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EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Grazia

Grazia Issue 789

Grazia combines 'A-list' celebrity exclusives with thought-provoking, real-life features and agenda-setting fashion. Each week we bring you: - 'A-lister' celebrity news and gossip - The very latest in fashion news and trends - What's hot NOW - Amazing real-life stories - Reports from all the key fashion shows around the world. Love fashion and celebrities? Then you'll love Grazia!

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Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
H BAUER PUBLISHING LIMITED
Frequency:
Biweekly
$2.75
$48.34
25 Issues

in this issue

1 min
star letter

BRAVERY IN HER GRIEF I could identify with ‘Chrissy sharing her baby loss will help other women’ (19 Oct). I may be one of your oldest readers (94) but I can still remember as if it were yesterday when my third son was stillborn 66 years ago. In those days no one encouraged you to hold your baby if he had died – he was taken away and I never saw him again. In the aftermath of losing Stephen, the thing that helped me most was isolating myself. My husband and I cocooned ourselves at home. People deal with grief in different ways. But my heart goes out to Chrissy Tiegen. If sharing her baby loss on Instagram has helped other women, she should be commended for being brave enough to…

1 min
grazia view

Keep dancing, Fatima, and follow your dream “You probably saw the recent iterations of the Government’s ‘Rethink. Reskill. Reboot’ campaign, which seemed to be encouraging people in the arts to consider a career change. The poster showed ballet dancer ‘Fatima’ with the caption, ‘Fatima’s next job could be in cyber. (She just doesn’t know it yet.)’ Thousands shared it on social media in rage; others posted parodies. We hope it didn’t encourage anyone in the arts to give up on their dream; great art, TV, film, music, dance and theatre (streamed to our devices) is what’s getting us through right now. The arts are vital and should be valued and protected so that, when all this is over, there’s a stage for people to return to.”…

3 min
hands off our hair!

FEW WOMEN HAVE explored the potency of Afro hair to a greater extent than Emma Dabiri. A social historian (she’s a fellow in the Africa department at SOAS University of London and a visual sociology PhD researcher at Goldsmiths), Emma’s debut book Don’t Touch My Hair was published in 2019 to worldwide acclaim. This month, she leads the conversation in the documentary Hair Power: Me And My Afro as contributors – including teen campaigner Ruby Williams – talk frankly about how their identities have been shaped by their hair. Emma grew up in 1980s Dublin, the daughter of a Black Irish-Nigerian father and a white Trinidadian-born mother, in a predominantly white community. ‘My hair was always presented to me as a problem that needed to be solved and managed,’ says Emma.…

1 min
injustice makes me so angry. i want to campaign without getting upset

Sophie Walker is chief executive of Young Women’s Trust and author of Five Rules For Rebellion: Let’s Change The World Ourselves It’s hard not to get angry when you start to engage with tough issues. To be enraged by unfairness, suffering and pain is a completely normal reaction. There’s a lot of pressure on women not to show anger, so often angry women are dismissed by men as ‘shrill’ or ‘hysterical’ – or, in the words of President Trump, ‘nasty’. The pressure on women not to protest comes from people who like things just as they are. Free your anger but don’t let it eat you up. Listen to it without fear. Your anger will teach you things about yourself – what you care about and why. Channelling your anger turns you from reactive…

1 min
set work-life boundaries for your home office

Carina Lawson is a time management coach and founder of Ponderlily planners and journals; carinalawson.com It’s easy to plough on beyond office hours if your laptop is always in sight. This is how burnout happens and why you need boundaries. First, get yourself on-board. Think of the boundaries you want and why; this is the best way to actually stick to them. For instance, no looking at work emails after 6pm. Then present these boundaries to co-workers and family. Use tools to help you. An email signature stating the times you are available manages expectations. I also use the Boomerang app, which stops me looking at emails out of hours. You’ll need physical boundaries, too. Designate an area in which to work and stick to it; this trains your brain to think, ‘This is…

2 min
here come the… curls

‘GONE ARE THE days of fashion brands asking us to uniformly style models’ hair so every girl looks the same,’ says Syd Hayes, BaByliss ambassador and the hair styling pro behind the looks you see here. ‘Take high-street giant Zara, for example. The brief on all of its recent shoots has been “natural”. They want the hair that the girl comes into the studio with, just slightly tweaked and enhanced with styling tools and products to get the most out of their natural style.’ This means, after far too long of doing the opposite, curls are no longer straightened to oblivion. Oh no, they’re crunched up with curl creams, they’re amped up with tongs and wands, they’re encouraged to be bigger and bolder than ever. The future has big hair…