Cape Argus 2021-12-02

The Cape Argus newspaper is a dynamic city newspaper that now offers a morning edition as well as its traditional afternoon offering, in a US broadsheet (54×8) design. It is aimed at the middle to upper income groups and seeks to lead debate in and about the city and to cover issues that are relevant to its market. It prides itself in not only excelling in covering serious, general and political news from the region, but also entertainment and sport.

国家:
South Africa
语言:
English
出版商:
Independent Media Pty Ltd
出版周期:
Daily
HK$3.41
HK$439.19
253 期号

本期

4
as conflict intensifies, a humanitarian catastrophe beckons

Chad Williams chad.williams@africannewsagency.com Ethiopia, the seat of the African Union (AU), is on the verge of implosion. The country has been racked by conflict since the Tigray Liberations Movement Front (TPLF) resorted to seceding from Ethiopia in the middle of last year. While negotiations between the federal government and the TPLF have not yielded any tangible results, the concern is that the conflict could escalate and plunge the country into a humanitarian catastrophe. On Tuesday, a webinar hosted by the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) discussed the current political situation in Ethiopia under the theme, “Ethiopia at the crossroad: Where to for peace and stability in the Horn of Africa”. Speakers included researchers from the Institute for Security Studies and professors from leading South African universities. Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed,…

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2
lesco good case study on locally produced goods, says proudly sa

Eustace Mashimbye I HAD A conversation with one of our members recently about the different access to market opportunities that membership of the buy local movement offers. One with which we have struggled over the years is finding shelf space with our leading retailers for more locally manufactured items – from white goods to fast-moving consumer goods. We have had many round table discussions with the country’s retail chains, but only a few have yielded any meaningful results. One sector in which we have, however, made great progress is with clothing retail stores, where the sectoral masterplan has played a major part in seeing an increase in locally manufactured clothing and apparel on their shelves. The sector continues to be a blueprint that can be adopted for other sectors…

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2
how sa shoppers plan to spend this festive season

Given Majola given.majola@inl.co.za SOUTH Africans are predicted to each spend an average of R6 326 over and above their usual monthly expenses during this festive season, an annual Summer Spending survey by short-term lender Wonga reveals. Based on Statistics SA’s mid-year population size estimates, the survey said this meant that local consumers were set to pump R252 billion into the local economy. Some 6 400 South Africans shared their plans for the festive season in the survey conducted last month. This revealed where they planned to be, what gifts they would like and how much they intended to spend. They also gave an indication of how they were feeling about next year. According to the results, the average spend per person over this period was forecast to…

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3
food prices continue on upward trajectory – pmbejd

THE festive season always ushered in higher prices and unbelievable savings, therefore it would be important that prices remained fair during this period, according to the Pietermaritzburg Economic Justice and Dignity Group (PMBEJD) In November, the average cost of the Household Food Basket was R4 272.44. Compared to the previous month, the average cost of the Household Food Basket decreased by R45.11 (-1%), from R4 317.56 in October 2021 to R4 272.44 in November 2021. Year-on-year, the average cost of the Household Food Basket increased by R254.19 (6.3%), from R4 018.25 in November last year to R4 272.44 in November this year. Since the start of the Household Affordability Index in September 2020 the average cost of the Household Food Basket increased by R416.10 (10.8%), from R3 856.34 in September…

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1
what to watch on tv tonight

DREAMS OF GOMORRAH SHOWMAX In this local feature film, a young woman named Phiwo, who has a strict, religious father, travels to Durban to get married – but she finds herself falling in love with a woman. ALASKAN BUSH PEOPLE DISCOVERY, DSTV CHANNEL 121, 8PM The Browns, a family of nine, live deep in the Alaskan bush. This season is dedicated to the late family patriarch, Billy Brown, who died in February. As the season begins, Billy rallies the family on their North Star Ranch just before it is burnt to the ground by wildfires. MOJA LOVE, DSTV CHANNEL 157, 9.30PM Siyabonga Mdlalose highlights issues around property ownership and the property disputes that happen within South African communities, from low-income households to ultra-rich families. Find out what happens…

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4
korean musicians taking the world by storm with k-pop

Liam Karabo Joyce liam.joyce@inl.co.za When it comes to music, language is no barrier. That’s because, as clichéd as it might sound, music really is a universal language. This is why Korean music, aka K-pop, has become so popular. Thanks to toe-tapping techno beats, crazy-colourful aesthetic, trend-defining fashion and perfectly choreographed videos, K-pop has become something of a global phenomenon and its stars are smashing records. From BTS winning Artist of the Year at this years American Music Awards to Blackpink being the first K-pop group to perform at Coachella in 2019, these stars are shining bright. K pop is part of what is called “Hallyu”, which means “Korean wave”. It refers to the colossal and ever-growing impact of South Korean culture, shown in the popularity of everything from K-dramas on…

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