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The Big IssueThe Big Issue

The Big Issue 24-06-19

The Big Issue is a UK-based street paper that supports the homeless, the vulnerably housed and those seeking to escape poverty. Vendors normally buy the magazine for £1.25 and sell to the public for £2.50. We are using Zinio digital editions to create additonal revenue opportunities to fund our street-based and pastoral care services for our vendors. We are a social enterprise company and all revenues go to support the vulnerable communities we serve. Our goal is to move our vendors away from dependency and towards full time employment

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dennis Publishing UK
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51 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time3 min.
the big list.

01 Book now for a Linda McCartney photo retrospective Whether making music or veggie ready-meals, Paul McCartney’s late wife was multi-talented – but photography was her frst passion. This exhibition curated by Macca and daughters Mary and Stella will give a revealing view of Linda’s life through a lens, from The Beatles to muddy fun on the family’s Kintyre farm. Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum Glasgow, July 5, 2019-January 12, 2020; glasgowlife.org.uk/event/1/ linda-mccartney-retrospective 02 See the patriarchy get suplexed at Wrestle Queendom II Riot Grrrls of Wrestling is a grassroots all-women company set up by Emily Read, a bipolar mother of two on a mission to make this manliest of sports accessible to all. The sequel to Europe’s biggest ever women’s pro-wrestling event promises an empowering evening of death-defying dives and jaw-dropping smack-downs. York Hall,…

access_time3 min.
platform.

Big Issue in shock after violent death of vendor Big Issue stalwart and much-loved vendor Paul Kelly was killed last week. The ever-popular Kelly, 50, was attacked on June 15. Emergency services were called to his home in the Knightswood area of Glasgow but he died at the scene. Paul, known for his catchphrase, ‘Don’t be shy, give it a try’, sold the magazine in Glasgow city centre and in nearby East Kilbride. “We’re devastated. Paul was such a part of The Big Issue and of Glasgow city centre,” said The Big Issue editor Paul McNamee. “It’s an incredible shock that will take some time to come to terms with.” Rhys Corley-Morgan, sales and operations manager for The Big Issue in Scotland, said Paul Kelly was “a kind-hearted person”, adding that “the thoughts of everyone…

access_time3 min.
tributes to paul kelly

@bigissue Jackieinspiring People Make Glasgow - and he was one of them, RIP Paul, too tragic. 8jlogan Paul was a gent – always chatting and always with a smile. Was nice to see he hadn’t completely left East Kilbride and was always lovely to see him. He will be missed and I know many will feel the same. Fu2ramusic Absolutely gutted, come rain or shine he was always there outside the Sainsbury’s on Buchanan Street when I was walking to university. He always brightened up your day with his famous catchphrase. Buchanan Street will feel emptier now without Paul around. mritgreenock He was also very popular in EK where he opened the door for everyone at M&S. Very sad news. R10Sue Aww, he was such a lovely guy. Talked to me when I was having a panic attack once. He…

access_time3 min.
in memory of our friend

Idon’t remember the very last thing Paul Kelly said to me. You never do, not unless you know there is a reason to commit it to memory. We’d talked, as we did most days, about something or other, just putting the world to rights. It may have been about the magazine. Paul was a very useful critic, and barometer, of the magazine and how it was selling. If he was doing well, I knew the chances were it was performing well across the country. If he was struggling, or in Paul’s word if things were “shite”, then I knew others would find it hard too. Paul did not stand on ceremony. In recent weeks, he’d been talking about his father. He was on his mind. His dad had died last year and it…

access_time3 min.
news.

Is this how to make one Hull of a difference? Homelessness charity Crisis launched its campaign to scrap the 1824 Vagrancy Act last week calling for rough sleepers to be arrested only for criminal and anti-social behaviour – and not who they are. Hull City Council has its own colourful methods of countering anti-social behaviour – they asked more than 100 artists to spruce up 22 empty homes in the Preston Road area of the East Yorkshire city. Their street art, put together by organisers Bankside Gallery, had a marked impact on arson rates and boosted pride in the community, with nearby Marfleet reporting a 41 per cent reduction in anti-social behaviour as a result of the annual artwork. Minister feels heat as London rough sleeping soars Wheeler slammed for calling street homeless ‘tinkers’ Homelessness minister…

access_time3 min.
is fish and chips under threat because of climate change?

HOW IT WAS TOLD While Sir David Attenborough’s Blue Planet II documentary centred all of our thoughts on the sustainability of our oceans and the future of the earth, fish and chips has remained one of the UK’s most popular dishes. But if you’re hooked on the Friday-night staple, a widely reported story on June 16 will have left you reeling – it looks like the future won’t be going swimmingly for fish and chips. Reports suggested that the fast food favourite could be off the menu, with the most popular fish used in the dish – cod and haddock – falling to climate change in the next 30 years. So let the doom-mongering headlines commence. The Sun opted for “FISH HAS ITS CHIPS Fish and chips could be off the menu by 2050…

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