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Travel AfricaTravel Africa

Travel Africa July-September 2018

The only international magazine dedicated to exploring Africa's diverse attractions, national parks, wildlife, culture and history. Travel Africa draws on some of the world's top photographers, writers and experts to create an inspiring and practical resource for anyone interested in the world's most exciting continent.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Gecko Publishing Ltd
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4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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travelafricamag.com

CONSERVATIONSILENT EXTINCTION?Fiona Mackay explains how and why the giraffe is under great threat, and travels to Uganda’s Kidepo National Park to learn how giraffe populations are tracked and protected.ADVENTUREON FOOT IN THE WILDERNESSRenata Harper walks the famous Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Wilderness Trail in South Africa’s Zululand, a phenomenal experience for adventurous travellers.INTERVIEWART SAFARIThe continent is well known for the inspiration artists can glean from it. Mary-Anne Bartlett tells us about her unique company Art Safari, tailored for those seeking a creative streak in the wilderness. Read this interview at travelafricamag.com.SHAMWARI &Sign up to our free Shamwari Newsletter to receive our mini-mag, Travel Africa Extra, at the end of every month, plus ideas, stories, interviews and advice to inspire you with planning your next African safari.(HEATHER RICHARDSON)SHORT BREAKBEYOND TABLE MOUNTAINVisiting Cape Town? This…

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karibu

(WILL BIRTLES (2))Spread the word“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world,” Nelson Mandela famously said. One hundred years after his birth, these words are as relevant as ever. Education is still fundamental to our ability to protect our Earth and create a sustainable planet. We must learn from the mistakes of our past and act now to conserve our wildlife, landscapes and communities for future generations.In the context of Africa, we need to change people’s misconceptions about the continent, and encourage everyone to play their part — by travelling to some of Africa’s amazing, far-flung destinations, in so doing supporting conservation efforts through tourism. But even more vital is to teach local communities about the value of safeguarding wildlife and their habitats, and…

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storytellers

1 Ann and Steve ToonNamibia, page 112“Namibia is full of surprises. Driving round the wind-blown, deserted coastline on our trip we turned the corner into one bay to find a large raft of fluorescent pink flamingos dancing comically through the surf. The country’s full of unexpected, way-out treats like that.” Ann and Steve are photojournalists with a passion for the wildlife and wild places of Africa. The couple contribute to a wide range of publications and also run photographic safaris.2 Sophie IbbotsonMalawi, page 68“I came to Lake Malawi for the birds but the highlight was under the water. Jumping off the back of the boat into the cool, clear lake, I was surrounded by brightly coloured fish. The experience was completely magical.” Sophie is an entrepreneur, travel writer and lover…

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this is africa

Protecting paradiseThe Seychelles archipelago has established 210,000sq km of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) as part of a pioneering conservation-finance deal devised by The Nature Conservancy in 2016. In nearly one-third of that area, only very limited activities — including research and regulated tourism — are allowed. Didier Dogley, Seychelles’ Minister of Environment, Energy and Climate Change, announced two new MPAs in the Indian Ocean earlier this year — the first milestones in a process that will end in 2020 with 30 per cent of the Seychelles’ deep-sea ecosystems protected. Oceanic nations are among the most vulnerable to climate change because they are often almost entirely reliant on marine resources. But measures such as these shield them from unsustainable development while safeguarding their economies. ■…

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indaba

(PETER STEMMET)Why you should be returning to Tunisia Page 22At the waterholeOn a typical game drive you can travel for hours in search of animals. So how much more satisfying it can be to sit and wait by a waterhole for the wildlife to come to you. In the bush, water is the key to life, and sooner or later, everyone must come to drink. Some – leopard, cheetah, a nomadic lion with a scruffy mane – are solitary visitors. Elephant families come to wallow, while others turn up in hordes, like the thirsty zebras that have spent all night on the open plains, or the black-bellied sand grouse that pour in like an arrow storm at Kisima Hamsini in northern Kenya. But wherever you are, the photo opportunities are…

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perspective

Life along the River Nile, EgyptWEST AFRICASENEGAL RIVER1641KMTWO OF THIS RIVER’S THREE HEADSTREAMS, THE FALÉMÉ AND BAFING, RISE IN THE FOUTA DJALLON HIGHLANDS IN GUINEA. ITS THIRD HEADSTREAM, THE BAKOYE, RISES IN WESTERN MALI. WHEN THESE TRIBUTARIES MEET AND BECOME ONE, THEY FORM THE BORDER BETWEEN SENEGAL AND MAURITANIA FOR SOME 830KM.WEST AFRICANIGER RIVER4200KMTHE THIRD-LONGEST RIVER IN AFRICA, LIKE THE NILE, FLOODS ANNUALLY. YET, UNLIKE IT, THE WATER OF THE NIGER RUNS CLEAR BECAUSE ITS SOURCE CONTAINS VERY LITTLE SILT. FROM ITS SOURCE IN GUINEA, THE RIVER TRAVELS THROUGH MALI, NIGER AND ALONG THE BENIN BORDER INTO NIGERIA. THE WEST AFRICAN MANATEE, WHICH FACES EXTINCTION, LIVES HERE AND CAN GROW UP TO 4.5M LONG.NORTH AND EAST AFRICANILE RIVER6650KMTHE LONGEST RIVER IN THE WORLD RISES SOUTH OF THE EQUATOR AND FLOWS…

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