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N-Photo: the Nikon magazineN-Photo: the Nikon magazine

N-Photo: the Nikon magazine November 2016

Every month we bring you 132-pages of step-by-step advice on how to get the best results from your Nikon digital SLR. Our camera skills section will show you how to shoot great pictures and how to edit them to make them even better! You'll be inspired by the beautiful images shot by top photographers and fellow readers. And you'll learn the basics through our Nikopedia reference pages – picking up tips from the pros with our exclusive interviews and masterclasses. ****Note: This digital edition is not printable and does not include the covermount items or supplements you would find with printed copies***

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
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13 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
welcome to issue 65

Autumn is a special time for the outdoor photographer. The ever-shortening hours of daylight mean that you want to make the most of your weekends before winter really sets in. And the glorious colours of fall, that start to get at their best from late October in my neck of the woods, act as a reminder to head out in search of colourful foliage. We are all creatures of habit, and therefore it’s very easy for us to end up taking the same set of shots whenever we use our Nikons. I have an obsession for shooting markets, for instance, and it is hard to break from taking similar pictures of stalls wherever I travel in the world. So how do you get yourself trying new subjects, and approach the season…

access_time1 min.
contributors

NPhoto This issue’s special contributors... Heather Angel PAGE 52 Wildlife specialist Heather helps our Apprentice to polish her macro photography skills by capturing some colourful autumnal close-ups Marcus Hawkins PAGE 16 Regular N-Photo contributor Marcus joins our editor-in-chief in leaving his comfort zone to shoot whatever’s on the cards in our ultimate scavenger hunt. David Tipling PAGE 91 Former auditor David reflects on the big cat he met 30 years ago, on his first big trip abroad, and how it helped to change his life forever. Britta Jaschinski PAGE 92 Britta’s strong sense of purpose and respect for all life shines through in her work, as she documents staggering animal rights abuses across the globe. Matt Crockett PAGE 100 Matt dared to use composite techniques to get up close to the action of The Lion King in a departure from theatre photography norms. Joe McNally PAGE 130 Joe…

access_time1 min.
the n-photo team on... wildlife

Paul Grogan Editor It can be easy to think of wildlife photography as an exotic pastime for foreign trips, but the animals at home are fascinating too. paul.grogan@futurenet.com Jason Parnell-Brookes Staff Writer Wildlife parks are fantastic sources of subjects. I love watching the lions, and they move slowly enough to let you zoom in close. jason.parnell-brookes@futurenet.com Ben Andrews Lab Manager My favourite wildlife shots are the ones taken in a moment of eye contact, making you wonder what the animal is thinking. ben.andrews@futurenet.com Rod Lawton Head of Testing This time of year is perfect for shooting crisp, clear landscapes, made even better by a herd of deer wandering into shot. rod.lawton@futurenet.com Our regular contributors George Cairns, Geoff Harris, Michael Freeman, Marcus Hawkins, James Paterson, Matthew Richards, Keith Wilson, Joe McNally Special thanks to… Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition…

access_time3 min.
lightbox

Nikon images shortlisted for this year’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year Nosy Neighbour Sam Hobson, UK Sam wanted to capture the inquisitive nature of the urban red fox in a way that would pique the curiosity of its human neighbours. He spent weeks scouting for the ideal location in Bristol, the UK’s famous fox city. He discovered a wall that one curious fox cub liked to peek over and sit on in the early evening. Setting his focus very close to the lens, Sam stood back and waited. He was rewarded when the youngster peeked over and stayed motionless for long enough to create this intimate portrait. Nikon D800, Nikon 17–35mm f/2.8, 1/6 sec, f/4.5, ISO800 Blast Furnace Alexandre Hec, France When the golden lava flow from Kilauea on Hawaii’s Big Island periodically enters the ocean, the…

access_time15 min.
the great n photo scavencer hunt!

PHOTOGRAPHER 1 CHRIS GEORGE Editor-in-chief Chris packed his full-frame Nikon D800 for this challenge, along with a h eavy bag full of dif ferent lenses. He also too k up the driving duties on this scavenger hunt. PHOTOGRAPHER 2 MARCUS HAWKINS Regular N-Photo contributor Marcus opted for the D500 as his weapon of choice for the trip. He was in charg e of navigation, which is probably why we got l o s t so many times! S cavenger hunts are a great way of developing your photographic skills. The restrictions they place on you, in terms of time, technique and subject matter, force you to think creatively, and improve your camera dexterity too. We opted to take a grand tour of the Costwolds, a beautiful region that has a diverse range of subjects…

access_time3 min.
focus on the familiar

The mission To photograph familiar park animals Time One hour Skill level Beginner Intermediate Advanced Kit needed Nikon D-SLR Telephoto lens Bean bag (optional) Most people in the world have access to some kind of animal, whether domestic or wild. And many places around the world have some type of squirrel, or squirrel-type animal (such as a chipmunk). Almost everyone we know has, at some point, taken their Nikon to the local park and snapped some shots of a squirrel, but very few of the photos look like anything more than snaps. We’re going to show you how to take better pictures of creatures you might otherwise overlook. “We’re going to show you how to take better pictures of creatures you might overlook Getting started is simple: just wander down to your nearest park or woods, Nikon fitted with telephoto lens in hand. After…

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