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What Car?What Car?

What Car?

December 2019

Britain's best car buying guide now has a brand new look with an extra 40-pages in every issue, giving you more of What Car?'s famous comparison tests than ever before and more invaluable buying advice for every car on sale. Plus, What Car?'s Target Price promise could save you thousands off the price of your next car. No wonder they call us the car buyer's bible!

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Haymarket Media Group Ltd
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13 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
welcome

‘Nissan has made a better car rather than a more distinctive one’ How do you replace a car that has been a massive hit primarily due to its radical styling? Do you give your designers free reign again and hope they come up with something equally striking (and popular), or do you hone what you already have? That’s the question Nissan faced with its small SUV, the Juke.And one look at the new car on p12 shows it decided on option two, because from headlights to haunches, it’s instantly recognisable as a Juke. Only time will tell whether this was the right call. But over the years, an evolutionary approach certainly hasn’t hurt another car featured in this issue: the Volkswagen Golf. That, too, originally featured a pretty bold design, before Volkswagen concentrated on…

access_time1 min.
target price

The What Car? Target Price is the maximum you should pay for your new car and is set by our team of mystery shoppers. Every day they haggle to see what discounts are available across the UK. And all What Car?-approved dealers will at least match Target Price. In a lot of cases, however, you can save even more by using our New Car Buying service. Just head to whatcar.com/new-car-deals and select the car you’re interested in, and dealers will compete for your business. It’s all done through our website, so they won’t see your details until you’re ready.…

access_time1 min.
what car

Editorial Tel 020 8267 5900 Email editorial@whatcar.com Media enquiries Andy Bothwell Tel 07825 703505 Meet the team Editor Steve Huntingford Editorial director Jim Holder Deputy editor Darren Moss Reviews editor Will Nightingale Managing editor Allan Muir Consumer editor Claire Evans Used cars editor Mark Pearson Deputy reviews editor John Howell New cars editor Alan Taylor-Jones Video reviews editor Doug Revolta Senior reviewer Boyan Marinov Reviewer Becky Wells Used cars reporter Max Adams Digital reviews editor Chris Haining Sub-editor Kris Culmer Group art editor Stephen Hopkins Brand art editor Chee-Chiu Lee Chief photographer John Bradshaw Senior photographer Will Williams Junior photographer Max Edleston Picture editor Ben Summerell-Youde Designer Rebecca Stevens Prepress manager Darren Jones Head of video Mitch McCabe Videographer Dan Wrenn Junior videographer Oli Kosbab Video apprentice Tej Bhola SEO manager Jonathan Cook SEO executive Oliver Hayman Social media manager Louis Shaw Special contributors Lawrence Allan, James Attwood, Rachel Burgess, Alastair Clements, Steve Cropley, Simon Davis, Tom Evans, Pat Hoy, Rob Keenan, Olgun…

access_time6 min.
volkswagen golf

BACK IN 1974, Ceefax represented the cutting edge of technology, Happy Days was the hit new television show and the closest thing to in-car infotainment was a cassette or eight-track player. In short, it was ever such a long time ago. And yet it was also the year in which the Volkswagen Golf went on sale – a model that has managed to remain relevant and hugely popular ever since by evolving with the times. That relevance and popularity is now under threat like never before, though, as family car buyers are faced with the triple temptation of premium-badged rivals, family SUVs and electric cars. Indeed,Volkswagen’s own ID 3, which was revealed a couple of months ago, is an electric family hatchback with the potential to steal sales from its sibling. Not…

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the rivals the new golf has to beat

BMW 1 Series Target Price From £23,029 Pick of the range 118d SE The low-speed ride is firm, but the 1 Series feels just as well built as the Golf inside and handles well, so it’s certainly worthy of your consideration. Ford Focus Target Price From £16,942 Pick of the range 1.0 Ecoboost 125 Titanium Roomy in the back, truly entertaining to drive and rides in a surprisingly supple manner. It’s just a shame that its interior feels so cheap. Mercedes-Benz A-Class Target Price From £20,941 Pick of the range A180d Sport Has more wow factor than the Golf inside and strikes a fine balance between comfort and control on the road. It’s not the quietest, though. Skoda Octavia Target Price From £17,008 Pick of the range 1.5 TSI SE The most practical car in the class, plus it’s well equipped and most versions are cheap to buy and…

access_time8 min.
nissan juke

THE ORIGINAL NISSAN Juke was an absolute trailblazer. Designed as an alternative to conventional small cars such as the Ford Fiesta and Volkswagen Polo, its high-riding stance put a touch of SUV style and glamour within the grasp of the masses. And despite its quirky looks not being to everyone’s tastes, it sold by the proverbial bucketload and inspired a raft of high-riding small cars, including the Renault Captur, Skoda Kamiq and Volkswagen T-Cross. The trouble is, even if you loved the way the original Juke looked (and plenty did), there weren’t many logical reasons for actually buying one. Even when it was first launched way back in 2010, its driving position and road manners stood out as noticeable flaws. By the time cars like the Kia Stonic and Seat Arona…

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