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Photoshop CreativePhotoshop Creative

Photoshop Creative No. 140

Photoshop® Creative is the perfect magazine for learning more about Adobe’s outstanding application. Each issue is packed with inspirational tutorials covering the whole scope of the software, from creative projects, to practical guides to using tools and techniques. Whatever you use Photoshop for, Photoshop creative will help you become a better digital artist. Please note: Digital versions of the magazines do not include the covermount items or supplements that you would find on printed editions.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
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IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
welcome

sarah.bankes@imagine-publishing.co.ukPainting in Photoshop can be daunting, especially if you’ve never painted in the real world.However, it’s not as tricky as you might think, as this issue’s main feature will demonstrate. Just as traditional artists use photos as references, that’s exactly what we’re going to do in Photoshop. The great thing about digital painting is that you can even use the photo in the artwork itself by painting over it. You’ll be amazed at what you can achieve with a few of Photoshop’s brushes, so turn to p.16 and see for yourself. If manipulating photos is more your style, you’ll also learn how to add realistic light and shadows to surreal compositions; turn any portrait photo into a mechanical robot; and even create text effects using photos of everyday objects. There…

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trending images

There’s nothing more inspiring than surfing the internet and seeing what other artists are creating, and we encourage you to do so. Here are some of our favourite pictures that caught our attention recently, from some of the world’s most exciting artists and designers. This image has been viewed thousands of times online and is just one of a collection of imaginative pictures Alexander has made. Water can be difficult to digitally paint, but this is a superb example.Alexander Zienkowww.artstation.com/artist/alexanderzienkoThis is one of my first personal, non-commercial paintings, which was created using Adobe Photoshop CS3 and sketch brushes, which I collected from the internet. I used a Wacom Intuos 5 tablet and made the image on an old laptop. Double exposures are hugely popular in photography, and Photoshop enables artists…

access_time2 min.
readers’ images

Deka Marquesphotoshopcreative.co.uk/user/DekaMarquesImage of the issue I worked on the lighting in detail and tried to give sensitivity to the scene with shadows and mists. Plug-ins were used to soften lines and give a sense of illustration. Blue and orange were used to harmonise the scene. Deividas Nadeikaphotoshopcreative.co.uk/user/dnjimageI was doing a personal photo shoot for a girl and decided to express her feelings in a creative way. There were three pictures used: the girl, the lake and the sky. I enhanced everything with colour corrections and added the reflection. Théo Déwww.photoshopcreative.co.uk/user/theoWhen I saw this character, I had this impression that it was flying. So, I decided to create a soothing and dream-like world around it. To create something light, I used light flares and the Motion Blur tool. FelipeSiqueiraphotoshopcreative.co.uk/user/Felipebr.siqThis photomanipulation was…

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readers’ challenge

entries ChallengeThe best entries and overall challenge winner 1 Helena BurströI used all of the four images provided. I made three different brushes from the image of fireworks. I made the hula-hooping girl a dark silhouette and scaled her a little bigger. I used different Gradient Fill layers and blend modes. 2 Iona AlvarezFun Day on Top of the WorldI created this image with all of the four images and an additional image of a bridge taken from stock. I used a combination of techniques including masks, blending modes, brushes and the Dodge and Burn tools. 3 Moreno MatkovicWhales and BalloonsThis was a difficult challenge with tricky stock images but I managed to create something in the end! The monochrome image formed the basis for this image and the balloons…

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studioastic

Like many of the best design studios, the idea for studioastic came up when its founders were still at university. In this case, it was 10 years ago at the University of Applied Sciences in Salzburg. As David Oerter and Daniel Übleis explain: “We started as a collective of six classmates working on small client projects and playing around with personal ideas. After graduation Daniel started to work as a freelancer and David was employed at a film production company in Salzburg. The others moved to different cities but David and Daniel kept working together as David had one day a week off for freelance projects.” In 2011, the workload of their freelance projects reached a point where they had to either turn work down or jump in with both…

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a day in the life of matthias de cillia

No place like home: The fact that studioastic’s space is a converted flat gives it a home-away-from-home feel, and they regularly invite fellow creatives inHug in a mug 08:30“Getting my first cup of coffee, checking my emails and getting my daily dose of inspiration (Pinterest, Behance, ¼) are crucial. Furthermore I start my ‘Get stuff done today’ list.”Jour Fixe 09:30“We update each other about the projects we’re working on, schedule the day and assign tasks to team members. Yesterday’s problems get solved together with fresh input from the others. Time for a second cup of coffee.”Knuckling down 09:30“Then it’s time to get to work and get some stuff done. Today this is designing new assets in Photoshop and Illustrator for animating later in After Effects.”Lunch break 12:00“Usually we have lunch…

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