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HEIRLOOM GARDENERHEIRLOOM GARDENER

HEIRLOOM GARDENER

Spring 2019

Heirloom Gardener is your complete guide to the rich past and traditional uses of time-tested edible, medicinal and ornamental plant varieties.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ogden Publications, Inc.
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$24
4 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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heirloomgardener.com

POPULAR ONLINE ARTICLE:“HEIRLOOM APPLES: AN AMERICAN CLASSIC”The flavor profiles of heirloom apples stand in stark epicurean contrast to the flavors of ‘Red Delicious,’ ‘McIntosh,’ ‘Gala,’ and other supermarket apples. These are often described the same way, as “sweet” and “mild.” Beneath their perfect peels, these fruits are uniform, uninteresting, and even bland.Scott Farm Orchard in southern Vermont has more than 3,000 trees in production, representing more than 125 different apple cultivars. Most are of American provenance and date from the 19th and 20th centuries, but a number of older French and English trees are also grown there. The orchard dates from the 1700s, and you can read about some of the unique cultivars preserved there by visiting www.HeirloomGardener.com/Orchard.FEATURED BLOGGER:LAURA FLACKS-NARROL “FOOD NOT BOUGHT”Laura has a passion for growing food and…

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greener with each year

GARDEN SURPRISES are sometimes fun. For example, the unexpected volunteers from the compost that bring a bumper crop of butternut squash or an already hardened tomato seedling or two. Other surprises call for creativity, and a Plan B, or simply more work as we start over. I find that I revisit the garden catalog or reference book, or turn to quiet observation to know what to do next. I also work with a host of experienced gardeners here at Ogden Publications; across all of our departments are people who inspire a can-do attitude and community connection through personal and professional interest in self-sufficiency, homesteading, old farm machinery, classic motorcycles, and heirloom plants. As a company, we’re committed to being active, positive members of those communities we help foster. It’s rather…

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feedback from our readers

NEW YEAR, NEW KNOWLEDGEThank you for another year of your excellent publication, Heirloom Gardener! I hope the team behind this magazine enjoyed the holidays and are ready to bring us more info-packed issues in the new year.Anna M. BulcherHEALTHY CHOICESI shop from and support organic farmers, and I prefer my food grown in rich, healthy soil, but “Organic Certification for Hydroponic Systems” (Spring 2018) is a great article and very informative. I just hope they start labeling whether USDA Organic produce is soil-grown or greenhouse-grown so I have a choice.Survey commentHUNGRY FOR HERBSThis is such a great magazine! The advice from Heirloom Gardener is so valuable that I keep all the issues for future reference and new ideas for fruits and vegetables. The articles with information on different herbs are…

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recommended tools and accessories

The Garden Boss by Bucket Boss is a versatile bucket apron with 12 pockets for storing a multitude of gardening supplies. Editor Russell Mullin says, “I love having the ability to keep my most-used hand tools in one place. You’ll find thoughtfully sized pockets that can accommodate your pruners, trowel, plant markers, seed packets, and more. There’s even a clip for your gloves, and the bucket can hold larger supplies, weeds, or your harvest. It really maximizes the versatility of a simple bucket.”The Garden Boss has uses outside the garden too. “I’ve found that this bucket apron works perfectly for my bee supplies as well. I have places for all of my tools, with room in the bucket to keep my bee suit and smoker fuel. I place the lid…

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up-to-date news on glyphosate’s link to cancer, social media for heirloom gardeners, and low-nitrogen corn.

NEW RULINGS ON GLYPHOSATE EXPOSUREMonsanto, owned by Bayer AG, made headlines recently—and not in a good way.Monsanto’s Roundup contains the active ingredient glyphosate, which acts as a non-selective herbicide. Monsanto defends the safety of their product with a December 2017 memo in which the Environmental Protection Agency claims that “glyphosate is not likely to be carcinogenic to humans.” However, the cancer research arm of the World Health Organization rules that glyphosate is “probably carcinogenic” to humans.To date, there are more than 5,000 open civil suits against Monsanto based on allegations of a strong link between glyphosate exposure and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The first of these suits went to trial in the summer of 2018.Dewayne “Lee” Johnson was diagnosed with terminal non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2014, and his doctors have said that it…

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heirloom gardener hits the road

1. Get up close and personal with some favorite farm animals at the Mother Earth News fairs. (CASEY MARSHALL)3. Attendees can buy handmade wooden items directly from the creator. (ZACH FOELY)4. Lanart displays an adorable assortment of animals made from Peruvian alpaca fiber. (ZACH FOLEY)2. The fair in Topeka, Kansas, attracts bee enthusiasts ready to share their knowledge with others. (NANCY HEENEY)5. NOTO Arts Place advocates for sustainable living and environmental awareness. (CASEY MARSHALL) ■…

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