’s featured pros

ELLIOTT ERWITT PAGE 16 One of the grand old men of Magnum, photographer Elliott Erwitt talks to us about Cartier-Bresson, bicycle horns and why he avoids cropping. PETER LINDBERGH PAGE 40 Lindbergh’s discusses his iconic and timeless black-and-white imagery, a lasting vision to challenge representations of women in fashion. CHRISTOPHER BETHELL PAGE 72 Intrigued by a grandfather from America he’d never met, this rising star headed to the States to discover his roots. BEN BRAIN PAGE 88 The editor of Digital Camera magazine reviews five of the latest photography books, including The Last Stand: Northern Europe by Marc Wilson. KEVIN MULLINS PAGE 100 The award-winning wedding photographer joins our round table discussion about how photographers should go about setting their rates. SANDRA JORDAN PAGE 34 London-based travel photographer Sandra Jordan explains how she turns inner-city high-rise blocks into images of artistry and pulchritude. SPENCER MURPHY PAGE 50 In a world…

access_time3 min.
can you ever flip an image?

Perhaps I should be more careful: maybe flipping is never a good idea. The other day, a fellow picture editor asked whether the designer I work with ever flips images. I was a bit taken aback. Of course he doesn’t! But the truth is, sometimes he does. It’s just that in those instances I’m happy for him to do it. I’m talking about stock pictures of inert objects, a teacup for example, where the handle would work better with the layout if it was on the other side. We usually have a short discussion and I shrug my shoulders and say, “Do whatever you like, it’s only a teacup.” But if the picture was of a person, a place, or even a handmade teacup then a different set of rules would apply. You…

access_time2 min.
story _ behind _ peter _ gravelle

THIS IS an outtake from a shoot I did with The Damned in 1976. Some of the pictures from this shoot featured on the cover and poster for Damned Damned Damned, which was the first LP to be released by a British punk band. “With no whipped cream available, we ended up using shaving foam sting mentholated . Oh, does that the eyes! ”Peter Gravelle Photographers are always being asked favours. This particular favour was to photograph a band I knew nothing about. I agreed, partly because I’d been told I could do whatever I wanted to. I thought this only fair as I was to pick up the costs. The idea was a pie in the face. How I came up with this I’m not too sure, but I was probably looking…

access_time5 min.
“everything about his body language just reeked of capote”

Richard Corman is responsible for photographing some of the world’s most recognisable faces of the last 30 years, including Nelson Mandela, Bill Clinton, Robert De Niro, Meryl Streep, Michael Jordan, Ralph Lauren, Muhammad Ali, Kurt Vonnegut and Madonna. In 2005, he created what is perhaps one of his most celebrated and seminal images to date; a shot of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, in character as the novelist, screenwriter, playwright and actor Truman Capote. The director came to me because they knew I had apprenticed Avedon. He wanted me to do something that was really reminiscent of that time. Corman’s picture of Hoffman was commissioned for the poster for multi-award winning biopic Capote, and was shot in the style of his mentor Richard Avedon, who had photographed the real Truman Capote during the…

access_time10 min.
the enviable eloquence of elliott erwitt

ERWITT is now 88 and one of the grand old men of the Magnum agency, having been initially invited to join by co-founder Robert Capa in 1951. He’s had a prolific career as an advertising and editorial photographer, but is particularly celebrated for his personal pictures. They range from touching and sensitive images of family life to witty, wryly humorous photographs highlighting life’s ironies and absurdities. In recent years he has created a self-important alter ego, André S. Solidor (initials A.S.S.). The body of work produced in his name ridicules what Erwitt sees as the pretentiousness of much contemporary ‘art’ photography. As the new book makes clear, the roots of his peripatetic life were laid down in a childhood full of relocations and upheavals. He was born in Paris to Russian Jewish…

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