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BikeBike

Bike

June 2019

Bike Magazine showcases the sport of mountain biking like no other publication. It captures the sport's personalities, trends, and issues with a style all its own. Using insightful feature articles and the sport's best photography, Bike is sure to make you want to get outside and ride.

国家:
United States
语言:
English
出版商:
American Media Operations, Inc
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9 期号

本期

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bike

EDITORIAL Editor | Nicole Formosa Photo & Video Editor | Satchel Cronk Art Direction | Tyler Hartlage Gear Editor | Travis Engel Senior Editor | Will Ritchie Editor-At-Large | Mike Ferrentino Founding Photo Editor | David Reddick Captain Gravity | Mike Vihon Senior Writers | Kristin Butcher, Matt Coté, Devon O’Neil, Ryan Palmer, Jonathon Weber Contributing Writers | Graham Averill, Ryan Cleek, Kim Cross, Andrew Findlay, Kurt Gensheimer, Lacy Kemp, Sam McMain, Brice Minnigh, Tess Weaver Strokes, Ryan Stuart Senior Photographers | Mattias Fredriksson, John Gibson, Bruno Long, Sterling Lorence, Scott Markewitz, Margus Riga Contributing Photographers | Stef Candé, Ian Collins, Toby Cowley, Ryan Creary, Jeff Cricco, Ale Di Lullo, Derek DiLuzio, Jay Goodrich, Paris Gore, Rene Gouin, Grant Gunderson, Ian Hylands, Justa Jeskova, Nicolas Joly, Blake Jorgenson, Abner Kingman, Reuben Krabbe, Kevin Lange, Jean-baptiste Liautard, Steve Lloyd, Mark Mackay, Adrian Marcoux,…

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with contraction and comes possibility space time

MANY OF YOU HAVE ALREADY NOTICED a change in the number of issues you’ve seen show up in your mailbox this year, but for those who haven’t, we’ve moved to a quarterly print schedule following a change in the magazine’s ownership earlier this year. This more interspersed print approach allows our small staff the time and resources to produce more content to serve a growing digital audience, particularly in the gear realm. While long-form bike reviews and comprehensive gear coverage will always have a place in print, we’ll complement those pieces with a more robust online offering. We’ve also put more emphasis than ever on video, adding additional bike tests—both as part of our expanding Bible of Bike Tests presence and standalone video reviews—and broadening our non-gear video content, like with…

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buzz

Utah is such a special place for freeride mountain biking and I love going back time and time again to photograph there. Why? The natural landscape—with its stunning colors, textures, soil types and physical structure—makes for the ultimate canvasfor riders looking to creatively push two-wheeled possibility. The tiny town of Big Water fully embraces this, which is awesome—they’ve even allotted space where riders can dig and create masterpieces like this one for Brett Rheeder, used when we were filming his segment for Anthill Films’ new movie, “Return to Earth.” British Columbia had one of the worst forest fire seasons on record in 2018. Last summer, I was working near this particularly haunting stretch in the Monashees. At least 40 people were battling it at one point as it swelled to 35 hectares…

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dog day afternoon

“Where are my people? I’m so thirsty! Why did I run to a place with almost no shade? Can I follow you? Will you help me? I don’t know if I’m going to make it on my own.” These are just a few thoughts that may have run through Annie’s head when she got lost on the Whole Enchilada on a hot, late-summer day in Moab in 2016. After all, the desert can be a brutal and inhospitable place if you’re not prepared. Elevation, extreme heat and lack of water sources can take down even the most seasoned rider after they make a wrong turn. Now, imagine that same scenario, but for a dog. September 2016 was a hot month in Moab. With temperatures soaring into the 90s and the air…

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standing the best of time

On a warm February day in Fullerton, California, Tinker Juarez bombs ifornia, down a hill on his 21-pound Cannondale hardtail. The hill is small, maybe six seconds of full-throttle descending, a highlight on an otherwise tame 11-mile loop. Nonetheless, Juarez’s eyes sparkle and he lets out a wide smile when he reaches the bottom. “That’s all it takes to love mountain biking,” he says. “It’s like catching a fish after four hours of waiting. Once you catch that fish, you completely forget how long it took you to catch it.” Juarez is uniquely qualified to render this opinion. At 58, and nearly two decades after his Hall of Fame cross-country career ended, the two-time Olympian somehow remains the busiest racer in the sport—and one of its most successful. He scaled back…

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the seldom seen scene

“A body at rest will remain at rest, and a body in motion will remain in motion unless it is acted upon by an external force.” ~ Newton’s first law of motion. “Haven’t seen you out in a while,” he said, giving me one of those long up-and-down looks that felt to me like I was being inventoried. “You not riding bikes anymore?” Hmm. Is it my stomach? Dude, I’m 54, and I like beer. Stomachs happen. Maybe it’s the past couple years of ranch living and a steady, relentless diet of heavy shoveling. I don’t look much like a cyclist anymore, all top-heavy with shoulders and back, and that stomach. But still, what the fuck? “Been riding plenty. If my legs had any say, it feels like a whole lot more than…

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