EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Home & Garden
The English GardenThe English Garden

The English Garden

March 2019

Enjoy over 60 beautiful gardens a year with The English Garden. Every issue features country, city, cottage and coastal gardens, with advice on how to recreate them. Be inspired by articles written by the country's top garden designers and discover the best plant varieties for your garden, chosen by expert nurserymen and plantspeople.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Chelsea Magazine
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
BUY ISSUE
£4(Incl. VAT)
SUBSCRIBE
£40(Incl. VAT)
13 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
contributors

Alexandra Campbell Alexandra is a novelist and journalist. Her blog, The Middlesized Garden, is all about garden spaces that are smaller than one acre. She explores the daffodils at Mere House on page 44. Annaïck Guitteny Annaïck travels all over the UK and Europe, especially France, her home country, to photograph gardens and plants. She loves revealing the intricate details of flowers, such as the hepaticas she shot on page 79. Mark Diacono Mark spends his time growing, writing and talking about food, specialising in unusual plants such as Szechuan pepper and Asian pears. He established Otter Farm and was involved with River Cottage.IMAGES NEIL HEPWORTH; JASON INGRAM ■…

access_time1 min.
welcome

After long winter weeks of bare soil and leafless trees, it’s no wonder that the sight of spring bulbs starting to flower captures gardeners’ hearts and attention. This issue’s gardens celebrate the joy of bulbs and the colour they bring at this time of year. There’s a veritable carpet of daffodils at Mere House in Kent and Doddington Hall in Lincolnshire, while at Pettifers, the renowned Oxfordshire garden of Gina Price, daffodils are joined by anemones, fritillaries and more, to create a feast for the eyes. But as tempting as it is to keep your gaze firmly at ground level this month, don’t forget to look up occasionally as well. If you have eyes only for bulbs, you might miss other treats, such as the magnificent magnolias at north…

access_time1 min.
vegging out

Felbrigg Hall This 18th-century walled garden in Norfolk (above) dates back to the 18th century, and produces fruit, vegetables and flowers for use in the hall. Enjoy the central pond, and a range of rare fruit trees trained to the walls. Tel: 01263 837444; nationaltrust.org.uk Hampton Court Palace The Kitchen Garden at this London palace (right) has been restored to how it looked when it fed Georgian royals: neat beds produce forgotten crops, such as sweet maudlin, costmary, hartshorn, and trick-madam. Tel: 020 3166 6000; hrp.org.uk Mottisfont Bright, scented herbaceous borders line the walled gardens here in Hampshire. They include a sustainable Kitchen Garden, combining tradition with contemporary design. Tel: 01794 340757; nationaltrust.org.uk Hyde Hall Following a circular design to represent the globe, the ‘Global…

access_time1 min.
hestercombe gardens

Taunton, Somerset Hestercombe Gardens showcases three centuries of wonderful garden design: the elegant Georgian landscape garden designed by Coplestone Warre Bampfylde; the Victorian Terrace and Shrubbery; and the Formal Gardens, which were designed by the Edwardian Lutyens/ Jekyll partnership. Altogether they make up 50 acres of woodland walks, temples, terraces, pergolas, lakes and cascades. Visitors can also enjoy a contemporary art gallery, a second-hand bookshop, a restored watermill and barn, and a network of family garden trails. Hestercombe Garden, Cheddon Fitzpaine, Taunton, Somerset TA2 8LG. Open for the NGS on 5 March, 10am-5pm. Light refreshments available. Adult £12.50; child: £6.25. ■…

access_time1 min.
places to go

Red and RARE Chiswick House Camellia Show 1-31 March, London Enjoy a collection of more than 33 varieties of rare and historic camellias in the Grade I listed conservatory at Chiswick House, including ‘Middlemist’s Red’, one of the world’s rarest flowers, which London-born John Middlemist brought over from China in 1804. Included in the celebrations are a camellia competition and a pop-up shop selling heritage camellias›over the weekend of 23-24 March. Tel: 020 3141 3350; chiswickhouseandgardens.org.uk Golden FANFARE Dazzling Daffodils at Hever Castle 20-24 March, Kent Hever Castle and Gardens will host ‘Dazzling Daffodils’ for the second year running, allowing visitors to wander among 14,000 bulbs blooming across the gardens. Included in the impressive range of varieties on display will be the…

access_time1 min.
looking ahead: march courses

Poetry Appreciation 2 March, Birmingham A two-day course on American poets celebrates Birmingham Botanical Gardens’ planned replanting of North American herbaceous plants. Ticket £30. Tel: 0121 4505093; birmingham botanicalgardens.org.uk Birdwatching for Beginners 7 March-30 May, Devon If you’re a complete beginner who would love to learn more about birds, take part in this ten-session RSPB course led by volunteer Chris Lee at Darts Farm. Tickets from £68. Tel: 01392 833311; www.rspb.org.uk Living Medicine 10 March-10 Nov, London Expect talks, tastings and health assessments at this five-day course on practical natural remedies. Tickets £459. Tel: 020 7352 5646; chelseaphysicgarden.co.uk Discover Bonsai 22 March, Surrey Join this workshop at RHS Wisley to learn how these miniature trees are cultivated, and style your own tree. Tickets…

RECENT ISSUES

help