Allrecipes December 2015 - January 2016

Introducing brand-new Allrecipes…the only magazine that brings you the absolute best of the best from over 43,000 tried-and-true family favorites on allrecipes.com! Each issue brings you hundreds of secrets you won’t see anywhere else – fast tips to save you time and money, step-by-step how-to’s, and ideas to help you put your own spin on every dish!

国家:
United States
语言:
English
出版商:
Meredith Operations Corporation
出版周期:
Bimonthly
HK$38.85
HK$93.34
6 期号

本期

2
red-nosed reindeer treats

armagazine.com/red-nosed-reindeer-treats “With some gumdrops, pretzels and a little creativity, you and your little elves can make a whole team of Santa’s flying friends.” —Kellogg’s® Rice Krispies® Directions Ingredients 3 tablespoons butter or margarine 1 (10 ounce) package regular marshmallows 6 cups Kellogg’s® Rice Krispies® cereal or Kellogg’s® Cocoa Krispies® cereal 12 regular pretzel twists 12 red gumdrops canned frosting or decorating gel food coloring Directions 1 In large saucepan melt butter over low heat. Add marshmallows and stir until completely melted. Remove from heat. 2 Add Kellogg’s® Rice Krispies® cereal. Stir until well coated. 3 Using a buttered spatula or wax paper, evenly press mixture into a 15x10x1-inch pan coated with cooking spray. Cool. Using cookie cutters coated with cooking spray, cut 12 2½-inch circles and 12 1½-inch circles. Frost the tops of the 1½-inch circles. 3 For each reindeer use frosting to…

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letter from allrecipes

The Allrecipes community is a BIG family—13 million members who are trying, tasting, and exchanging recipes and cooking tips. Wouldn’t it be great if you could tap into that collective wisdom? You can! Go to “Ask the Community” (armagazine.com/ask-the-community) and post your burning cooking questions. The answers are out there, and we promise, there are no dumb questions. Here’s a sampling: Happy eating! YOUR ALLRECIPEEPS Kylie-Anne Deigratia Leske is asking: Why would you soak a chicken in salt water overnight, before roasting it? Wouldn’t this toughen the meat? Baking Nana says: Brining is actually a chemical reaction that relaxes the very lean muscle structure of the meat. Use kosher salt, in these proportions: ¾ to 1 cup salt for every gallon of water. Elle says: According to an article I read, a brine “adds flavor and keeps…

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kitchensink

MERRY BERRIES When most of us buy a pint of strawberries, we see the obvious: a bunch of berries in a plastic container. But Allrecipes community member Barbara saw a posse of mini Santas, with chubby little bodies and pointy caps. Just hull each berry and slice off the tip, then add some whipped cream for the face and buttons (and a beard, too, if you like). finally, add chocolate sprinkles for eyes that have a special twinkle. (Go to armagazine.com/mini-strawberry-santas if you need more instruction.) These fellas will get your (Christmas) party started. PHOTO: KATE SEARS; FOOD STYLING: CARRIE PURCELL; PROP STYLING: KATE PARISIAN…

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land of nog

Americans love their nog—we guzzle around 15 million gallons of it every winter (and that’s not even counting the eggnog creamers, coffees, cocktails, and desserts we’re consuming). But we can’t take credit for inventing it. Historians have traced eggnog’s roots back to 14th-century England, when men would sip a hot cocktail called posset. It was originally made with warm milk, ale (or sherry), and various spices. It didn’t include eggs until several years later, when, because milk and eggs were so costly, the drink was a treat only for the wealthy. By the 1700s, eggnog was common all over Europe and in America. Most American colonists produced their own milk and eggs. And the sherry was replaced with rum, which was less expensive. It’s said that George Washington whipped up his…

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speculoos cookie butter

Watch out, Nutella! Speculoos Cookie Butter is here, and it’s being smeared on toast, muf fins, and waffles; stirred into oatmeal; used as a dip for pretzels; and spooned straight from the jar. It̵7s a sweet spread made of finely ground gingerbread-like cookies called speculoos. It has a consistency similar to peanut butter and tastes very much like Cinnamon Teddy Grahams. Speculoos are European, made for centuries in the Netherlands and Belgium for St. Nicholas Day in early December. The dough gets pressed flat by detailed molds and baked into thin, crisp cookies that signal the holidays for bakers all over the world. They’re also a favorite airline snack. In the 1930s, Lotus Bakeries in Belgium made speculoos oblong shaped and renamed them Biscoff cookies, pitching them as the perfect partner…

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that’s a wrap

—NICHOLIO Spiceologist spices and rubs: This funky company is turning out spice blends that will turn on the griller in your life. Maui Wowwwy (with dried pineapple and black sesame seeds) does wonders for pork, Chile Margarita heats up ordinary chicken, and Raspberry-Chipotle will fire up everything from tacos to brownies. (4-ounce jar, $12; sampler of six 2-ounce jars, $34, spiceologist.com) Made from watermelon rinds, Pickled Pink spiced pickles can liven up anything from a turkey or ham sandwich to a cheese plate. Try the thick-cut, jalapeño-spiked cucumber pickles, too. (24-ounce jar, $10, pickledpinkfoods.com) The folks at Potlicker say their beer and wine jellies—like Oatmeal Stout, India Pale Ale, and Rosemary-Garlic Chablis—have you covered “from toast to roast.” They’re right: Spread some on a grilled cheese sandwich or your next pork roast. (8-ounce…

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