EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Fashion
W Magazine

W Magazine

Volume 2, 2020

W means the World of Style. Fashion--and everything fashionable--through the lens of contemporary culture. W's combination of photography and journalism artfully answer the questions Who, What, When, Where, and Why for the people who lead the global conversation in fashion, art, beauty, design, cinema, music, politics and travel.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast US
Frequency:
Interrupted
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in this issue

3 min.
contributors

Quentin Tarantino and Angelo Pennetta “Life of the Party” Tarantino, director (near left) Is there anyone who has had a major influence on you as a filmmaker? The late New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael. I look at her as the arbiter of film writing. Whenever I used to watch movies and characters quoted Aristotle or Camus, I never believed that people walked around with that stuff in their head. I always thought it was a silly movie affectation. Now, I’m in my 50s and all of a sudden I’m spouting Pauline Kael like it’s Confucius. What were your earliest attempts at filmmaking? I started writing scripts when I was 16 or 17, but I never got past page 30. It was always a fragment of a movie I had just seen. And I was trying…

3 min.
triple threat

Long before awards season begins, I try to see as many movies as possible in preparation for our annual Directors Issue, which is now in its third iteration. It was a great year in cinema, and choosing the directors to feature was not easy, but in the end we invited Quentin Tarantino (Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood), Bong Joon Ho (Parasite), and Noah Baumbach (Marriage Story) to direct three remarkable photo shoots for W. Getting to spend time with three of the best directors in the world at the height of their careers has been one of the best parts of my job. It was a joy to witness how they each approached their projects so differently. Baumbach was first. From the start, he knew he wanted to pay homage to…

2 min.
connecting the dots

TB BAG: COURTESY OF BURBERRY; JANE GOODALL: PHOTOGRAPH BY HUGO VAN LAWICK/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC IMAGE COLLECTION; BANKSY, DEVOLVED PARLIAMENT, 2009, COURTESY OF SOTHEBY’S AND PEST CONTROL OFFICE; VERUSCHKA, SAFARI DRESS BY YVES SAINT LAURENT, 1968: © FRANCO RUBARTELLI/VOGUE PARIS; BLOW UP, 1966: EVERETT COLLECTION; ROYAL WEDDING: PHOTOGRAPH BY UNIVERSAL HISTORY ARCHIVE/UNIVERSAL IMAGES GROUP VIA GETTY IMAGES…

14 min.
new in town

Peter Do As a young designer starting out, Peter Do, 29, received a lot of advice from people who had been in the business longer. Much of it went unheeded. Many, for instance, told him it wouldn’t be wise to debut his New York–based brand during the pre-collections in Paris without having a public relations contact or a sales representative in place. But he and his team did it anyway. Paris, they figured, would expose them to a larger audience, and the money they saved on outside help could be used to produce the clothes. So they lugged 110 pieces up five flights in the middle of July to set up in a friend of a friend’s living room that was filled with flies and children’s toys, and posted their whereabouts…

5 min.
my life in parties: jeff klein

Jeff Klein—the hotelier and restaurateur behind New York City’s Monkey Bar, and Los Angeles’s Sunset Tower Hotel and San Vicente Bungalows—grew up in a peripatetic family. “We went on this little boat down the Nile when I was 13, and it was the chicest thing I’d ever seen,” he says. The first time Klein says he felt inspired by a space was during a family trip to Rome, where they stayed in a “little hotel” and ate at a restaurant with “the most delicious, simple, unfussy food. I remember getting this really special feeling.” Now Klein tries to conjure a version of that experience for the patrons of his own properties. On any given night at Sunset Tower or the Bungalows (a members club so private that guests’ phone camera…

9 min.
house proud

When it came to finding a Paris apartment for himself, the young interior designer Fabrizio Casiraghi was willing to settle for a lot less than most of his clients. He didn’t require anything nearly as grand as, say, the 4,500-square-foot apartment he’s currently finishing in a building in the 7th arrondissement. But if Casiraghi’s needs were modest, they were also nonnegotiable. First, two outdoor terraces—one facing each way. “Two little terraces because I need to stay outside, drink a glass of rosé in the sun,” Casiraghi says. Second, a working fireplace. “A small dinner, with risotto around the fireplace, for me is very important—even if I don’t have a table. My mother made these fantastic handmade napkins for me, and I give these to everybody and we sit on the pouf,…