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Gun DigestGun Digest

Gun Digest November 2018

Gun Digest is your source for firearms news, pricing and classifieds. Our in-depth editorial, exclusive price guide and new product features bring valuable information to your hobby.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Caribou Media, LLC
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16 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
getting your wings

I remember the first time I shot with a suppressor as vividly as I remember anchoring my first whitetail, or the first time a spotter yelled “HIT!” after sending one long at a target more than a mile away. There was definitely a cool factor, and obtaining a can in those days was so labor intensive — not so different today, I know — that getting to run some rounds through one made me feel like Charlie must’ve felt when he cracked open the Wonka Bar to discover the Golden Ticket. But the cool factor wasn’t even the coolest part of that experience. What impressed me most about that first suppressed shot was the sound the bullet made as it impacted steel, a sound unencumbered by the muzzle blast we’re all used…

access_time3 min.
the leupold rx-2800 tbr/w laser rangefinder

Leupold & Stevens has upped their game ... there’s no denying that fact. A simple look at the VX-5HD and VX-6HD riflescopes will confirm that. But they aren’t just concentrating on their scopes; the new Leupold RX-2800 TBR/W rangefinder is a wonderful little tool, and their recent efforts are equally apparent here as well. It’s a rangefinder worthy of anyone’s range bag or hunting pack. Many rangefinders, like our riflescopes, seem to be growing in size as the features become more complex. Not so with the RX-2800 — in fact, it’s not much bigger than a pack of cigarettes, and I appreciate good, concise, lightweight gear. It has a 7x magnification range, and that’s extremely helpful. I’ve been frustrated with low magnification rangefinders giving a reading on unintended objects because I…

access_time1 min.
the .300 aac blackout

The intent behind the .300 AAC Blackout was to offer a .30-caliber cartridge that would function in AR-15 rifles without a reduction in magazine capacity, that was compatible with the standard bolt, and that would offer both supersonic and subsonic performance. The .300 AAC Blackout was developed by Advanced Armament Corporation (AAC) and is almost identical to the .300 Whisper. Or, the .300 AAC Blackout is as a standardization of the .300/.221 Wildcat. Originally, AAC standardized the case dimensions and submitted the cartridge to SAAMI, which has established a maximum average operating pressure of 55,000 psi. The .300 AAC Blackout offers supersonic performance similar to the 7.62x39 Soviet cartridge or .30-30 Winchester. Much of the appeal of this cartridge is its subsonic performance, but there is some contention that optimum performance…

access_time4 min.
letters to the editor

Reloading Madness I have fired military 7.62 ball and tracer in a HK 91, with ball-fired brass having only scorch-marks from the chamber fluting — but the tracer brass had slight extrusion into the fluting. I reloaded this brass for a couple of years and then read a magazine article warning that reloading HK brass was dangerous. I found the bearing surfaces between ball and tracer were slightly different, with tracer bullets being longer, which caused a higher chamber pressure … which caused the extrusion. What is this warning about? Also, reloading articles and manuals warn about firing cartridges with brass trimmed too short, referencing headspace issues. I was shooting a .40 S&W and converted the gun to .357 Sig. Articles and manuals warned that resizing .40 S&W to .357 Sig would…

access_time1 min.
digital/new in the store

FROM THE GUN BLOGS AT GUNDIGEST.COM GREAT GUNS Weatherby’s Krieger Custom Rifle Weatherby partnered with Krieger to improve the rifle that made Roy Weatherby famous. PERFORMANCE ARS The Long-Range 6.5 Grendel An Alexander Arms AR in 6.5 Grendel bangs steel fast and furious past 600 yards with ease. LONG-RANGE OPTICS Mils vs. MOA: Which Is Best For You? Mils and MOA are both useful angular units of measurements, but is one better than the other? It depends upon your needs. CLASSIC GUNS FBI Guns Photo Gallery Take an insider’s tour into the G-man’s world of firearms and training with these historical photos. SOCIAL SPOTLIGHT Find us on Facebook! facebook.com/gundigest Follow us on Twitter! @gundigest Follow us on Instagram! @Gun.Digest…

access_time5 min.
making the case for .45 acp ‘hardball’

I spend about a month in South Africa every year. Most of that time is spent hunting, and I’ll have a rifle nearby. However, I carry a handgun every day and feel kinda naked if I don’t have one on my side. The problem is, you cannot take a defensive handgun to South Africa. Fortunately, having friends in African places has its advantages, and every year a professional hunter loans me the use of his original Colt’s 1911 in 45 ACP. The first year he offered I was a bit surprised to find the magazines loaded with 230-grain FMJ ammo. Commonly referred to as “hardball,” most defensive handgun experts consider this stuff only marginal as a carry load. I generally prefer an expanding bullet as well, so I asked the professional,…

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