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EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Sporting Gun

Sporting Gun July 2021

Sporting Gun is the leading monthly magazine for clay, game and rough shooters. With editorial offices in the Lincolnshire countryside, it can justifiably claim to be at the heart of the shooting community. Monthly features range from gundog training to pigeon shooting, game shooting to wildfowling – along with sound, practical, advice on equipment and techniques to help the beginner, intermediate or experienced shot get more enjoyment from their sport. Sporting Gun is a must for anyone who invests time in and money on their shooting.

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Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Future Publishing Ltd
Frequency:
Monthly
£4
£31.99
12 Issues

in this issue

4 min
the european rabbit oryctolagus cuniculus

Our wild rabbit was introduced to this country and it is commonly accepted that the Normans were responsible. It is thought that they brought them across the Channel as a source of food and fur following the events of 1066. A lack of archaeological proof predating the 11th century backed this up, and the rabbit is not even mentioned in the Domesday Book. However, matters are not clear-cut and a 2005 archaeological dig at Lynford, Norfolk, produced the butchered remains of a rabbit alongside fragments of pots dating from the first or second century AD, proof that the Romans had brought some to these shores. Origins “The rabbit has always been a symbol of fertility and rebirth” The rabbit originated in south-western Europe. At one point the proper name for an adult was…

4 min
in the field

Spartan Javelin Lite bipod Some hunters thought the original Spartan bipod was too expensive. The Spartan team has reacted by introducing a new version, the Javelin Lite bipod. At £129 it has a much more competitive price tag for a bipod. The lower price means slightly less carbon fibre compared with other models (but it still only weighs 130g), and the legs aren’t adjustable. The Javelin Lite comes in three sizes – mini, standard or long. The mini provides 5.1in of ground clearance, while the long provides 7.5in. So, for the same price as a Harris bipod you lose the ability to adjust the height of the legs, but you do save 238g. Adapter Spartan bipods attach to your rifle using its patented system: a small adapter that permanently attaches to your rifle using…

6 min
breda zenith sporter

Breda is well known for producing semi-auto shotguns and, as with many Italian brands, they are produced in the Val Trompia region in Brescia. Breda uses first-class materials, displays impeccable workmanship and has state-of-the-art assembly for its shotgun lines. Its over-and-under line-up contains the Zenith Black, and Zenith Nickel, as well as the Zenith L game series, which uses Grade 3-4 wood and has some stunning engraving on the action, signed by master engraver Dario Cortini. The Zenith Black I tested here in 12-bore with 30in barrels has extended ‘Maxi’ multichokes. It has a decent stock with straight grain, which may not look pretty but ensures strength of the wood. The walnut is a nice, dark colour, with the grain matching the fore-end. The grade of wood is 3-4, and oiled…

8 min
in the round

Matt Hance, 52, has been involved in shooting sports for more than 40 years. He competes on the national and international circuit and has been a member of Team GB for the past three decades. His main shooting discipline is FITASC Sporting and he has won the British Grand Prix, English Open and UK FITASC Championship during his career. He spends a lot of his time coaching and working on the mental side of the game – building style, techniques and confidence with those he works with, which he says is ‘almost’ as rewarding as his own successes. I spoke to him recently to get an insight into his career and his approach to shooting. How long have you been shooting? From when I could first carry a gun. I come from…

1 min
overhead clays

I’m having trouble with clays that come from behind overhead. Have you any tips? Tony says: With an overhead target you can be looking up into the sky with no reference point, so we often see inconsistent hold points that cause inconsistent line issues. There is no magic fix for this but rather an awareness to pay attention to where the gun is held. We often see shooters standing normally waiting for the target to come to them, by which time it could be dropping rather quickly and getting further away. Tilting your head back to get a better visual pick-up point could help you engage with the target sooner and at a more optimum time. This can sometimes be achieved by turning your head to see it coming. The other…

1 min
first day on the grouse moor

I have been shooting pheasants and partridges for a few years but I have been invited on a grouse shoot this season for the first time. What can I do to prepare? Tony says: I would recommend going to a shooting school with a good selection of grouse targets and having a session with a coach who has experience of grouse shooting before your day on the moor. The grouse will be flying low and fast and as the birds approach your butt you should be taking them well out in front. This will feel odd at first but with a bit of practice you should get the hang of it. When shooting grouse, it is acceptable to shoot out of the back of your butt. The pickers-up will be well…