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EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
 / Cars & Motorcycles
The Classic MotorCycle

The Classic MotorCycle

January 2020

Started in 1903, The Classic MotorCycle has more to offer the true vintage motorcycle enthusiast than any other publication, backed by Europe's largest motorcycle image archive.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Mortons Media Group, Ltd
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

2 min.
editor’s welcome

The other evening I was rewatching the BBC’s excellent comedy series ‘Detectorists,’ about a group of metal detectorists (never detectors, that’s what they use!) and within the show they talked about the nature of hobbyists and collectors, and the manner in which people become ‘collectors.’ And more to the point, why do they adopt the hobbies that they do? Sometimes the only thing people have in common can quite often be an interest the same thing, whether that be classic motorcycles or metal detectors. But then that’s when our hobbies diversify, in that we split into what is, frankly, a staggering amount of sub-sections. People are divided by marque in the form of owners’ clubs, or by era perhaps, or by whatever their particular favourite branch of motorcycling may be – so,…

4 min.
rod coleman (1926-2019)

New Zealander Roderick (Rod) William Coleman, who died on August 8, 2019, started racing as a teenager. In 1949 his father Percy, who was a racing star in the family’s native country as well as a motorcycle trader, helped his son secure passage to Europe, the goal being that the young man would set the road racing world alight on his Isle of Man TT debut. Unfortunately, it didn’t quite go like that initially, as Rod crashed his AJS 7R in practice and broke his jaw, which was set – wrongly. But young Coleman knew it wasn’t right; he’d gone to medical school in 1946 but after a couple of years quit having decided it wasn’t what he wanted to do. Still, his medical training paid off, as he reset his…

8 min.
news & events

NMM raffle winner Bristol celebrates its 40th To be held over the weekend of February 1/2, the 2020 Carole Nash Bristol Classic MotorCycle show will be the 40th such event. To mark this milestone, organisers are turning the clocks back to the 1970s and 80s with a special themed birthday celebration. Visitors, traders and club members alike are encouraged to enter into the spirit of the celebration. There’s a prize of £100 per day for the best dressed visitor, and a £1000 cash prize for the best club stand. The first 1000 people who purchase tickets in advance will be given one free party bag per transaction, complete with an assortment of products and offers. Discounted advance tickets are now on sale, with a one-day adult pass costing £11. Tickets will also be available on the…

2 min.
book review

Author: Hughie Hancox Foreword by: Hughie Hancox New soft-back edition in the Veloce Classic Reprint Series. Published by: Veloce Publishing Ltd., Veloce House, Parkway Farm Business Park, Middle Farm Way, Poundbury, Dorchester, Dorset DT1 3AR Tel: 01305 260068 Email: sales@veloce.co.uk Fax: 01305 250479 Soft-back, 207 x 250mm (portrait); 160 pages with 183 photographs and illustrations. ISBN 978-1-845844-41-7/UPC 6-36847-04441-1 £25 (UK); $39.95 (USA); $52 (Canada) With a father who was a keen motorcyclist and long-time friend of Jack Wickes, the brilliant draughtsman and later Edward Turner’s right-hand man, it was no surprise to learn that the late Hughie Hancox was a lifelong Triumph enthusiast. Starting work at the Meriden factory in 1953, he worked as a fitter until his call up for national service. He eventually graduated to the famous Royal Corps of Signals Motorcycle Display Team (the…

2 min.
the way we were in january

1920 Scooter development was gathering momentum, as Kenilworth and Marseel both confirmed production models were imminent. In the summer of 1919, Capt Smith Clarke of Kenilworth had unveiled a 142cc ohv single cylinder machine he had been developing. Now Booth brothers of Coventry was entering production with it immediately, while, across the city, the Marseel Engineering Co. of Victoria Park had unveiled its prototype 232cc single cylinder two-stroke scooter. With its engine fitted horizontally under the rider’s footboards, the makers were offering the machine for £33. 1945 Racing fans eagerly awaited the recently published report of the AGM of Brooklands (Weybridge) Ltd. to see if there was any prospect of racing resuming at the famous banked track. When questioned about returning speed events to the venue, company chairman Mr C W Hayward was…

6 min.
readers’ letters

The Italian job With reference to the article in The Classic MotorCycle, December 2019, on the Moto Guzzi Nuovo Falcone, I would like to inform you that your regular reporting on classic Italian bikes had an influence on my latest decision to purchase a 1979 Moto Morini 3½ Strada. As a long-time subscriber to your magazine, I am always very pleased to receive the new issue by post here in Germany. My motorcycle purchases of the past have been influenced by your reports about the classic bike scene – my motorcycle career: 1995 Yamaha SR500, 1975 Puch MS50V, 1931 Triumph KV200 from Triumph Werke Nurnberg and now, finally, Franco Lambertini’s masterpiece – the 350cc V-twin Moto Morini 3½ Strada from 1979. The diversity and enthusiasm of your magazine is unique. Reports about events…