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WebuserWebuser

Webuser 447

Web User is the UK's favourite internet magazine. On sale every fortnight it keeps you up-to-date with all the latest news, views, best new websites, music, film and games downloads, free software, and all the other developments on the Web. If you use the internet, you'll love Web User. Being Britain's best-selling internet read, Web User is, quite simply, the only internet magazine you'll ever need.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dennis Publishing UK
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26 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
ditch your dated downloads

Like Marmite, Brexit and ‘Next customer please’ signs on supermarket checkouts, this issue’s cover feature could prove divisive. “How dare you badmouth CCleaner?”, you may protest; while others cry: “What’s Opera ever done to you?”.Such complaints are of course justified, but how dull and predictable would we be to devote seven pages to recommending software that you already use and have been for years? More importantly, are the programs and apps that once served you well still as effective and reliable as when you first installed them, or are there now better alternatives available?In our cover feature, we answer all these questions and more by choosing our favourite replacements for the tools you use every day. After all, today’s best free software quickly becomes tomorrow’s junk – only four…

access_time1 min.
5 things you’ll learn this issue

1 How to watch YouTube videos on your Android phone without any ads 2 How to detect and delete broken and duplicate bookmarks in Firefox 3 How to save money on train travel by comparing ticket prices with Skyscanner 4 How to combine your Windows Mail and Outlook.com inboxes into one 5 How to open links in Chrome instead of Safari on your iPhone or iPad Subscribe to Web User! Never miss another issue – subscribe at subscribe.webuser.co.uk ■…

access_time5 min.
what’s new online

Make an origami jumping frog Hop along to the BBC Taster website for an interactive lesson in how make your own origami jumping frog. It may sound bizarre, but it’s a clever online experiment from the Beeb that lets you view the video guide from three simultaneous camera angles.Created to accompany the Make Craft Britain series on BBC Four, this innovative tutorial pauses after each instruction to give you time to make a fold and move on when you’re ready. There are also buttons that let you go back and forward to the different steps, as well as diagrams with written instructions, should you find that method easier to follow. All you need is a piece of paper sized 15 x 15cm, a little patience and nimble…

access_time1 min.
new voice commands

Send and create cards Say, “Hey Google, talk to Greetings Cards” to select a greeting and add a personal image to a card to send to a friend. If you use Google Home, the card will also be sent on your phone. Ask for conversions To find out what your sterling gets you abroad, say, “Siri, what is £50 in euros/dollars?” You can also ask “what’s the tip for $50?” to see the amounts for 10, 15 and 20%. Enjoy BBC audio content Listen to podcasts and radio via the BBC’s Alexa skill by saying: “Alexa, open the BBC”, then uttering commands such as “Alexa, ask the BBC to play Radio Two”. ■…

access_time9 min.
need to know

Facebook is warning users whose data was shared with Cambridge Analytica (Credit:ymgerman/Shutterstock.com) Facebook alerts users affected by massive data scandal What happened? Facebook is displaying a pop-up notification to users whose data was collected by Cambridge Analytica, revealing that the political consultancy got its hands on the data of more people than was at first thought. Initially, it was believed Cambridge Analytica mined the profile data of 50 million people, gathered by a researcher using a personality-quiz app three years ago. However, Facebook has now admitted that as many as 87 million users had their data harvested, including more than one million in the UK.Facebook has also had to scramble to fix another potential data leak, after it was revealed that anyone with a bit…

access_time1 min.
first look

Fitbit Versa  bit.ly/fitbit447Could the Fitbit Versa be the smartwatch that finally breaks through to the masses? Fitbit certainly hopes so. It’s stripped away the non-essentials from its first true smartwatch, the Fitbit Ionic, to deliver a more basic wearable at a cut-down price and size. By doing so, it hopes to attract a wider demographic to the smartwatch party, which until now has been dominated by men.The watch feels more compact and lightweight than similar wearables, primarily because it houses a smaller battery. Fitbit claims this lasts for just over four days on a single charge but to achieve this, the screen is off most of the time. You can activate it with a vigorous flick of the wrist but, irritatingly, we found this only worked about half…

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